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Some legislatures are moving to restrict what health departments can do. This ill-advised political interference can cost lives now and aggravate inequities in the post-pandemic era.
During the COVID-19 health crisis, states suspended limitations on telemedicine and scope of practice. A number are now making those changes permanent.
The lawsuit alleges that Washington state's county election system deters a strong Latino vote by splitting a predominantly Latino district into three. The redistricting won’t be confirmed until after the 2020 Census data is released.
Despite having billions more than anticipated, Gov. Gavin Newsom will not allocate any of the surplus budget funds for the bullet train. With many Republicans opposing the rail project, the decision may have been political.
The cyber attack gained access to the department’s computer system that contained sensitive data about two dozen police officers, including social security numbers, fingerprints, birthdates, financial history and more.
It's been with us for nearly four decades, but we still can't definitively answer the question of whether it prevents crime in our cities.
We've priced parking too low for decades. As competition for the curb heats up, here's what needs to change.
As a divided country wrestles with its future, it may be a good time to think about how we constitute a more perfect Union.
In most states and nationwide, collections overcome early pandemic losses.
Gov. Laura Kelly has said she was considering removing the state from federal unemployment bonus payments to encourage workers to return to the workforce. Many Republican states are considering withdrawing the aid.
America’s largest pipeline shut down in the wake of a ransomware attack that triggered a gasoline crisis in cities across the Southeast. It’s just one of several major cyberattacks in recent weeks.
The CDC has updated its coronavirus guidelines to let vaccinated residents resume most activities, indoor and outdoor, without a mask. But some experts want the state to wait another month and see how numbers change.
Antioch, Calif., voted to join the public partnership that will use autonomous electric vehicles to shuttle passengers between public transportation and businesses. The four-city system will be operating by 2030.
States are announcing incentive programs to encourage residents to get vaccinated against COVID-19. What started as small benefits, free doughnuts and beer has grown into significant prizes, such as five chances to win $1 million.
The U.S. was once king of semiconductor manufacturing. Today, not so much. In an interview, Skanda Amarnath discusses what went wrong with our chip-making prowess and if government intervention is needed.
A report analyzes which states are the best for police careers based upon opportunity, training requirements and protections from job hazards. But a trouble-plagued year may spark deeper changes for the future.
The order will increase the amount of shared information on cyberattacks and aims to improve government cybersecurity practices. The order comes just days after Colonial Pipeline temporarily closed due to a cyberattack.
Lawmakers unanimously approved legislation that will allow police to track any cellphone’s location in real time. Warrants are not needed if the officers believe there is risk of death or serious physical harm.
How states choose to regulate insurance and liability for self-driving cars may impact how quickly consumers adopt them, but many questions remain around how and when to set these new policies.
Cities want modern light rail trains and vintage-style streetcars. Most are built by foreign firms. Few know they also are manufactured by an American company with deep roots in Rust-Belt western Pennsylvania.
Two-thirds of Americans over 25 don't have a bachelor’s degree or higher. A Harvard study uncovers inconsistent efforts to give these workers skills for economic mobility and calls for improving the problem.
Some gas stations have run out of fuel as the major fuel supplier, Colonial Pipeline, remains temporarily out of operation due to a cyberattack over the weekend. Officials have urged residents not to hoard fuel.
The new bureau will work to tackle hate crimes, white supremacy and biased policing across the state and will work closely between the community and law enforcement. It will also consider reparations for Black Californians.
Gov. Kevin Stitt signed a law that will allow small “personal delivery devices” to operate on sidewalks and crosswalks, opening the door for robot deliveries. Some believe the pandemic encouraged lawmakers to approve the legislation.
The Senate is considering a bill that would devote billions to create new tech hubs around the country. It faces an uncertain future, since picking winners makes other regions jealous.
Disinformation endangered lives as it disrupted emergency response during the Oregon wildfires last fall. To adequately prevent further floods of disinformation, it may take a “whole of government” approach.
To avoid rebuilding billions of dollars worth of rail infrastructure, transit officials are looking to replace diesel locomotives with battery-powered ones. NJ Transit and LIRR are both testing electric alternatives.
Gov. Gavin Newsom announced this week that the state will double its pandemic rent relief budget to $5.2 billion, using part of the unexpected $38 billion surplus. Details of who will be eligible have not yet been released.
The legislation would raise $3.8 billion over the next 10 years through increased fees on gas and online delivery purchases, but some are concerned that not enough would be invested in climate change proposals.
Digital marriage licenses. Zoom ceremonies. Everyday citizens becoming wedding officiants. Utah County, Utah's online marriage license system became a big hit after COVID-19 shut down most offices that issue marriage licenses.
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