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The city wants to offer $100 million in pension obligation bonds, a move that both lowers pension debt and increases the funds’ earning power by providing more money to invest. But the sale is considered risky.
A special two-person team hopes to crack down on the most prolific and violent criminals. By the end of 2020, 305 people had been shot in Denver — a 51 percent increase from the year prior.
As other states introduce legislation restricting educators from teaching about race, Virginia has incorporated more Black history in all history classes, making it an integral part of the American experience.
A survey has found that one out of three renters nationally want to “upsize” their apartments for business reasons or family growth. In South Florida, that has increased the demand for larger rental units.
The average ride-share trip in June cost a little more than the average trip by taxi, which is regulated by the city. That was a reversal from two years earlier when passengers paid nearly $2 more to travel by cab.
Compared to other forms of transit, public buses are cheap, flexible and plentiful. But policymakers aren’t that interested in buses, and ridership is declining. It’s a problem that needs fixing, argues Steven Higashide.
Judges shouldn’t hear cases involving their campaign donors. Though some lawmakers are addressing the issue, only a few states have ethics rules that require judges to avoid hearing such cases.
A $26 billion pharmaceutical settlement would resolve lawsuits by the state attorney general, counties and city governments across the state. But some officials don’t agree with the terms of the settlement and aren’t signing on.
An audit found the California Prison Industry Authority improperly provided nearly $1.3 million in gifts to other state agencies and encouraged the hiring and promotion of friends, relatives and other favored candidates.
The Michigan governor has proposed using $100 million in federal COVID-19 relief funds to build 2,000 affordable housing units across the state. The development would create housing for 6,000 residents and 1,600 jobs.
Photojournalist David Kidd has traveled to nearly every state in the union while on assignment. His keen interest in American history has led to some interesting and unique discoveries about the nation’s past.
Small businesses need affordable commercial space. Federal stimulus funds offer the chance for local governments to get involved in a variety of ways — including becoming landlords themselves.
Mayor Bill de Blasio announced that all 300,000 municipal workers, including police officers, firefighters and teachers, will be required to either get vaccinated or submit to weekly COVID testing.
Job-based visas are in such a high demand that the government has resorted to a lottery-based system to award the documents. Still, only 28 percent of applicants will get a visa in 2022 as compared to 2014.
Due to high state tax collections and large amounts of federal aid, many state legislatures are experiencing massive budget surpluses. But some lawmakers want to start planning for the inevitable downturn now.
“We’re saying we cannot negotiate with you. It’s not legal for us to pay anything.”
Dangerous policies and practices are sidelining public health evidence and authority. With COVID-19 cases and deaths surging, public leaders need to support the experts, tune out the anti-science chorus and encourage vaccinations.
Water may be among the least cyber-defended critical infrastructure sectors. Keeping it safe may include channeling more funds and training to tiny agencies and establishing voluntary guidelines.
Charlie Crist, a Democratic gubernatorial hopeful, criticized Gov. Ron DeSantis for his recent visit to the Texas border while the state’s COVID-19 test positivity rate has nearly tripled in the last three weeks.
With some of the lowest vaccination rates in the nation, state officials are hopeful that a new lead to the Department of Health and Senior Services will update the whole system and make it better, post-COVID.
A new report found that civic engagement, such as participation in elections, number of nonprofits and library usage, is an important factor for determining community development, but this engagement is hard to measure.
The Regional Transportation District’s Accountability Committee issued a report urging the transit agency to attract riders before they establish post-pandemic routines of commuting to work by car, highlighting poor ridership as a top concern.
Intentional or not, untrue information propagating on the Internet threatens democratic institutions and the public good. Emerging tech tools aim to help government combat the threat.
After years of relative quiet, Republican lawmakers have successfully pushed abortion bans, voting restrictions, tax cuts, religious freedom and school choice.
When public officials use words like “black” and “white,” they need to keep in mind the color bias of language and do what they can to eliminate it.
As drought grips most of California, water thefts have increased to record levels. Thieves tap into hydrants, pump water from rivers and break into remote water stations and tanks.
New Yorkers relied on street vendors during the pandemic, but as the city reopens, those essential workers are once again being fined.
The Washington state Legislature passed more than 300 bills last session and many of them become laws this weekend. From drug possession to education, here’s a snapshot of what’s new in the state.
The Connecticut governor appointed the first third of the members of the new Social Equity Council, which will hold a major role in awarding cannabis licenses and distributing the industry revenue to impacted communities.
Organizations across the state spent $25.9 million on lobbying efforts, a slight increase from two years ago. The top lobbying group was pharmaceutical companies; PhRMA alone spent nearly $1.3 million.