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The Opioid Crisis' Side Effect That Anyone Can Feel

Dirty needles left behind by drug users have become so prevalent in parks that some public health agencies are leaning on citizens to clean them up.

Man picking up a syringe outside.

Voting Rights for Felons Becoming a Key Issue for Democrats

Florida has emerged as a battleground in the fight over the 6 million people, in and out of jail, who can't vote because they were convicted of a felony.

This Small Southern City Is the Most Innovative in the Country

Fayetteville, N.C., earned the top honors in the annual Equipt to Innovate report, a joint study from Governing and the nonprofit Living Cities.

6 Months Since Trump Declared an Opioid Emergency, What's Changed?

Some health officials say nothing. Members of Congress, meanwhile, are taking matters of money for the drug crisis into their own hands.

How Big Is the Minimum-Wage Workforce in Your State?

Differences in wage laws and costs of living explain why they're more common in some places than others.


Can Cities Make Water Affordable? Detroit Offers Hope, and Disappointment

Since the UN got involved, the city has taken steps to make utility bills more affordable. But 17,000 customers still could lose their service next month.


Washington Governor: 'We Got the Best Weed in the United States'

Appearing on "Real Time with Bill Maher," Jay Inslee gave one of the most glowing reviews from a governor of the marijuana industry.


Supreme Court Could Reshape Texas Political Districts for Midterms

The justices will hear oral arguments on Tuesday in a case over the state's legislative and congressional maps, which have been accused of discriminating against black and Latino voters.


A Whopper of a Court Case: Can Citizens Sue States?

In a handful of states, they can't. A lawsuit involving Burger King was supposed to settle the debate in Arkansas.


'Pedal Pubs' Gain Popularity, Putting Cities on the Spot

Bar-hopping party bikes, which let a dozen or more people pedal through popular destinations, don’t fit neatly under traffic laws.

More States Forcing Prosecutors to Hand Over Evidence -- Even When It Hurts Their Case

The Supreme Court required prosecutors to do this decades ago, but they don't always follow the rules. New York is the latest state to strengthen them.

Would Changing the Rules for Police Change the Outcomes?

In the wake of Stephon Clark's death, California is considering the strictest rules in the country about when deadly force can be used. But they may not impact criminal cases against cops.

NEWS IN NUMBERS

6 months

Jail time teachers in Colorado could get for striking if a recently introduced bill becomes law. The legislation comes at a time when teachers are leaving classrooms across the country to protest low pay and inadequate education funding.

MORE DIGITS

Don't Get Mad, Get Elected: The Rise of the Revenge Candidate

Political novices are running for office at all levels of government -- many driven by anger over their current representatives' policies and behavior.


Automatic Voter Registration Goes Beyond the DMV

The most recent states to adopt the practice are expanding it to agencies that serve disenfranchised populations, including the poor and disabled.

In Terms of Food Stamps, the Farm Bill Has Something for Everyone

The legislation released on Thursday includes changes that could satisfy conservatives and liberals. It does not include most of the changes President Trump proposed, such as drug testing and a Blue Apron-style delivery service.

• The Bipartisan Food Stamp Reforms Congress Won't Talk About

As Fair Housing Act Turns 50, Landmark Law Faces Uncertain Future

Under the Trump administration, and most Republican White Houses, enforcement of the 1968 anti-discrimination law has weakened. Housing advocates say the constantly changing federal approach has held back progress.

Supreme Court Not Sold on Ending Online Sales Tax Ban

The justices pressed attorneys on Tuesday about the potential consequences of overturning the court’s 26-year-old ruling.


Managing Citizen Engagement Overload

When government gets too much of a good thing, can open-source technology help?

Judges Face Growing Threats From Unhappy Politicians

While they're rarely successful, efforts to remove state Supreme Court justices over policy disagreements are becoming more common.

A Major City's Solution to Teachers' Money Problems: Let Them Live at School

Miami is taking the trend of teacher housing one step further than other places. But do teachers want to live where they work -- even if it means cheaper rent?

COMMENTARY

How to Test Your Economic Development Strategy

It’s not about how successful any business is but what the city has left after it leaves.