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Governing Senior Staff Writer Jared Brey

Jared Brey

Senior Staff Writer

Jared Brey is a senior writer for Governing, covering transportation, housing and infrastructure. He previously worked for PlanPhilly, Philadelphia magazine, and Next City, and his work has appeared in the Philadelphia Inquirer, Bloomberg CityLab, Dwell, and other publications. He is a contributing editor at Landscape Architecture Magazine, and he lives in South Philadelphia. Follow him on Twitter at @jaredbrey.

Intercity bus ridership is up and should return to pre-pandemic levels by 2026. Other trends, including the closure of Greyhound stations in big cities such as Philadelphia, are less positive.
Professional sports teams are on the move and they’re leaning on state and local officials to help them. Subsidies exceeding $1 billion per deal are on the table.
Legislatures across the nation are confronting several social issues including crime, drug use, immigration and poverty. These issues will continue to hold resonance, of course, in the November elections.
A new bridge over the Mississippi River in Baton Rouge has been talked about for years. Louisiana is moving ahead with the project, which could cost around $3 billion.
State budgets are on track for modest growth even as federal fiscal recovery funds wane, pension underfunding persists and AI promises (or threatens) to change everything.
The Biden administration wants to help remove all lead service lines in the U.S. within the next decade. A new report from the Center for American Progress highlights progress in states like Wisconsin and Pennsylvania.
What you need to get up to speed in terms of how state lawmakers are addressing education, energy, health, housing and even international affairs.
A few states are proposing massive cash infusions to help struggling transit systems. But most aren’t — at least not yet.
Urban downtowns are navigating a “doom loop” of office vacancy, retail decline and lower transit ridership. Things look both a bit different and somewhat similar in the suburbs.
Last year, New York state lawmakers considered a package of mandates with a goal of 800,000 more units. After that deal fell apart, this year's model will be less ambitious.