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The order will increase the amount of shared information on cyberattacks and aims to improve government cybersecurity practices. The order comes just days after Colonial Pipeline temporarily closed due to a cyberattack.
Lawmakers unanimously approved legislation that will allow police to track any cellphone’s location in real time. Warrants are not needed if the officers believe there is risk of death or serious physical harm.
How states choose to regulate insurance and liability for self-driving cars may impact how quickly consumers adopt them, but many questions remain around how and when to set these new policies.
Cities want modern light rail trains and vintage-style streetcars. Most are built by foreign firms. Few know they also are manufactured by an American company with deep roots in Rust-Belt western Pennsylvania.
Two-thirds of Americans over 25 don't have a bachelor’s degree or higher. A Harvard study uncovers inconsistent efforts to give these workers skills for economic mobility and calls for improving the problem.
Some gas stations have run out of fuel as the major fuel supplier, Colonial Pipeline, remains temporarily out of operation due to a cyberattack over the weekend. Officials have urged residents not to hoard fuel.
The new bureau will work to tackle hate crimes, white supremacy and biased policing across the state and will work closely between the community and law enforcement. It will also consider reparations for Black Californians.
Gov. Kevin Stitt signed a law that will allow small “personal delivery devices” to operate on sidewalks and crosswalks, opening the door for robot deliveries. Some believe the pandemic encouraged lawmakers to approve the legislation.
The Senate is considering a bill that would devote billions to create new tech hubs around the country. It faces an uncertain future, since picking winners makes other regions jealous.
Disinformation endangered lives as it disrupted emergency response during the Oregon wildfires last fall. To adequately prevent further floods of disinformation, it may take a “whole of government” approach.
To avoid rebuilding billions of dollars worth of rail infrastructure, transit officials are looking to replace diesel locomotives with battery-powered ones. NJ Transit and LIRR are both testing electric alternatives.
Gov. Gavin Newsom announced this week that the state will double its pandemic rent relief budget to $5.2 billion, using part of the unexpected $38 billion surplus. Details of who will be eligible have not yet been released.
The legislation would raise $3.8 billion over the next 10 years through increased fees on gas and online delivery purchases, but some are concerned that not enough would be invested in climate change proposals.
Digital marriage licenses. Zoom ceremonies. Everyday citizens becoming wedding officiants. Utah County, Utah's online marriage license system became a big hit after COVID-19 shut down most offices that issue marriage licenses.
High-rise buildings made out of timber have long been judged flimsy and fire-prone. That isn’t true anymore. But their construction depends on how amenable government regulators are to wooden towers.
While Washington politicians argue over the latest White House proposals, governors and local leaders should promote achievable federal plans that would reduce their costs of funding health care.
Colonial Pipeline has taken some of its technology systems down after they were compromised in a security breach. If the pipeline remains shut down for several days, gas prices could increase.
California could have as much as $16.7 billion more in revenue than what was predicted in January. Some of the surplus may be sent back to taxpayers in refunds, helping the governor’s chances in the recall election.
Officials are worried the city could lose 24 percent of its current workforce by mid-2022. Competition from the private sector has hurt recruitment, especially for specialized fields, such as engineering.
It leaves families living in squalid conditions, trapped in segregated neighborhoods. Rather than spending billions on socialized shelter, we need to put money in their pockets to give them choices.
With Americans increasingly unhealthy because of the highly processed foods they eat, there’s more talk about the need for quality over quantity of food.
As the definition of literacy evolves to include digital and technological literacy, libraries are also evolving to include new technologies in their offerings to meet a wide range of community needs.
With Democratic voters already packed into a small number of districts, reducing voter turnout won't really lower the chances of Democrats winning – or help Republicans win.
Ridership dropped by 50 percent last year as stay-at-home orders and COVID-19 concerns kept many people off public transit. Even as the economy begins to reopen, ridership remains still down 45.5 percent.
The bill blocks certain topics in government diversity and inclusion training. Some worry it will discourage discussions on institutional racism and implicit bias.
The U.S. Department of Commerce’s new Tribal Broadband Connectivity Program will provide $1 billion to improve Internet access for tribal governments, colleges and organizations.
The state’s Department of Motor Vehicles has limited the languages available for written driver’s license tests to seven options, removing some of the state’s most-widely spoken languages.
Billions of dollars will be flowing to states and localities from opioid lawsuit settlements and court rulings. They need to set up a framework for dedicating the money to programs that save lives.
Arguments among themselves about concepts like “wokeness” and “cancel culture” are divisive and demonstrate racial insensitivity. A new generation of leaders should be allowed to define and use its own terms.
The U.S. Department of Transportation isn’t considered one of the federal government’s stronger agencies. But change and innovation has happened in recent years and could accelerate under new leadership and with more money.
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