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The idea has come up again and again, and now there’s a flurry of experimentation. But it never seems to take hold.
A new book makes a multi-generational examination of the origin stories of Martin Luther King, Jr., Malcolm X, and James Baldwin to understand how they were shaped and by whom – their mothers.
The pandemic made it easier to get—and keep—food assistance. In some places, those expanded benefits are drawing to a close.
When the rush for unemployment insurance crashed government websites in 2020, we learned how to navigate traffic surges in a crisis. So why weren’t sites prepared to handle vaccine appointments?
The state’s eviction moratorium is coming to an end June 30. Since the earliest days of the pandemic, housing analysts have worried about a wave of evictions whenever the state lifts protections for renters. Carolina Reid, associate professor of city and regional planning at the University of California, Berkeley, has been tracking vulnerable renters throughout the pandemic. She says the state could help renters facing eviction — if enough money gets to them in time.
North America’s largest subway system is run by a board that’s disproportionately controlled by state government. A city-run system has merits, but so far only one mayoral candidate is interested in changing the status quo.
The replacement of the Baltimore and Potomac Tunnel will eliminate a massive bottleneck and save Amtrak and MARC trains an average of 7 hours every weekday. The project will cost $4 billion and will be named after the Maryland abolitionist.
Officials across the state voiced concerns about proposed legislation that would hold the gubernatorial recall election as early as Aug. 24 and would push costs beyond the projected $215 million price tag.
With one of the region’s largest cryptocurrency mining facilities, a Bitcoin ATM operator and a bill that would allow special trusts to hold digital assets, the state could be a center of the growing fintech industry.
After a year of system glitches and jobless claim fraud, the state claims it has improved its system and is ready to verify eligibility again. So far, ESD has sent verification notices to approximately 105,000 claimants.
The primary to succeed Bill de Blasio will be held on Tuesday. No one from the huge field has emerged as a clear favorite, with Andrew Yang fading fast.
Dissatisfied voters targeted election administrators in 2020. Accustomed to working behind the scenes, many were cast as villains and now fear for their personal and professional safety.
Congress and state legislatures dealt with dozens of bills on voter identification and other legislative measures aimed at more full election integrity — but there is no agreement on what a more perfect voting process would look like.
The City Council unanimously approved an ordinance to regulate the police department’s use of “militarized” gear, and the department will be required to submit reports of equipment use and purchases.
Gov. Greg Abbott discussed his plans to spend at least $250 million to continue the construction of a Texas-Mexico border wall. The governor has already started accepting donations for the project.
Texas and 19 other states had challenged the Affordable Care Act. For the third time, the nation's highest court upheld it.
Any community’s civic culture has deep and stubborn roots in local history. But with the right sort of leader, new and innovative attitudes and practices can emerge.
Public officials need the private sector to step up and use its moral and financial clout to counter the right-wing extremists who are bent on ending the American republic.
America’s largest city has a transit system under stress, and an ongoing battle between cars, bikes and pedestrians for control of the streets. Yet mayoral candidates are saying little about the transportation problems.
Mobile, Ala., Mayor Sandy Stimpson has proposed that the city copy Birmingham’s plan to give its full-time and part-time city employees a $5,000 and $2,500 bonus, respectively, for working during the coronavirus pandemic.
The state is scheduled to eliminate the sale of all new gas-powered vehicles by 2035, but many residents are hesitant to switch to an electric vehicle due to range anxiety. Installing new chargers will help.
Six city-owned properties will be considered for affordable housing developments by the city council in an attempt to combat rising land costs. Half of the proposed sites are in wealthier parts of the city.
Stockton emerged from bankruptcy years ago, but a culture of caution lingered that wasn’t conducive to growth. Harry Black, its new city manager, aims to speed resurgence and innovation through data-based plans and programs.
“No industry should feel entitled to use up a human body.”
After several high-profile cyber attacks, fed security officials hope to increase cybersecurity protocols to prevent further attacks. But establishing regulations that are effective and timely isn’t easy.
State lawmakers have proposed a 13-bill bipartisan reform package to better address police accountability and improve training, but it's unclear if there will be a vote on the package before the end of session.
Five years after winning the Smart City competition, Columbus, Ohio, now believes it is better equipped than other cities to address EV implementation, climate change and the digital divide.
Lawmakers are studying whether they can spend part of the $2 billion the state received from the American Rescue Plan Act on prison construction. The state will have until the end of 2024 to use the funds.
Housing and crime round out top urban concerns and mayors are scrambling to use much-needed federal funding as austerity issues recede, according to the latest State of the Cities report from the National League of Cities.
It's been strong for decades, but the poisonous polarization at the federal level has begun to flow downhill, threatening to undermine the service to citizens that is the foundation of that trust.
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