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The first round of payment distributions for taxpayer funds will happen on Aug. 15. But there is concern that the more than $8 million won’t be enough to pay all the candidates who qualify for public matching between now and February.
Since the state’s red flag law went into effect in 2019, just 228 firearm restraining orders have been granted across the state and 21 in Lake County, home to Highland Park. Some believe more training could increase those numbers.
LaToya Cantrell announced last week that hundreds of unfilled government positions could get permanently cut to help pay for an across-the-board pay increase for the city workforce. But many worry about understaffing issues being exacerbated.
Osage and Franklin counties haven’t supported a Democrat since Lyndon B. Johnson in 1964, and yet in the vote last week, the constitutional amendment to ban abortion failed in both localities.
Tulsa has long relied on oil and gas to fuel its economy. It's created a tech and entertainment ecosystem that turned out to be a perfect fit for the era of remote work.
The U.S needs defined metrics and more data about cyber happenings across the nation, experts say. Otherwise, it’ll struggle to understand which practices and policies are most effective and where to invest more heavily.
Unprecedented influxes of applications and delays in processing due to the pandemic have caused a backlog of millions of unprocessed visas, work permits, green cards and naturalization petitions within the U.S. immigration system.
A report from the World Economic Forum found that women have less capital at their disposal and that female homebuyers cannot afford to buy independently in 34 cities across the nation.
The Colorado River system, which supplies millions of Americans in the Western U.S. with water, has declined to just 39 percent filled in the last two decades. Many cities are already making adjustments to limit water usage.
Just two weeks after the city opened the door for police use of the technology, the council implemented more restrictions on facial recognition use, including a judicial requirement for searches. Some think the city can still do more.
Unlike many serious urban problems, this one is eminently solvable. There’s a growing body of useful research of what works to operate a well-functioning transit system.
Most bridges aren’t built offsite and then moved to where they need to be. But that’s what happened in Detroit with an unusual infrastructure project that also called for saving an iconic music recording studio.
With confidence in election outcomes at an all-time low, where is the evidence that election officials have used their authority to interfere with America’s democratic process?
Higher ed’s complex array of systems creates a large attack surface, and institutions are likely to pay ransom. Meanwhile, K-12 schools struggle with cyber staffing but more often resist extortion, a global report finds.  
The cost of fuel and food items used on a daily basis to help vulnerable New Yorkers has skyrocketed from a year ago, including beef, chicken, eggs and all cleaning products.
The governor frames his position on gender and identity as a response to a movement on the left to rethink gender and sexuality and promote those views to children. His stance has gained national attention.
The pilot mental health program launched last fall in the city and region has helped many people, but restrictions on availability and a lack of providers the teams are able to work with has reduced its effectiveness.
Wanda Vázquez allegedly accepted donations in excess of $300,000 to her political campaign in exchange for favors to a bank executive on the island.
Arizona, Colorado and Nevada are projected to grow by 30 percent or more by 2060, raising fears that demands for water will outstrip supply. Possible fixes include restricting water use and building new pipelines.
Inside politics: Key governor contests are set with abortion as the central issue; a defense of state Senates puts the focus on Nebraska; and, once again, a big number of legislators are facing no competition in elections.
There are time-tested and newer interventions that have a track record of success. All of them are within the power of local officials and policymakers.
The Florida county’s election supervisor, Alan Hays, has claimed that the county’s Republican Party and other groups have perpetuated “outright lies” of voter fraud during the 2020 elections and claims intended to cast doubt on mail voting.
Ohio gubernatorial candidate Nan Whaley has weaponized the anniversary of the 2019 Oregon District mass shooting to highlight Gov. Mike DeWine’s inaction against gun violence. DeWine criticized Whaley’s politicization of the anniversary.
The state has partnered with Wisconsin, Indiana and Michigan to build a 1,000-mile electric vehicle charging circuit along a scenic Lake Michigan tourism route. The network is expected to be completed over the next few years.
A meetup that was intended to showcase farming issues quickly dissolved into a forum in which top state Republicans voiced concern over a Democrat-proposed measure that, Republicans fear, would place financial strain on farmers and families.
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NASCIO’s 2022 State CIO Top Priorities list, for the first time in over a decade, didn’t include costs and budgeting. No. 7 in this year’s list is workforce, but in truth, the entire list reflects the fact that everything about work — the where, why and how — is changing rapidly. Here, we’ll look at the trends shaping the future of work in government.
New incentives included in the Manchin-Schumer “Inflation Reduction Act” could help overcome range anxiety and cost concerns. Meanwhile, states are submitting plans to spend millions of federal dollars on EV charging networks.
It can happen anywhere, and it will fall to the mayor to be the “communicator in chief,” setting the tone for the traumatized community’s immediate response and long-term recovery. The time to prepare is now, and resources are available.
The CHIPS and Science Act is awaiting signature from President Biden after it received approval from Congress last week. Many expect the legislation to be a huge boost to Michigan’s auto industry.
The law includes a “parity” provision that mandates insurance companies cover mental health services the same as they do physical care. But many residents may not know of the change and continue to pay out-of-pocket for covered treatment.
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