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In the 1930s, the U.S. became adept at building world-leading infrastructure to support its growing competitive economy and social aspirations. Today, the advantage has slipped in favor of China and other players.
Farms across the Midwest are struggling to hire domestic employees. In Illinois, the number of foreign agricultural workers has increased more than 250 percent in the past five years.
An industrial facility in Iceland will join a growing number of projects to remove CO2 from the air and put it underground. But major hurdles, including high costs, remain before this technology can be widely deployed and play a key role in tackling climate change.
With a strong victory in California’s recall, a new poll found 52 percent of registered voters said they would support Gov. Newsom in an election against Larry Elder, while just 30 percent said they’d support Elder.
The attack against the Department of Health and Social Services could have released personal and health information to the hackers. The state will spend $215,000 for free credit monitoring for those who want it.
The four firms that are competing to earn a multimillion-dollar contract to modernize the state’s unemployment system have each experienced problems while working on other states’ unemployment or IT projects.
The law will outlaw coal- and gas-fired electricity by 2045, but it doesn’t address the coal-mining industry. In 2020 alone, coal burning released more than 57 million tons of carbon emissions.
The battles over masks and vaccine mandates threaten the idea, going back to the founders, that surrendering a bit of personal freedom is necessary to secure everyone’s welfare.
Colorado Attorney General Phil Weiser has called for oversight of the department after an investigation following the death of Elijah McClain found patterns of racial bias, excessive force and other misconduct.
The second half of the program will continue replacing 4,300 streetlights with smart LED lights and installing Wi-Fi hot spots across the city. The smart LED lights can also be used to count traffic and detect gunshots.
The state’s Department of Job and Family Services has predicted that it will take until early December to issue a ruling on the massive backlog of unprocessed unemployment benefits appeals.
Mathematicians, social scientists, lawyers and programmers have led the development of a new generation of free tools to make and evaluate redistricting maps. Can they make the process more transparent?
Cities are clashing with state transportation departments on road redesign. In an era of changing preferences, tensions are rising. Maybe it’s time to restore local control.
Thousands of state employees, nearly 8 percent of the state workforce, have filed for exemption from the vaccine mandate, which includes hundreds of state troopers and prison guards.
Gov. Ned Lamont and the state legislative leaders must decide whether to extend the emergency powers related to the coronavirus pandemic that are set to expire at the end of this month.
Republican state lawmakers haven’t responded to voter rights groups’ complaints about the secrecy as they redraw legislative and congressional district boundaries. Some wonder: Why the silence if everything is legal?
CalPERS has yet to recover the approximately $42 million in pension payments to 22,000 dead people, according to an internal audit. About 1,800 CalPERS recipients die each month, and the agency isn’t immediately notified.
California's Democratic governor survived a GOP challenge. That doesn't mean recalls are going away. Technology has made it easier to motivate voters and raise funds nationally.
The right kind of public-private partnerships could liberate billions of dollars for other infrastructure and to address critical urban needs. But it’s important to protect public values.
A new report outlines the economic toll brought on by the pandemic in our largest cities, showing how pre-existing inequities became worse for lower-paid workers, while leaving white-collar workers largely unscathed.
A landmark bill that promises to expand the state’s “green” economy, reduce CO2 emissions and close coal-burning power plants by 2045 has passed through the Legislature and will now move to the governor’s desk.
The City Council has voted to redistribute funds from approximately 200 police officer departures and reinvest it in technology projects and other department needs. $3 million will be used for community-based public safety programs.
The Census Bureau was late generating the numbers, but legislators have seized the opportunity to produce maps in record time with minimal input.
A New Mexico legislative committee is believed to be the first to try the management approach in a lawmaking context. It’s an effort that bears watching, and some lessons are being learned.
Whether they are paving roads damaged by Hurricane Ida or building a next-generation railroad tunnel under the Hudson River, unions, like the Operating Engineers Local 825, expect to be part of the action.
Despite predictions that COVID-19 would crush state tax revenues, most of them didn’t need megabillions in pandemic aid to balance their budgets. But for the most part they seem to be spending the money wisely.
Some residents argue that the urban areas should remain separate from the suburban and rural areas as they represent different lifestyles. Others argue the continued separation of urban areas perpetuates gerrymandering.
Current and former employees have accused the state trial court system of discriminatory practices due to their race. Some workers alleged they were passed over for promotions for white colleagues who were less qualified.
California’s proposed bill that would give farmworkers reliable access to N95 masks to protect them against wildfire smoke exposure, ensuring a safe and healthy work environment. But many say it doesn’t address the root issue.
It’s tempting for a mayor or a governor to swing for the fences, promising to solve every intractable societal problem. But leaders who go for what's realistically achievable are more likely to succeed.
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