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The Alaska governor introduced two bills that would create a regulatory framework for geologic storage of carbon dioxide and for selling carbon offset credits, and could earn billions for the state. Many details are still unclear.
These are the issues competing for priority this year as $60 billion earmarked in the Inflation Reduction Act for environmental justice efforts begins to flow into U.S. communities.
Democratic state lawmakers have asked Gov. Hochul to allot $10 billion for climate projects and proposed legislation that would require fossil fuel companies to pay for major storm-related issues and climate resiliency projects.
Data collected from the 35 states with the highest average annual snowfall suggests that while more schools are using remote learning days instead of canceling classes, the traditional snow day is far from extinct.
Historic federal investments aim to improve building efficiency standards. A new report highlights the states that could benefit the most. But updating the codes won’t be quick or easy, say experts.
In Oregon, data centers and cryptocurrency miners would have to adhere to the same standards as big private utilities. If the bill passes, violation of the rules would result in hefty penalties and withheld tax breaks.
They will help fund energy-saving and climate projects for businesses and homeowners. Congress’s approval of the Greenhouse Gas Reduction Fund could supercharge green banks across the nation.
From public health to climate change to immigration, there will be plenty of challenges for our federal system to contend with. But the tensions will be more about social policies and regulation than about money.
While some of the new policies’ impacts may not be immediate, the new laws will change the state’s future when it comes to oil and gas buffer zones, carbon capture and storage, renewable energy and more.
Years-long permitting processes across multiple agencies, community opposition and high costs can result in the state taking a decade to build new electrical infrastructure.
Advocates claim that, to reach New York’s goal of a zero-emission electricity grid by 2040, there must be a push to electrify all new buildings across the state starting in 2024.
The plan would help make steep cuts in harmful emissions and protect public health, but it could come with significant costs to homeowners, businesses and the power grid. New York aims to cut emissions by 40 percent by 2030.
The state aims to cut emissions by 50 percent by 2035 and by 90 percent by 2050. The transportation sector accounts for almost 40 percent of the state’s greenhouse gas emissions. The new rule is based on California’s.
The WorkPlace Inc., and the Northwest Regional Workforce Investment Board have received funding from the EPA to launch environmental careers for students from underserved areas of the state known as brownfields.
A new report from experts at NYU and Harvard law schools outlines the ways state attorneys general can protect communities and workers as the country builds a clean energy economy.
We need to move toward a lower-energy future, but we can’t present it as a punishment.