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Cities could offer to absorb 100 percent of the purchase and installation costs of micro-irrigation systems in exchange for a percentage of the water that farmers would save by making the switch.
The California Coastal Commission denied approval to construct a $1.4 billion plant after 20 years of debate. Gov. Newsom supported the plans, but it wasn’t enough to overcome worries about water costs and environmental damage.
The Colorado River provides water and electricity to 40 million people in the western US, but falling water levels threaten both of those resources.
Agreements negotiated a century ago to share water on Western rivers among states are showing their age in a time of water scarcity.
Smaller cities. Soaring water prices. Scorched desert towns. Arizona confronts a highly uncertain future.
Researchers estimated the state has the potential to substantially boost local water supplies by recycling wastewater and capturing stormwater. California recycles about 23 percent of its municipal wastewater.
Concrete, steel and turbines play an outsize role in the past and future of water in western states.
Irrigation organizations play a crucial behind-the-scenes role in delivering water to farmers. But only one out of every five has an official strategy for responding to drought.
With farms, ranches and rural communities facing unprecedented threats, a worrying trend leads to a critical question: Who owns the water?
State officials urged city residents to avoid drinking and cooking the city’s tap water as testing has revealed high-levels of lead. Benton Harbor is also a majority low-income, Black community.
“We need to protect the people who live here before we let more people come in.”
The federal Bureau of Reclamation and several other water agencies across the west have developed a $38 million program that will help preserve Colorado River water levels. But many worry about long-term solutions.
A new report from the federal government brings urgency to a veteran geologist’s longtime warnings about the crippling of the Colorado River.
The city will visit 20,000 households that experienced backups and flooding in June to provide temporary fixes while the water department develops a plan to rebuild aged infrastructure.
A century-old system of reservoirs, aqueducts and tunnels in the Catskills provides clean water to millions in New York City, some say at the expense of local communities.