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Seattle’s mayor wants to revive the city center by opening much of it to businesses that have long been forbidden. It’s a move toward more lenient zoning that has been gathering steam in other places.
Gov. Kathy Hochul says she and lawmakers have a “conceptual agreement” that includes both tax breaks for developers and some new tenant protections. She failed to win approval of an ambitious housing package last year.
Other countries have dealt with similar challenges in different ways. The Danish model has some elements state and local governments in the U.S. could adapt.
Almost 700 children who were evicted from New York City’s migrant shelters on Jan. 9 are no longer enrolled in the city’s school system. Many educators are worried about how this will impact those students’ futures.
Manufacturing companies are frequently turning to robotics in response to labor shortages, increased strike risks and the need for flexibility with the transition to electric vehicles.
The Alabama city leads the nation with a 235.3 percent increase in reported fraud cases between 2019 and 2023. The city also has 296.6 cases of reported credit card fraud per 100,000 residents.
City and state leaders in the Milwaukee area are addressing a spike in reckless driving in a variety of ways, from increasing penalties to redesigning streets. The city has a goal of eliminating traffic deaths by 2037.
Pharmacists are convenient, accessible and trusted. Improving reimbursements and making permanent the authority they were given for the pandemic will increase immunization rates and save lives.
Supreme court justices in several states have been ruling in cases where conflicts of interest seem clear, including some involving family members. It doesn’t look good at a time of plummeting faith in the judiciary.
The U.S. Supreme Court heard arguments on Monday for a case that challenges the bribery statute and could shape the future of Illinois politics. A decision is expected by late June.
The tech giant’s announcement is pushback against pending legislation that would require companies such as Google to pay a “journalism usage fee” when they sell ads next to new content.
Public schools in Chicopee, Mass., are working with a local ambulance company to train students. They can be qualified as emergency medical techs by the time they graduate.
Detection of avian flu in dairy cows and one sick worker don’t add up to imminent danger for lots of people. But public health officials say the threat shouldn't be taken lightly.
Affordable online advertisements are critical for thousands of brick-and-mortar businesses that need to reach out to national customers to survive. A Nebraska proposal and similar federal legislation would be a serious blow.
Federal tax cuts may be in jeopardy, but some states are reducing the tax burdens on their citizens and businesses. It’s not surprising that millions are moving to states with robust free-market policies — and leaving those that don’t have them.
Last year, 332,000 hearings occurred without a court reporter or an electronic recording device in Los Angeles County Superior Court alone. Without a verbatim recording of what happened, defendants struggle to protect their rights.
Only about 16 percent of Florida adults are up to date on their COVID-19 vaccines, compared to 23 percent nationally. Experts urge the elderly, who make up 91 percent of deaths in the state, to get vaccinated.
The lower number in completed applications for aid has education advocates worried about a smaller fall enrollment this year. An overhaul of the form has caused delays and setbacks across the country.
In the 30 years since Kirk Watson's previous stint as mayor, Austin has gained 400,000 more residents. Watson's changed, too.
More of today's public officials and candidates should remember the principles that Martin Luther King Jr. and his colleagues and supporters put their lives on the line for.
In 1999, the natural cause mortality rate for people ages 25 to 54 in rural areas was only 6 percent higher than for city residents of the same age. By 2019, the gap had widened to 43 percent.
State Supreme Court Justice Ann Walsh Bradley won’t run for re-election in 2025, giving conservatives a better shot at regaining their majority. Bradley was first elected to the court in 1995.
On Thursday Gov. Tate Reeves announced federal approval for the second part of his 2023 proposal for increased reimbursements to state hospitals from Medicaid.
When Raúl Ureña was first elected in 2020, she earned 70 percent of the vote. Now the mayor of the California border town of Calexico faces a recall over homelessness and economic development – but also gender identity.
The City Council unanimously approved a three-year, $815,000 contract with RollKall Technologies. The move comes in direct response to a 2018 audit that criticized the agency’s lack of oversight.
Street safety is increasingly a source of conflict between state and local governments. Houston’s new mayor has paused a series of redesigns.
Many school districts still have a lot of money that could be spent on effective long-term interventions. States should help them build federal dollars into their budgets for years to come.
There’s a movement toward cracking down again on minor offenses. It raises larger questions about what transgressions we should be punishing — and why we should.
The Maryland Protecting Opportunities and Regional Trade Act went into effect immediately after Gov. Wes Moore signed it. The program will assist workers and businesses affected by the Key Bridge collapse.
The state auditor’s office found that a council created to oversee the implementation of homelessness programs has not consistently tracked spending or outcomes.