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Any community’s civic culture has deep and stubborn roots in local history. But with the right sort of leader, new and innovative attitudes and practices can emerge.
Public officials need the private sector to step up and use its moral and financial clout to counter the right-wing extremists who are bent on ending the American republic.
America’s largest city has a transit system under stress, and an ongoing battle between cars, bikes and pedestrians for control of the streets. Yet mayoral candidates are saying little about the transportation problems.
Mobile, Ala., Mayor Sandy Stimpson has proposed that the city copy Birmingham’s plan to give its full-time and part-time city employees a $5,000 and $2,500 bonus, respectively, for working during the coronavirus pandemic.
The state is scheduled to eliminate the sale of all new gas-powered vehicles by 2035, but many residents are hesitant to switch to an electric vehicle due to range anxiety. Installing new chargers will help.
Six city-owned properties will be considered for affordable housing developments by the city council in an attempt to combat rising land costs. Half of the proposed sites are in wealthier parts of the city.
Stockton emerged from bankruptcy years ago, but a culture of caution lingered that wasn’t conducive to growth. Harry Black, its new city manager, aims to speed resurgence and innovation through data-based plans and programs.
“No industry should feel entitled to use up a human body.”
After several high-profile cyber attacks, fed security officials hope to increase cybersecurity protocols to prevent further attacks. But establishing regulations that are effective and timely isn’t easy.
State lawmakers have proposed a 13-bill bipartisan reform package to better address police accountability and improve training, but it's unclear if there will be a vote on the package before the end of session.
Five years after winning the Smart City competition, Columbus, Ohio, now believes it is better equipped than other cities to address EV implementation, climate change and the digital divide.
Lawmakers are studying whether they can spend part of the $2 billion the state received from the American Rescue Plan Act on prison construction. The state will have until the end of 2024 to use the funds.
Housing and crime round out top urban concerns and mayors are scrambling to use much-needed federal funding as austerity issues recede, according to the latest State of the Cities report from the National League of Cities.
It's been strong for decades, but the poisonous polarization at the federal level has begun to flow downhill, threatening to undermine the service to citizens that is the foundation of that trust.
Many California tech workers are moving out of the state’s Bay Area and into neighboring Boise, which is driving up housing costs, increasing development and causing resentment among local Idaho residents.
While some argue that the state should save most of the historic budget surplus for the inevitable next recession, others want to spend it ahead of the upcoming midterm elections.
A program has been placing homeless clients into housing while guaranteeing rent, utility payments and damage repairs. But it’s a scramble to get landlords to sign on before the eviction moratorium ends in August.
South Carolina’s gas tax will increase another 2 cents in July to increase funds for road maintenance. But officials predict the state may still need an additional $240 million annually for all of the necessary repairs.
In 1978, one conservative politician sought to remove gay teachers from California schools. A coalition of protestors, along with local and national politicians, moved swiftly to stop him.
Political partisanship is playing out across the country as lawmakers move to change how their states’ supreme courts are elected.
Community colleges are well situated to provide the skills needed to thrive in the evolving post-pandemic economy. States have the resources to provide a tuition-free path right now, but they need to do it right.
Political gridlock and one-term presidents, are there recognizable patterns in how the Constitution plays out as the country moves through and beyond our times?
A new study has found that 68 percent of frontline organizations like food pantries and 80 percent of hunger advocacy organizations believe they should focus more effort on tackling the root causes of food insecurity, including poverty and structural racism within the food system.
The project is essentially an advisory committee designed to promote the state’s history to Texas residents, largely through pamphlets given to people receiving driver’s licenses.
Hackers gained entry into the networks of Colonial Pipeline Co. on April 29 through a virtual private network account, which allowed employees to remotely access the company’s computer network.
Thousands of residents are still filing jobless claims and struggling to use the CONNECT website, but the state has recently ended its contract with the company that was providing 2,000 reps for the call centers.
House Republicans proposed a bill that would make several changes to state elections. While some of the provisions may receive bipartisan support, others, like requiring voter ID, are likely to get pushback from Democrats.
In the first quarter of 2020, the city’s police solved 31.7 percent of major crimes compared to 36.8 percent the year prior. The drop could be attributed to COVID-19 and social unrest caused by the killing of George Floyd.
Building enough charging infrastructure to capture the anticipated economic and health benefits will be an enormous undertaking. But can the country’s power grid handle the strain of so many EVs plugging in on a daily basis?
As Bitcoin gains momentum, some cities, including Los Angeles, Harrisburg and Raleigh, are allowing Bitcoin ATMs. The trend has both advantages and downsides.
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