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Future in Context

Guy Fawkes and the Plot to Blow Up the United States Capitol

The preparations for President Biden’s as-yet-unscheduled State of the Union address are haunted by a 400-year-old conspiracy to decapitate the British government. What can we learn from the Gunpowder Plot?

By Clay S. Jenkinson, Editor-at-Large  |  March 5, 2021
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THE FUTURE OF What’s Happening Now

Why Judges, Not Lawmakers, Should Rule on Disputed Elections

State legislatures and Congress are ill-suited — and too partisan — for the task of weighing evidence when elections are contested. Judicial supervision of these disputes is the norm in most democracies.

By Kevin Johnson, Election Reformers Network  |  March 5, 2021
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THE FUTURE OF What’s Happening Now

From Washington to Trump: What Is Dereliction of Duty?

When presidents take the oath of office, they are expected to protect America against attack. But what about pandemics and economic depressions? Here’s a brief history of how presidents have handled different threats.

By Lindsay Chervinsky, Historian and Contributor  |  March 4, 2021
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THE FUTURE OF What’s Happening Now

The Important Role of Public Affairs TV in Volatile Times

C-SPAN and its state-level equivalents have been around for decades, quietly transmitting the minutia of government. But with statehouses still in lockdown, public affairs television is more significant than ever.

By Paul W. Taylor, Editor  |  March 4, 2021
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THE FUTURE OF What’s Next

Legislators Battle Whether to Restrict or Expand Voting

In the aftermath of the 2020 election, voting rights are on the minds of legislators who have introduced hundreds of bills that either restrict or expand how voters can cast their ballots.

By Carl Smith, Senior Staff Writer  |  March 3, 2021
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THE FUTURE OF What’s Happening Now

The Year of Governors Living Dangerously

They’ve been in the spotlight over the last 12 months as Washington bucked responsibility to the states. Now many of them are facing harsh critics and challenges to their power.

By Donald F. Kettl, Federalism Columnist  |  March 3, 2021
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THE FUTURE OF Finance

The Myth of ‘Unnecessary’ Federal Aid to State and Local Governments

It's premised on a highly selective interpretation of lagging data, along with narrow assumptions of need.

By Amanda Kass, Government Finance Research Center, and Philip Rocco, Marquette University  |  March 3, 2021
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48%

The proportion of parents who are “worried that my child will be behind when the pandemic is over,” according to a recent poll. Many parents worry their child is missing out on the non-academic aspects that school teaches, with one-quarter of parents concerned that their child is falling behind in “time management” and 22 percent of parents concerned about their child’s socialization and communication skills.

THE FUTURE OF Finance

Why Infrastructure Needs a Bottom-Up Bipartisan Push Now

It’s the only way to get a bill out of Congress before the fall, given the imperative to get COVID relief done first. Governors and mayors need to understand that it’s a game of chess, not checkers.

By Girard Miller, Finance Columnist  |  March 2, 2021
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THE FUTURE OF What’s Happening Now

Cuomo in Context: His Career and Personality Set the Stage for Scandals

After years of leading through intimidation, New York's Democratic governor faces sexual harassment allegations and charges of covering up thousands of deaths.

By Alan Greenblatt, Senior Staff Writer  |  March 1, 2021
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THE FUTURE OF What’s Happening Now

Americans Need Better Internet. States Can Help Pave the Way.

Lawmakers should ensure that cumbersome state and local regulations and review processes don't prevent providers from building out and upgrading the infrastructure that high-speed, reliable connectivity requires.

By Jeffrey Westling, R Street Institute  |  March 1, 2021
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THE FUTURE OF What’s Happening Now

How the Texas Electricity System Produced Low-Cost Power but Left Residents Out in the Cold

The Texas electric power market is designed to give energy companies incentive to sell electricity at the lowest possible cost. That focus helps explain why it collapsed during a historic cold wave.

By Theodore J. Kury, University of Florida  |  March 1, 2021
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Gutenberg to Zuckerberg: A Tale of Two Revolutions

The printing press and social media democratized communication in their respective times. They both turned the order of things on its head — for good, for ill, and forever.

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