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The election-denial movement has permeated into the state’s mainstream, perpetuated by leaders of some county GOP organizations and congressional candidates. But not all Republicans are pleased with the theories.
The city has partnered with CrowdStrike as part of a New York state-created shared services program that will use $30 million to boost local government cyber defenses. The program will save Buffalo $75,000 a year.
At least 32 charities that were not registered with the secretary of state’s office received more than $11 million through earmarks over the last two years. Some argue that this highlights a need for earmark reform.
For approximately 3,000 yellow taxi medallion owners, the city will clear thousands of dollars of debt in an effort to revitalize the industry that was devastated by COVID-19. Those eligible have until Friday to enroll in the loan reduction program.
Burnout, retirements and uncompetitive salaries have exacerbated a growing scarcity of workers in critical job positions for managing infrastructure, transit and disaster preparedness.
There are contemporary lessons to be learned from the way Theodore Roosevelt, then the most popular man in the world, navigated a royal funeral 112 years ago.
A study by Carnegie Mellon University found that if at least 20 percent of cars are autonomous vehicles, traffic systems may start to see the operational improvements these vehicles are expected to bring.
In 2022, leading states are breaking down information silos and assessing the data for more informed decision-making, and elevating efforts to keep all this data secure in a challenging cybersecurity environment.
Gov. Gavin Newsom signed a law on Sept. 27 that forbids California-based companies from giving out geolocation data, search histories and other personal information for out-of-state warrants, including those pertaining to abortions.
New Jersey lawmakers are fast-tracking a bill that would reform the state’s pension law to tighten criteria under which former government workers convicted of on-the-job misconduct should lose some or all of their pension.
Political groups have spent thousands of dollars to sway voters in their favor for measures 112, 113 and 114. One committee spent more than $1.5 million to get Measure 113 on the ballot and another $24,000 since.
Amid growing concerns that election deniers may serve as poll workers to infiltrate the election process, experts assure that there are rules in place that protect the system and the majority of poll workers are there for the right reasons.
As they have in recent terms, the court’s conservative majority may set aside precedents and create major change in areas such as affirmative action and voting rights.
Why are so many candidates deciding they’re better off not debating? Meanwhile, GOP candidates struggle to raise funds, Republicans boost legislative candidates and Texas AG Paxton won’t be served.
Policy decisions that seem to make sense at the national or regional levels should not sacrifice the environmental quality and economic future of communities directly impacted by them.
The Colorado charging station bypasses the requirement for a three-phase power distribution system, which is not easily available in rural electric systems, by using existing infrastructure. Many hope this encourages electric vehicle adoption.
A short-term funding bill from Congress could allot as much as $1 billion to help low-income Americans offset home heating assistance amid rising energy costs. If approved, Connecticut could receive $20 million.
Companies with 15 or more employees will have to list salary ranges for all job postings starting in May 2023. Many expect this transparency to help workers, especially women and people of color, to receive fair pay.
The CEO of PostcardMania, a company based in Clearwater, Fla., has issued an apology to its employees after downplaying the severity of Hurricane Ian and encouraging staff to bring their pets and families to the office and not miss work.
In 1968, thousands of Mexican American high school students in East Los Angeles walked out of classrooms to protest discriminatory and substandard education. Despite mixed results, their demonstration ignited a new civil rights movement.
The continued refusal to accept Donald Trump’s loss in 2020 is fueling an anti-democratic trend as the state heads into a highly competitive Nov. 8 midterm election which, experts worry, could cause lasting damage to institutions.
The Ohio county is re-evaluating its operational and organizational structure to determine how many of the 800 current job openings actually need to be filled for systems to continue to function.
The annual census found that chronic homelessness rose 43 percent since 2020, even as the county and city of Santa Rosa spent an unprecedented $4 million on housing homeless people through the first 15 months of the pandemic.
As one western Florida community celebrates the success of a program to restore what Hurricane Michael took from it, others brace for a storm projected to be among the most damaging to ever strike the state.
The decision of the world’s fifth-largest city to shift road space from cars to other uses has produced increasingly vibrant urban neighborhoods.
We teach schoolchildren that the U.S. Supreme Court is the ultimate arbiter of our laws. But they need to learn that their states’ supreme courts have the final word when it comes to state laws.
Sixty-three percent of likely voters said they would support a ballot measure that would transform the city’s government, including the number of representatives on the City Council and how they are elected.
More than 300,000 DTE and Consumers Energy customers across the state lost power during August as the grid failed to keep up with a growing demand. To prevent future shutdowns, utilities will need to increase their reliability.
Economic uncertainty, caused by high inflation rates, the COVID-19 pandemic and international crises, at the state and national level has prompted Gavin Newsom to reject several bills in an effort to maintain a cushioned budget.
As Prince of Wales, Charles had a lot to say about architecture and planning. But there are things that princes can do that monarchs might not be able to.
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