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The Era of Car-Clogged City Streets Is Over (Contributed)

As cities become denser, the old rationale of designing them around automobiles must give way to a new use of streets that includes walking and micro-mobile solutions. The result: greater efficiency, equity and safety.


New Hampshire Bill Will Allow Multi-Town Broadband System

A common issue with rural broadband expansion is small towns not having enough leverage to establish better Internet service. But legislation could turn the tables, giving communities the authority to form a unified district.

High Schools Are Changing the Playing Field with Esports

With national support and the possibility of college scholarships, a growing number of high schools are organizing their video gaming students into competitive esports teams. But the activity has raised a few concerns.

Oregon to Launch Statewide Procurement Marketplace in 2020

Under a five-year contract with Periscope Holdings, the OregonBuys Marketplace will standardize purchasing across all the state’s agencies, from procurement to payment, giving Oregon a better view into buying activity.

People voting

News Websites with Political Ties Spread Across Michigan

Media organizations with links to partisan political groups are expanding across the state before the 2020 election. Designed to look like conventional news outlets, the sites are backed by political groups.


‘Silver Tsunami’ Makes State Rethink Applications and Tech

With 15,000 Connecticut state workers eligible for retirement in 2022, state departments are turning to online applications and artificial intelligence to quickly fill potential labor gaps.


California Fires Show It’s Private Enterprise, Not Government, That Can’t Get Things Right

If PG&E becomes a public entity, maybe then it will start keeping the public’s interest in the forefront. As stocks drop, fires ravage the state, and anger mounts, it could be in the best interest of the state and utility company.


Capitol building, Richmond, Va.

Suburban Vote This Year Flashes Warning Signs for GOP

Democrats scored gains in numerous once-Republican suburbs in state and local races Tuesday, most notably in Pennsylvania and Virginia. Republican strategists are nervous about that trend continuing into 2020.


Why Governors Are the Only Candidates Voters Will Break Party Ranks to Support

Unlike other federal and state offices, there’s still ‘wiggle room’ for ticket-splitting in contests for governor. Tuesday’s result in Kentucky means there will be a dozen governors whose party lost the last presidential election in their state.


Empowering Students to Ensure a Better Future

Kirsten Baesler's passion for education and students is undeniable. With creativity and determination, she is empowering students by ensuring their voices are heard.

Will More States Adopt Privacy Laws in 2020?

As a new year approaches, myriad states are looking to adopt their own, distinct privacy laws — a fact that leaves many in the business and technology industries anxious about the road ahead.

Is Public Finance Ready to Rely on Blockchain Technology?

Governments often contend with many issues when attempting to link public dollars to real-world outcomes captured by data in disparate systems. EY claims its OpsChain Public Finance Manager will reduce those struggles.

NEWS IN NUMBERS

1,983

The number of people who have retweeted a recent Twitter post by Joshua Maddux who identified a Facebook bug for iOS devices that opened the user’s iPhone camera and ran the app in the background. Facebook responded to the discovery, saying, “We have seen no evidence of photos or videos being uploaded due to this bug. We’re submitting the fix for this to Apple today.” This comes as yet another blow to Facebook as the company has been under severe scrutiny regarding privacy concerns.

MORE DIGITS

Harvard Says Solar’s the Solution Ohio Didn’t Know It Needed

The study reported that replacing the many coal power plants with solar power plants could result in economic and health benefits for the state. But Ohio doesn’t “have a clear path to really making that transition.”


Could the 2020 Census Help Bridge the Digital Divide?

As government agencies and nonprofit groups help prepare communities for the nation’s first high-tech Census, digital inclusion advocates see a chance to bridge digital divides that span well past next year’s count.

Investing in Digital Equity: The Case for Broadband Expansion

With society rapidly digitizing and high-speed Internet access fast becoming a vital utility, government must work to balance the needs of underserved populations with financial realities.


Texas House Speaker Dennis Bonnen Won't Face Criminal Prosecution, Brazoria County DA Says

District Attorney Jeri Yenne called Bonnen's behavior "offensive, lacking in integrity" and "demeaning to other human beings."

Cutting Ties: Virginia’s Bumpy Breakup with Northrop Grumman

Described by CIO Nelson Moe as “groundbreaking” in 2005, the commonwealth has severed its relationship with its former mega-contractor that limited Virginia’s agility in meeting today’s IT needs.

Former Top County CIO Leads With Perseverance

When helping people is your core motivation, failure is not an option.

National Cybersecurity and Communications Integration Center

Cybersecurity and Democracy Collide: Locking Down Elections

The virtual guarantee of foreign meddling in the 2020 election poses a challenge to state and local officials, IT staff included, to protect American democracy. Experts say the keys to success will be cybersecurity, paper trails, risk-limiting audits and inter-agency communication.


Texas House Speaker Dennis Bonnen Won't Seek Reelection After Recording Scandal

By Tuesday morning, more than 30 House Republicans had either called for the speaker's resignation or had stated that they no longer supported him.

Mississippi Audit: Agencies Not Complying with Cybersecurity Law

A recent report from the state auditor's office showed widespread noncompliance with routine cybersecurity protections. The gaps could open the state to unnecessary threats as hackers aggressively target government.

A Pioneer for Women in Politics: She Persists

During a time when it was rare for women to seek office, Jo Ann Davidson ran for city council in 1965. Even though she lost her first election, this was the start of a remarkable career in public service that eventually led her to the Ohio House of Representatives.

COMMENTARY

The Mayoral Balancing Act

Tension between downtowns and neighborhoods isn’t going to go away.

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