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State legislators from both sides of the aisle have voted to table the proposed bill that aims to make the state a hub of hydrogen energy. Gov. Lujan Grisham worries that, without the bill, the state may miss its climate goals.
With more electric vehicles on the road in the coming future, state officials worry how they will build and maintain roads with fewer drivers buying into the gas tax. Some are considering fees per mile driven.
The Ohio city’s police dispatchers union has filed an unfair labor practice charge regarding a recent installation of a camera in the dispatch center’s work area, which the union compares to a “spy camera.”
A functioning administrative state is necessary for democracy to work. Weaponizing administrative functions invites ineffectiveness and a cycle of retribution.
The federal infrastructure bill’s passage renewed hopes that Texas would finally get a coastal storm barrier. But Galveston and Houston could still get hit by a hurricane before it is built.
It's an election year, so expect to see legislative action on all things relating to education. Meanwhile, government and business will be competing for talent in a labor market tighter than it’s been for a generation.
The Washington state Supreme Court will consider whether enforcing fares on public transit systems violates passengers’ rights. If upheld, the court’s ruling could have statewide ramifications.
The city joins every county in the state as it signed the billion-dollar deal just ahead of the deadline, following months of pushback. The money will fund treatment services, medicine distribution and educational outreach.
With 44 percent of state residents living in a child-care desert, there aren’t enough options. Child care for two children uses 27 percent of a family’s income. The Tri-Share program aims to reduce those obstacles.
From 1890-1930, they exploded across the American landscape, offering people the chance to own a home just outside the city. Lack of government support curtailed their growth, but these historic neighborhoods serve as models for efficient urban planning.
State lawmakers should be thinking about how to go on one-time spending sprees — such as funding infrastructure projects, including broadband, largely underwritten by the trillion-dollar infrastructure bill.
For decades, American vehicles have been growing heavier and taller. They are also deadlier, killing more pedestrians in the past 10 years. Better regulations and traffic calming can help. But the pace of change is slow.
After a payment issue nearly shut off power to the Buckfield Fire Station, legislators are considering a ban on disconnecting utilities for public safety buildings without a 60-day warning first.
34 community and 40 non-community systems are producing drinking water with high levels of the PFAS contaminants, impacting thousands of state residents. N.J. is the first state to set strict standards for PFAS.
The pilot program aims to encourage electric vehicle adoption among farmers and other commercial customers to help reduce the impacts of climate change, which directly impacts the state’s agriculture.
Things will not get better if those of us who see what is going down give in to fear. There are things elected officials and the public in general can do to safeguard our bedrock principles.
2022 is an election year. Republican investigations are continuing in states, while Democrats are convinced the GOP seeks to rig the rules to ensure their party’s victory. Redistricting is nearly complete with the clear loser being competition.
The aging digital infrastructure behind the Department of Public Health’s online dashboard was unable to keep up with the flood of new COVID-19 data caused by the omicron variant, resulting in updates to be several days late.
Elbert County Clerk and Recorder Dallas Schroeder has allegedly copied a voting system’s hard drive and has been summoned for a deposition. This is the second election official to be investigated for a potential security breach.
Ten members of Congress have requested an investigation into the Border Patrol’s evidence collection teams, the latest development into the handling of the 2010 killing of Anastasio Hernández Rojas.
Some legislatures have been banning reporters from their lawmaking chambers. But given how statehouse coverage has changed in recent decades, the reality is that we've simply traded one flawed system for another.
Last year, pension plans enjoyed big returns in the market, bringing their balances back to levels not seen since the Great Recession. They are still $1 trillion short, however.
Police departments across the country suffered a slew of damaging ransomware attacks in 2021. The new year promised more of the same, but what should law enforcement agencies really be concerned with in 2022?
Inflation is back and wages are up, while consumer spending remains strong. Economists expect these elements to drive the economy in 2022. Meanwhile, tax collections look hale and hearty. Tax relief could be coming in some states.
Though the state has been experimenting with smart meters since 2008, utilities have once again refocused on the technology as a way for electric vehicle owners to manage their electricity use.
An Indiana bill would pave the way for the state to set guidelines for nuclear power usage. While the energy is touted as clean and reliable, many worry that it will increase costs for customers.
The bill will provide the Department of Finance and Administration $50,000 for state agencies to assess if they need language access plans so those with limited English skills can access their services.
Nashville is growing remarkably fast — and encountering serious growing pains. The next steps the city takes could mean the difference between transformation or having the infrastructure of an overgrown small town.
The tragedies in Philadelphia and the Bronx have put a spotlight back on the country’s deplorable housing market for the poorest families. Proposals to fix and fund the problem are on the table.
All city technology agencies will now operate under the Office of Technology and Innovation, overseen by Chief Technology Officer Matthew Fraser. Fraser took over the CTO position earlier this month.
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