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The Missouri governor has issued legal threats against the St. Louis Post-Dispatch after the paper found a state data risk that left 100,000 social security numbers vulnerable, despite the paper not being responsible.
Conspiracy theories are pushing Trump supporters across the state to call for an audit of the 2020 presidential election results to stamp out any risk of voter fraud; Trump won the state by more than 370,000 votes.
State transit officials look to invest in transportation infrastructure to assist economic development and a growing population, including more than $400 million for various transportation projects in Cobb County.
The state’s vote-by-mail number has climbed nearly 220,000 ahead of the November general election. Camden County has the state’s highest rate of participation and will be mailing ballots to all registered voters.
The current system does not service many jurisdictions in the area and isn’t capable of handling the growing demand for mental health response systems. The city will switch away from its current model in 2024.
The expanding legalization of marijuana sales is failing to give entrepreneurs from disadvantaged communities a chance to get into the cannabis business. Policymakers should take a new look at licensing, tax and other policies.
A new report analyzes the home and auto energy use of each state and finds that Utah is the most efficient. Investing in energy efficiency can yield long-term savings for individuals, businesses and governments alike.
The nine-member panel was created a year ago to study reparations for Black residents but is still grappling with who should qualify and what the compensation will look like. The council has until 2022 to report their findings.
Gov. Charlie Baker has filed clean energy legislation that would remove the existing price cap on project proposals in hopes to attract greater investment into the state’s developing offshore wind industry.
A coalition of police officers, firefighters and other city employees have claimed that the city’s COVID-19 vaccine and testing rules are discriminatory. The city has a vaccination rate of approximately 78 percent.
On Tuesday, Republicans picked up an Iowa House seat long held by Democrats. The GOP isn’t scoring tremendous gains but the party’s hold on power at the state level continues to frustrate Democrats.
Unlike some government jobs, public finance positions often pay better than private-sector competitors. But an aging workforce and departures at senior levels present challenges.
We’ve tried taxing drinkers, smokers and soda-guzzlers. Sometimes it helps, improving the public’s health, even if it doesn’t produce a lot of revenue. But it still raises equity and moral issues.
Approximately 44 percent of Texas workers will be required to get a COVID vaccine under the Biden administration’s federal mandate. But for the remainder of workers, the implications of the governor’s order are still unclear.
The federal Bureau of Reclamation and several other water agencies across the west have developed a $38 million program that will help preserve Colorado River water levels. But many worry about long-term solutions.
The state has proposed new greenhouse gas rules that would reduce carbon emissions by 1.5 million metric tons by 2030, the equivalent of removing 300,000 cars from the road. The vote on the proposal could happen as soon as Nov. 18.
The Constitution meant for Congress to pass bills by a simple majority. But the process has changed over the decades, turning the Senate’s cautious view on legislation into a major obstacle that can only be fixed by reform.
Most state CIOs expect remote work to continue and for digital services to keep proliferating. That introduces a host of shifting priorities, including a renewed need for cybersecurity enhancements and identity tools.
With the prospect of major federal funding to expand the social safety net, communities need to plan for investing these resources effectively. Big funding alone doesn’t ensure good program outcomes.
Despite having less bike infrastructure than other neighborhoods, Chicago police issued citations for biking on the sidewalk eight and three times more often in Black and Latino neighborhoods, respectively.
Some say that Michigan is well suited to become the hub for next-gen technologies like semiconductors and electric vehicles, but will need more investment before it outpaces tech hubs in New England and the West.
Years of budget cuts and lack of political support left public health officials without the resources to rapidly contain COVID-19. Brian Castrucci, CEO of the de Beaumont Foundation, discusses what needs to happen now.
Facebook and its ilk bombard us with vitriolic content, and their algorithms help to divide Americans. Local-government leaders need to keep this in mind when they offer up incentives to attract their operations.
Going into next year, the Fed is likely to throttle back policies that have kept rates near zero. That presents opportunities — and risks. Nobody wants to repeat the local government fiscal disasters of not so long ago.
The law, which ensured employees two weeks of COVID-related paid leave, has expired, forcing many low-wage workers, especially those in agriculture, to choose between their health or their salary.
The state is one of 33 across the nation in which a driver’s license may be suspended if you cannot pay traffic-related fines or fees. Research shows that this disproportionately impacts vulnerable populations.
The Ohio city hopes to receive a $222,000 grant to cover most of the costs required to outfit 19 patrol officers over the next five years. It would cost $55,000 annually to maintain the technology after implementation.
The partnership will develop strategies and landing pads in preparation for future electric oversized drone technologies. But some argue that the city’s resources would be better spent on existing transportation infrastructure.
A mobile workforce needs housing options beyond long leases, but regulations stand in the way of short-term rentals.
Fax machines have largely disappeared from private-sector offices, yet remain in many state and local government agencies. Eliminating them will not only save money, but also push forward digital services.
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