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Things will not get better if those of us who see what is going down give in to fear. There are things elected officials and the public in general can do to safeguard our bedrock principles.
2022 is an election year. Republican investigations are continuing in states, while Democrats are convinced the GOP seeks to rig the rules to ensure their party’s victory. Redistricting is nearly complete with the clear loser being competition.
The aging digital infrastructure behind the Department of Public Health’s online dashboard was unable to keep up with the flood of new COVID-19 data caused by the omicron variant, resulting in updates to be several days late.
Elbert County Clerk and Recorder Dallas Schroeder has allegedly copied a voting system’s hard drive and has been summoned for a deposition. This is the second election official to be investigated for a potential security breach.
Ten members of Congress have requested an investigation into the Border Patrol’s evidence collection teams, the latest development into the handling of the 2010 killing of Anastasio Hernández Rojas.
Some legislatures have been banning reporters from their lawmaking chambers. But given how statehouse coverage has changed in recent decades, the reality is that we've simply traded one flawed system for another.
Last year, pension plans enjoyed big returns in the market, bringing their balances back to levels not seen since the Great Recession. They are still $1 trillion short, however.
Police departments across the country suffered a slew of damaging ransomware attacks in 2021. The new year promised more of the same, but what should law enforcement agencies really be concerned with in 2022?
Inflation is back and wages are up, while consumer spending remains strong. Economists expect these elements to drive the economy in 2022. Meanwhile, tax collections look hale and hearty. Tax relief could be coming in some states.
Though the state has been experimenting with smart meters since 2008, utilities have once again refocused on the technology as a way for electric vehicle owners to manage their electricity use.
An Indiana bill would pave the way for the state to set guidelines for nuclear power usage. While the energy is touted as clean and reliable, many worry that it will increase costs for customers.
The bill will provide the Department of Finance and Administration $50,000 for state agencies to assess if they need language access plans so those with limited English skills can access their services.
Nashville is growing remarkably fast — and encountering serious growing pains. The next steps the city takes could mean the difference between transformation or having the infrastructure of an overgrown small town.
The tragedies in Philadelphia and the Bronx have put a spotlight back on the country’s deplorable housing market for the poorest families. Proposals to fix and fund the problem are on the table.
All city technology agencies will now operate under the Office of Technology and Innovation, overseen by Chief Technology Officer Matthew Fraser. Fraser took over the CTO position earlier this month.
Often audacious, these bundled bills attempt to get a lot done in a hurry, loosening scrutiny on the public purse in the meantime.
Irrigation organizations play a crucial behind-the-scenes role in delivering water to farmers. But only one out of every five has an official strategy for responding to drought.
States and localities have been slow to spend federal emergency money.
A team of researchers found 35,000 pairs of existing reservoirs, lakes and old mines in the US that could be turned into long-term energy storage – and they don’t need dams on rivers.
Blue Cross Blue Shield terminated 250 employees earlier this month for not complying with the company’s vaccination deadline. But some employees felt they were wrongfully fired after being denied a religious exemption.
Omicron has hit MARTA, the region’s transit system, hard as drivers get sick or have to quarantine, which can sometimes cause last-minute trip cancellations. Passengers are suffering from the reduced service.
The California governor last year poured $12 billion into homeless housing and services and wants to invest another $1.5 billion next year. But advocates want long-term investments instead of one-time grants.
The practice has become a focus of housing reform but eliminating it might not make much difference if other regulations aren’t considered.
A report from the state’s Department of Environmental Protection found that 27,886 miles of streams were impaired in one or more ways, a 9 percent increase from 2020. Philadelphia’s water is among the state’s worst.
Prior to the pandemic, the state had more people working from home and better Internet access than average, but as remote work becomes increasingly permanent, workers continue to migrate and impact local communities.
Deputies from the Alabama county’s sheriff’s office often fasten monitors on about 25 people weekly and many of those haven’t been convicted of anything. Some say the monitors are financially and emotionally burdensome.
Thousands of teachers are staying home for a week or more at a time. Desperate states are raising pay, changing certification standards and even sending in the National Guard.
Citizen volunteers rescue a stormwater project gone awry in the historic town of Frederick.
As billions for infrastructure flow from Washington, moving away from dependence on the automobile will require new cooperation between federal grantmakers and state and local recipients. Are carless cities in our future?
The bill would require private companies to allow medical, religious and “natural immunity” exemptions for the COVID-19 vaccine and it would allow unvaccinated employees to instead get weekly testing.
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