Public Safety

In the first quarter of 2020, the city’s police solved 31.7 percent of major crimes compared to 36.8 percent the year prior. The drop could be attributed to COVID-19 and social unrest caused by the killing of George Floyd.
Several big-city mayors have announced retirements or have been defeated this year, their approval ratings driven down by the pandemic and policing.
The city’s new $15 million emergency response systems overhaul will encrypt the frequencies of nine city departments, making it no longer possible for the public to monitor police and fire scanners.
The state approved legislation that will require all uniformed police officers to wear body cams by Jan. 1, 2025, but many local agencies cannot afford the technology without financial assistance.
They suffer from sexual assaults at alarming rates. The much-maligned private prison industry can have an important role to play.
Maryland, Montana and Utah are the only states in the nation that limit what police can access through genealogy websites. State lawmakers have agreed that the final law is a fair compromise.
Left turns are dangerous and slow down traffic. One solution? Get rid of them. New research shows that limiting left turns at busy intersections would improve safety and reduce frustrating backups.
The proposed California bill would have created excise taxes on the sale of new guns and would have raised more than $100 million annually for gun violence prevention programs. It failed by nine votes.
An appellate court ruling determined that public records penalties against the city of Tacoma, Wash., will be reviewed for the police department’s use of a cellphone tracking system to locate suspect devices.
The Ohio Criminal Sentencing Commission would enable common-pleas judges to electronically determine a felony sentencing, aiming to reduce bias and errors. But some judges worry the system will diminish judicial independence.