THE FUTURE OF Security

Phone Cracking Software Popular Among Local Police Agencies

This week, Governing’s Future of Security looks at police use of smartphone decryption tools, ransomware legislation and election hacking fears.

By Tod Newcombe, Managing Editor  |  January 27, 2020
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THE FUTURE OF Community Design

Kansas City Removes Bus Fee to Encourage Ridership

Kansas City, Mo., will remove the $1.50 bus fare this year to further encourage residents to use the system. But having accessible public transit is only one part of the city’s wider goal of improving quality of life.

By Skip Descant, Government Technology  |  January 25, 2020
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THE FUTURE OF Community Design

Behind the Lens: Pittsburgh's Bridge of Sighs

The Steel City's splendid architectural gem of a bridge — one of 400 in Pittsburgh — has its roots in Venice, Italy, yet was designed by America’s foremost architect of the 19th century.

By David Kidd, Photojournalist and Storyteller  |  January 24, 2020
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THE FUTURE OF Community Design

A River Runs Through It

Ellicott City, Md., has been devastated twice by flooding rivers that traverse the city. But one man has built a homemade warning system he hopes will save property and lives the next time the flood waters rise.

By David Kidd, Photojournalist and Storyteller  |  January 24, 2020
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THE FUTURE OF What’s Happening Now

What Government Gets Wrong About Technology

For too long, tech has been someone else’s problem — something policymakers didn’t believe they needed to think about or even fully understand. It’s time to define what we want from a revolution that’s affecting everything.

By Alan Greenblatt, Senior Staff Writer  |  January 22, 2020
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CIO Uses Courage, Persistence to Uplift Detroit Through Tech

Caring, passionate, and having always pushed back against the status quo, Beth Niblock has used her role as Detroit Chief Information Officer to revitalize the city with technology after a tough period of bankruptcy.

100 seconds

The amount of time left until midnight on the Doomsday Clock after ticking down from two minutes last Thursday. The clock is “a striking metaphor for the precarious state of the world, but most frighteningly, it’s a metaphor backed by rigorous scientific scrutiny.” When the U.S. tested its first hydrogen bomb back in 1953, the Doomsday Clock was also set to less than two minutes until midnight.

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