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This May Be the Key to Graduating At-Risk Students

It turns out that how long a mentor sticks around can have a huge impact. One organization is working with schools to follow kids from kindergarten to graduation, and it's expanding to more cities.


Amid Opioid Crisis, States Start Embracing Alternative Medicine

Some aren’t just covering yoga and acupuncture but recommending it before prescription drugs.

Despite Slow Revenue Growth, State Spending Is Picking Up

The increase in annual spending is largely due to rising health-care costs and increased investment in transportation.

Is Trump's Presidency Actually Inspiring More Millennials to Run?

Many have predicted it would. But when younger candidates do launch campaigns, it's typically for state or local positions.


A gavel hitting pills.

The Opioid Files: More Than 100 States and Cities Are Suing Drug Companies

Lawsuits are being filed practically every week. Will governments prevail over the pharmaceutical industry like they did the tobacco industry in the 1990s?


Mark Herring waving at a campaign stop.

State AGs Used to Play Nice in Elections. Not Anymore.

2018 will be the first big election year when attorneys general target their peers in other states. Will it hinder the history of bipartisanship among them?


A woman helping a homeless veteran on the street.

The Only U.S. Agency Dedicated to Homelessness Could Be Shut Down

The U.S. Interagency Council on Homelessness helped end veteran homelessness in some places and reduce overall homelessness. The White House and House Republicans want it gone.


Our 2017 Public Officials of the Year

This group of honorees serves as an outstanding example of the strong determination, the bold ideas and the incredible amount of grit it takes to get things done in government.


As Bill de Blasio Enters Second Term, Progressives Push for More

After four years in office, the New York mayor has a mixed reputation among liberals. But he seemingly has a chance to change that.

The Arcane Question That Will Decide the Fate of Florida's Supreme Court

Three of them must retire on the same day Gov. Rick Scott’s term ends. But no one knows who’s replacing them yet -- Scott or his successor?

Tickets? Puh-leez. There Are Lots of New Ways to Pay Bus and Train Fares.

With new technology, passengers get the convenience of using either their phones or a versatile fare card. But making things simpler for customers is no easy task.

NEWS IN NUMBERS

5.2%

Increase in state spending from fiscal 2016 to fiscal 2017, which is more than double last year's growth rate. The states collectively spent nearly $2 trillion.

MORE DIGITS

GOP Tax Plan Puts Billions in Muni Market Savings at Risk

State and local stakeholders were blindsided by an aspect of the tax bill that would eliminate tax-free financing for many large government projects.


COMMENTARY

Why Are Salt Lake City’s Blocks SO Long?

The Mormon Church designed the city in a way that makes its streets a liability -- and an opportunity.

COMMENTARY

First He Reinvented Government. Now He Wants to Reinvent Schools.

In his new book, David Osborne argues the best way to fix the education system is to increase charter schools and create a survival-of-the-fittest system.

COMMENTARY

A Real Opportunity for Evidence-Based Policymaking

A bipartisan proposal in Congress would go a long way toward helping to build smarter government at every level.

In Texas and Beyond, Loopholes Let Domestic Abusers Own Guns

Federal law prohibits convicted domestic abusers like the Sutherland Springs shooter from owning firearms. But enforcing the law requires proper reporting and the help of states, say gun control advocates.

• Mass. Becomes 1st State to Ban Bump Stocks After Las Vegas Massacre

States' Financial Practices Get Graded

And the report card isn't good: Most states failed to balance their budgets without resorting to one-time fixes or underfunding pensions, among other violations.

How Virginia's First Lady Is Leading the Fight Against Child Hunger

“We cannot have 13 million hungry children in the United States of America,” says Dorothy McAuliffe.

Studies Show Voters Need a Graduate-Level Education to Understand Ballot Measures

Ballot language often spurs confusion and lawsuits. Some state election officials are trying to make them easier to understand.

Will Global Warming Make Air Conditioning a Legal Right?

Across the country, prisoners or their families are suing states for heat conditions they argue amount to cruel and unusual punishment.