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Twenty-two Republican-leaning states have urged the court to block beneficiaries from suing if a state or municipality denies them services they are eligible for or violates their rights. Many reject the contract argument.
Some are advocating bringing it back. But it doesn’t get many guns off the streets, it exacts a heavy toll on those who are stopped, and it corrodes trust in police.
Changes to Texas’ power grid have improved ERCOT’s ability to keep power flowing during major winter storms, but in an extreme scenario, the grid could still face rolling blackouts, a seasonal assessment shows.
Experts and transit officials agree that hydrogen fuel cell buses could be used on longer distance bus routes and can be refueled much more quickly than some EVs. But there are few fuel cell buses nationwide.
Gov. J.B. Pritzker announced a bipartisan agreement to fill the financial hole in the state’s unemployment insurance trust fund, which once stood at $4.5 billion, that was depleted by the pandemic.
The case alleges that the tech giant has been capturing and selling data from Louisianans, violating the state’s consumer protection and privacy law. A similar lawsuit was settled earlier this year in Illinois for $100 million.
California has the most. Louisiana has the least per capita. But a new report found Vermont, with 139.7 electric vehicle chargers per 100,000 residents, the best state for charging stations.
It’s not just about the dollars but about spending the money effectively. The focus should be on reducing costs for the private companies that provide most of the investment, rather than propping up sickly projects.
The Pennsylvania county is delaying its certification of the Nov. 8 election results because of pending recounts. The interruption has forced the county to miss the state’s deadline for certification.
Black lawmakers started getting elected to the state Legislature in the 1960s, but the General Assembly has been mostly composed of white lawmakers. Next year, at least 83 of the 236 members will be nonwhite.
The Business Outlook Survey found that 75 percent of respondents believe that the state’s leaders have fallen short in improving affordability for businesses; 82 percent said the state is somewhat unaffordable for companies.
It became the biggest city in the U.S. to eliminate fares system-wide in 2020. But Kansas City’s experience has some unique local factors that don’t necessarily point the way for other cities to follow suit.
A museum and memorial in a onetime Confederate capital preserve the memories of slavery, lynching and Jim Crow. Yet too much of that past is still around us.
Nearly one-third of state senators sponsored legislation earlier this year to phase out state income tax over the next 10 years, though the bill is unlikely to pass. The state received $10.8 billion from income taxes last year.
Black Atlantans continue to be left out of the city’s economic success of the past several years, with inequities only exacerbated by inflation. Atlanta has led the nation’s inequality for at least a decade.
In September, the state had nearly 1.03 million job openings, which amounts to almost 1.8 openings for every unemployed resident. Dallas-Fort Worth added 255,000 jobs in the last year, roughly 2.5 times the usual pace.
A maritime high school draws students from every borough and every background. The school's career-themed curriculum is as novel as its location, with an emphasis on the marine sciences.
They face many a myriad of negative outcomes, ranging from homelessness to involvement with the criminal justice system and unplanned pregnancies. But one county’s approach shows promise in helping these youth build better lives.
Former presidents have managed to talk their way out of trouble, even if by the skin of their teeth. There may be a lesson in that for us today.
Many new governors and re-elected incumbents will now consider appointments to lead information technology departments. But an expert cautions IT leadership to resist the temptation to play politics as states’ power balance shifts.
Amid account verification turmoil and warnings of potential outages at Twitter, some agencies say they have no plans to leave, but are alerting users to other social media options and tips for spotting real accounts.
The city’s overall turnout dropped the most of any county in the state, the third consecutive election with voter decline. If the city’s turnout drop had matched the state’s, 84,000 more voters would have cast ballots.
The controversial proposal would also mandate that all new trucks operating around busy railways and ports be zero emission by 2024 and that all diesel trucks be phased out of those areas by 2035.
The region has added 19,500 jobs in October and 255,000 jobs in the 12 months ending in October, far outpacing previous years’ job growth. D-FW also set a new high for total employment in October with nearly 4.19 million workers.
The states want to continue the defense of Title 42 policy, which allows border agents to rapidly “expel” migrants who cross the border without considering their asylum claims, beyond its Dec. 21 end date.
It’s an updated version of the one that will be used to allocate billions in federal funds. Local governments have less than two months to ask for corrections that could affect their portion of the money to improve Internet coverage.
Lots of governors have their eyes on the Oval Office. Most of the action will be among Republicans who will be zeroing in on Democratically controlled cities to score points on issues ranging from immigration to crime to spending.
In the 19th and 20th centuries, more than a dozen states enacted legislation barring Asians from purchasing property. But immigrants and their families used the court system and legal loopholes to fight back.
Written by the Climate Mayors and C40 Cities, it will help local governments take advantage of the Inflation Reduction Act’s historic financial support for climate action.
Petitioners claimed that the board and County Election Bureau breached their duties by mailing official ballots to unverified voters, deleting records, by allowing a third party to control and tabulate mail-in ballots and more.
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