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Many contests this year feature old-guard politicians opposing younger progressives. The debates turn on public safety and how to best build post-pandemic economies.
State, local, territorial and tribal entities have used $150 billion from the Coronavirus Relief Fund — part of the CARES Act — for many things. But with the Dec. 31 deadline approaching, some still have a lot left.
The country is long on problems but short on levers that might help lift it out of a quagmire of its own making.
If you see the Tesla Bot as a joke or a harbinger of a dystopian future, you could be missing the real threat, which has more to do with Elon Musk’s power than robots run amok.
But improving healthy and affordable food access goes beyond what’s in the name.
A growing number of countries and companies have pledged to reach net-zero emissions by 2050 or earlier. But there’s a catch – they still plan to keep emitting greenhouse gases.
Mandating vaccines for children attending California public schools is not new but COVID-19 puts state health officials in a uniquely challenging situation that could require them to override more than 100 years of history.
Leaders of several state agencies are seeing large pay increases compared to their predecessors, some getting boosts in the tens of thousands. Officials say they’re trying to achieve parity as compared to other states.
The statewide power outages last February were caused by a lack of weatherization of electrical equipment and issues with natural gas supplies at power plants, according to a new report.
The city has proposed bills that would require landlords to notify tenants of rent increases 180 days in advance and provide relocation assistance for low-income renters. Some worry this could devastate small landlords.
Five cities are leading the way with programs to nurture these homegrown entrepreneurs and fill storefronts emptied by the pandemic.
While private employers add workers, multiple factors hold back return of public noneducation jobs.
Medi-Cal covers more than one-third of the state’s population, but many say it has failed to hold managed care plans accountable. The state now hopes to provide better health care thanks to updated and better-enforced contracts.
Thousands of Connecticut residents were overpaid in unemployment insurance, meaning they now owe millions. But some lawmakers want the state to waive repayment and reimburse the unemployment fund.
The city will visit 20,000 households that experienced backups and flooding in June to provide temporary fixes while the water department develops a plan to rebuild aged infrastructure.
Insults, rejections and other lived experiences can fuel a desire for social change. So can meeting and befriending committed individuals.
The City Council has passed a law that requires a 300-foot buffer around private residences during protests and bans mace, knives and similar items from city facilities. But some worry the new law is overreaching.
The state will build a one-mile stretch of road that will recharge electric vehicles as they drive but details of how, when and where are still unclear. Indiana is working on similar tech, also vying to be the first in the country.
Election officials used to be able to sink into the background but as disinformation spreads officials now must become proactive and transparent about election security and processes, despite zero evidence of fraud.
More than 20,000 custodians statewide could receive a minimum wage increase, employer contribution to union pension plans and bereavement leave, which would generate thousands of dollars in additional wages and benefits.
John Lipscomb is a fierce environmental advocate for one of America’s historic rivers. He and his dog Batu continuously patrol the Hudson and its tributaries, supporting scientific studies in their 36-foot wooden boat.
The Biden administration’s mandate will require state workers to get vaccinated against COVID-19 or undergo weekly testing. Some may decide to leave their job and state to avoid the vaccine.
Despite the hundreds of attempts to break up the state since its founding, none have been successful. The best attempt gained real traction before it got obscured by the Civil War; the most recent was over three years ago.
Mayor Libby Schaaf promised to house 1,500 homeless residents and build permanent affordable housing as well. The city will receive $11.3 million in federal funds for the development.
A new report found four tolling sites had problems correctly counting vehicle axles, billing customers twice and overbilling others with commuter payment plans. The problems could be larger than MDTA wants to admit.
Demand for homeless services is increasing. Scores of communities are finding that when providers work in teams and use better data and systems, they can solve the problem person by person.
Scholars have always placed two New Deal era federal agencies at the center of the racist policy that steered private mortgage lenders away from Black neighborhoods. However, new research paints a different picture.
In 2020, 86 percent of the nation’s police departments reported staffing shortages, including the Polk County Sheriff’s Office. But the lack of officers isn’t due to the pandemic; numbers have been down since 2013.
For many parishes in the Acadiana region, getting adequate Internet speeds is a challenge that has impacted business and residential growth. In some parishes, 1 in 3 homes do not have any broadband access.
The Ohio transit authority, known as RTA, has had to temporarily eliminate some service due to a bus driver shortage. But many of the routes being cut are essential for seniors and riders with disabilities.
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