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State Transportation Funding Boosts Can't Replace Federal Dollars, Road Builders Say

Dave Bauer, the CEO of the American Road & Transportation Builders Association, says the Trump administration and Congress need to pitch in to help states accomplish their transportation goals.


Small City, Big Goals: How an Unconventional Mayor Is Beating the System

West Sacramento, Calif.'s Christopher Cabaldon has revived his town and become a player on the national stage.


A Year After Online Sales Tax Ruling, Are States Reaping More Revenues?

Almost every state has jumped at the opportunity to tax online purchases.


As Climate Laws Pass Elsewhere, Oregon Republicans Go to the Extreme to Not

The Trump administration is rolling back carbon dioxide emissions regulations. Meanwhile, states are divided on whether to raise their clean air standards.


Gov. Jay Inslee signing a budget.

Late State Budgets Are Less Common This Year. There's 2 Big Reasons for That.

Still, a few states may miss the July deadline, leading to a government shutdown in some.


COMMENTARY

A Way to Get School Finances Back Under Control

Faced with teacher strikes, many districts are making commitments they can't afford. It may be time to establish state-level GAOs to rein them in.

COMMENTARY

Smaller Cities' Path to Reinvigoration

They have a lot going for them, but they need the kind of infrastructure investment that partnering with financial institutions can provide.

COMMENTARY

It's Been a Rough Year for Mass Transit

With falling ridership and scrapped expansion projects, urban transit faces an uncertain future.

NEWS IN NUMBERS

65 bitcoins

Ransom that hackers demanded from Riviera Beach, Fla., which is equivalent to $600,000. The city paid it. The cyberattack forced local police and fire departments to write 911 calls on paper.

MORE DIGITS

Probation and Parole Violations Are Filling Up Prisons and Costing States Billions

According to the most comprehensive report of its kind, states spend more than $9 billion a year incarcerating people who violate community supervision terms that even corrections officials admit are difficult to comply with.


Home health aide helping an elderly woman.

Trump's Immigration Policies Could Take a Toll on Long-Term Care

Immigrants make up a quarter of the long-term care workforce, which struggles with high turnover. Without them, shortages could worsen and make it harder for people to age at home.

People walking by the Internal Revenue Service building in Washington, D.C.

Final IRS Rules Leave States Few Options for Evading the SALT Cap

"There is something to upset everyone in the IRS rule."


In the State Where Teacher Strikes Started, Lawmakers Aim to Prevent More

The West Virginia Senate passed a bill that would not only punish teachers for protesting but also includes a charter school provision they recently fought to defeat. The House could vote on it as early as Monday.

Is 311 Fair?

A new study examines whether cities respond to complaints as quickly in poor neighborhoods as they do in rich ones.

Supreme Court: Virginia House Lacks Authority to Defend Gerrymandering

The ruling, which united an unusual coalition of justices, could boost Democrats' chances in November.

CONTENT PROVIDED BY OPTUM

How can modern solutions pave a new path to healthcare?

We know how. We are the how.

SEE HOW
A male customer smelling marijuana at a pot shop with a female worker.

Why Illinois' Marijuana Legalization Law Is Different From All Others

It's the first state where the legislature -- not voters -- legalized cannabis sales. But that's not all that makes it unique.

• Will Marijuana and Sports Betting Solve Illinois' Budget Problems?

Can Surge Pricing Cut Energy Use?

California will be the first state where utilities charge more for power used during peak hours.

Nonprofits Don’t Have to Pay Taxes, But Boston Still Hopes They’ll Chip In

Half the city’s land mass is occupied by tax-exempt institutions. Some city councilors say they’re not paying their fair share.

Are Public Employees Safe at Work?

Whether it's violence like the Virginia Beach shooting at a municipal building, or danger due to the nature of the job, government workers lack health and safety protections in nearly half the states.

Right to an Attorney? Most Tenants Face Landlords Without One.

But a handful of cities are starting to provide counsel in civil court.