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The continued refusal to accept Donald Trump’s loss in 2020 is fueling an anti-democratic trend as the state heads into a highly competitive Nov. 8 midterm election which, experts worry, could cause lasting damage to institutions.
The Ohio county is re-evaluating its operational and organizational structure to determine how many of the 800 current job openings actually need to be filled for systems to continue to function.
The annual census found that chronic homelessness rose 43 percent since 2020, even as the county and city of Santa Rosa spent an unprecedented $4 million on housing homeless people through the first 15 months of the pandemic.
As one western Florida community celebrates the success of a program to restore what Hurricane Michael took from it, others brace for a storm projected to be among the most damaging to ever strike the state.
The decision of the world’s fifth-largest city to shift road space from cars to other uses has produced increasingly vibrant urban neighborhoods.
We teach schoolchildren that the U.S. Supreme Court is the ultimate arbiter of our laws. But they need to learn that their states’ supreme courts have the final word when it comes to state laws.
Sixty-three percent of likely voters said they would support a ballot measure that would transform the city’s government, including the number of representatives on the City Council and how they are elected.
More than 300,000 DTE and Consumers Energy customers across the state lost power during August as the grid failed to keep up with a growing demand. To prevent future shutdowns, utilities will need to increase their reliability.
Economic uncertainty, caused by high inflation rates, the COVID-19 pandemic and international crises, at the state and national level has prompted Gavin Newsom to reject several bills in an effort to maintain a cushioned budget.
As Prince of Wales, Charles had a lot to say about architecture and planning. But there are things that princes can do that monarchs might not be able to.
The president’s forgiveness of student loans aroused plenty of controversy. State and local governments can help craft a more sustainable federal plan that could help to relieve their own workforce shortages and staffing costs.
The state aims to have 1 out of every 5 vehicles on its roads electric by 2030, yet less than 1 percent of registered vehicles in the state are EVs and just 10 school buses and eight public transit buses are electric.
The State Employees’ Retirement System has sunk to $34.5 billion, a quarterly decrease of 8.5 percent. The system funds more than 70,000 older state and public school retirees with pension payments that haven’t changed since 2004.
The Labor and Workforce Development Agency will spend $480 million over the next three years to expand apprenticeship programs across the state in an effort to help workers increase their salaries.
Residential, commercial and industrial buildings account for significant portions of state and local greenhouse gases, including one-third of Seattle’s and nearly 25 percent of Washington state’s emissions.
Some residents in the Pennsylvania county received letters that stated their “voter history may be in error.” But county officials are reassuring residents that ballot counting and “voter credit” are different things.
Two states with abortion bans extended health coverage after childbirth, joining 23 other states and the District of Columbia. Eight more may follow.
In 1990, a quirky campaign run by the then-upstart music channel MTV encouraged its viewers to Rock the Vote. Now, three decades later, we need a similarly audacious bid to have Americans trust the validity of the vote.
As broadband expansion efforts increase nationwide, digital equity advocates are working to ensure that urban communities are included. New federal funding opportunities are adding fuel to these efforts.
While female candidates still face challenges, voters could elect a record number of women to the state Legislature in November. The roster of female lawmakers could rise to 45 of the 120 seats.
As of July, approximately 440,000 Louisianans have voluntarily left their jobs this year, the highest total for the first seven months of a year since 2000. But experts say mobility signals a healthy economy, albeit a challenging one for employers.
A recent poll found that for 69 percent of likely voters, cost of living, jobs and the economy combined to rank as the highest-priority issue for the upcoming election, with 87 percent ranking cost of living and the economy as the two most important.
A new study from Nature Energy found that electric vehicle drivers should shift to charging their cars during the daytime, either at work or a public charging station, to reduce strain on the electric grid and infrastructure expansion needs.
The Labor Department has increased its previous estimate of pandemic-era unemployment benefits fraud by nearly $30 billion. The agency has opened more than 190,000 investigations and charged more than 1,000 with fraud.
U.S. House leaders diverged from a Senate bill to prevent future attempts to overturn a presidential election by favoring a slightly tougher version. The two bills will need to be reconciled, while maintaining Republican support.
New rules that require measuring greenhouse gas emissions from the transportation sector as well as concerns about air pollution have led to the cancellation of what critics are calling highway “boondoggles.”
We focus on people leaving cities, but we tend to ignore where they came from and what they take with them.
The Nov. 8 election will elect four of the 7-member board for the area’s largest water provider, Santa Clara Valley Water District, which is one of Santa Clara County’s largest government agencies.
Wheat Ridge, Colo., has decided to not pay $5 million in a ransomware operation that forced the city to close City Hall to the public for more than a week. Instead, the city will restore files from viable backups on its own, without the hacker’s help.
A White House fact sheet estimates that 408,700 borrowers across the state are eligible for some form of federal student loan debt forgiveness, 248,900 of whom could get $20,000 wiped. Iowans owe a total of $13.3 billion in student debt.
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