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The city has made impressive strides in retaining and growing riders on its bus transit system thanks to a free fare program during the pandemic. But sustaining the policy while expanding service could be tricky in the long run.
Vaccines against smallpox during the Revolutionary War may have saved the Continental Army from defeat. It’s one example of how mandates have protected the health of Americans for more than two centuries.
After refusing to take cybersecurity training, Councilman Fred Richardson’s emails were shut down for two weeks, a situation he compared to Jim Crow-era discrimination. Richardson is also a mayoral candidate in the upcoming primary.
Mayor London Breed has agreed to pay $22,792 in city fines to settle allegations that she committed several ethics violations while in office. Breed is the first sitting mayor in the city to settle such a case.
Gov. Andrew Cuomo signed a bill on Monday that would replace the word ‘inmate’ with ‘incarcerated individual.’ The old term is considered derogatory and dehumanizing, within state law. It takes effect immediately.
A report issued by the state attorney general’s office finds that New York’s governor repeatedly touched women and created a culture of retribution.
The state is already home to the largest potable water reuse programs in the world. Massive expansions worth more than $11 billion are in the works to keep supply steady in the face of worsening climate impacts.
Surveys show Americans want more walkable cities and bike riding continues to grow. Yet urban streets are still designed and used like highways. Change is happening, but at a very slow pace, says urban expert Jeff Speck.
The eviction moratorium expired last weekend, and despite pleas from Congress and advocates, the White House has said the CDC cannot extend the order any further, putting millions at risk of losing their housing.
The heat wave that hit Clark County, Wash., has prompted officials to raise their utility demand forecasts and ensure infrastructure upgrades happen soon. The peak demand was 18 percent greater than the previous peak in 2017.
A new study found New Mexico’s renewable energy sector could contribute a multibillion-dollar boost and thousands of jobs to the state’s economy if it receives federal stimulus investments.
Republican and Democratic states aren’t exactly sure what they are for, but they know what they’re against.
Local governments could turn to special assessment districts to cost-effectively assure safety improvements, bypassing occupants’ foot-dragging and dysfunctional homeowners’ associations.
There is a growing movement for raising the federal minimum wage to $15 an hour to help reduce stress on low-wage workers. But a new report reveals that a $15 hourly wage isn’t always livable.
Lawmakers expanded child-care subsidies and passed a new capital-gains tax last year. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, the state is the fifth in the nation for union membership.
Of the state’s nearly 370,000 EVs, 40 percent of them are registered to just four Southern California counties: Los Angeles, Orange, Riverside and San Bernardino. Three electric vehicle startups are located in Irvine.
The autonomous vehicle company Argo AI, along with Ford and Lyft, announced that 1,000 self-driving ride-hail cars would arrive in Miami this winter, worrying many Lyft and Uber drivers about their job security.
Mayor Ben Walsh has proposed using $2 million in federal stimulus funding to plant 3,600 trees over the next three years in an effort to improve social inequalities across the city. Each tree will cost $400 to plant.
Unlike last year, kids will be in classrooms almost everywhere. Politics will interfere with safety measures to protect them against the delta variant, notably mask mandates.
Online medical services are cheaper to deliver than in-person care, but legislatures are mandating reimbursement at the same rates. It’s costly for taxpayers and patients, and it stifles innovation.
The laws prohibit fast-food chains from terminating, suspending or reducing employees’ hours by more than 15 percent without evidence of demonstrated misconduct or poor performance, or without a bona fide economic reason.
The field of 46 candidates includes GOP politicians, a reality TV personality, a YouTuber, a retired detective, a cannabis advocate, several business owners and even a New Age shaman.
It has taken steps to give local policymakers more control over the allocation and distribution of COVID-19 vaccinations, while setting national policies to hasten the availability of vaccines.
As vaccines become more political and case numbers continue to rise, many expect Republican candidates to use the coronavirus pandemic as leverage for their campaigns in the upcoming midterm elections.
The state continues to struggle against unemployment benefits fraud as hackers’ methods evolve. State officials are calling for an audit to determine how to better protect the system.
As businesses begin the return to working in an office building, some aren’t requiring their employees to get vaccinated for fear that they will leave. Many companies are still looking for guidance from state officials.
The county has started requiring its police officers to wear a body camera after launching training courses that began in early July. They expect all officers to finish by October.
A new report ranked which states have the best and worst K-12 public school systems in the nation; Massachusetts came in the top spot. On average, blue states ranked higher than red.
The city wants to offer $100 million in pension obligation bonds, a move that both lowers pension debt and increases the funds’ earning power by providing more money to invest. But the sale is considered risky.
A special two-person team hopes to crack down on the most prolific and violent criminals. By the end of 2020, 305 people had been shot in Denver — a 51 percent increase from the year prior.