Search

'People Are Literally Being Poisoned': How Sewage Problems in Alabama Got So Bad -- and Why Other States Should Worry

The state and county have failed to fix the unsanitary conditions for years, and at times threatened to arrest citizens over them. An outbreak of a once-eradicated disease has prompted the United Nations to get involved.


4 States Just Sued Over the Federal Tax Law. Here's Why They Might Lose.

Connecticut, Maryland, New York and New Jersey argue that new GOP tax policies violate states' rights and unduly punish their populations.

How States Are Making It Harder to Leave Unions

Just over two weeks since the Janus ruling, about a third of the affected states have taken actions meant to soften its impact on unions' membership and revenue.

• Why the Janus Ruling Is Especially Bad for Black Women

Silicon Valley Is Helping Cities Test a Radical Anti-Poverty Idea

What if everyone got a paycheck that they didn't work for? It's called universal basic income, and with the help of tech entrepreneurs, Stockton, Calif., is the latest city to test it.

Rhode Island's Governor Isn't a Conventional Democrat. Will That Help or Hurt Her in November?

Gina Raimondo, a former venture capitalist with blue-collar ties who has made job creation her No. 1 priority, could face a tough reelection.


A New Use for Food Trucks: Feeding Hungry Students in the Summer

Instead of making low-income kids travel for meals when school is out, Minneapolis is bringing the food to them.


In Rural America, Violent Crime Reaches Highest Level in a Decade

The loss of jobs and the opioid epidemic are two of the biggest reasons.


It’s Natural Disaster Season. Can Your Government Afford It?

Most states don't know how much they spend on extreme weather events.


With an NBA Assist, All-Star Host City Aims to Help Minority-Owned Businesses

Charlotte, N.C., is using the sporting event as an opportunity to close the investment gaps between businesses owned by white women and people of color.


COMMENTARY

A Model for Agility in the Public Sector

Search and rescue task forces need to deploy at a moment's notice, and they have to be ready for any challenges they may encounter.

COMMENTARY

A Case for the Surveillance State

Flashing police cameras may make neighborhoods feel ominous, but they serve a purpose.

COMMENTARY

What Businesses Should Be Doing for Their Communities

Doing more to help fund urban needs is good for their workers and their profitability. Some communities are insisting that they step up.

NEWS IN NUMBERS

500,000

U.S. voters who had their personal information hacked by Russian military intelligence in 2016. Until recently, U.S. officials said only 90,000 voters -- all in Illinois -- had their data breached by Russians.

MORE DIGITS

The New Gold Rush for Green Bonds

Investors are lining up to buy them to fund environmental projects.

• Are Green Bonds a Better Deal for Governments?

Black, Female and Serving the Public: A Conversation With the Lawmaker Fighting Statehouse Discrimination

Ohio Rep. Emilia Sykes gets stopped by security trying to enter her place of work. She wants others to share their stories of prejudice.

For Lieutenant Governors, Midterms Look Predictable

In the 10 states holding races, only one looks competitive.

Voting Rights Debate Moves From Statehouses to Ballot Boxes

Voters will weigh in this fall on voter registration, campaign finance and redistricting.

Arkansas Gov. Asa Hutchinson

After Medicaid Ruling, Most States Hit Pause But Some Proceed

Work requirements failed their first court test, in Kentucky. The case leaves the legality of other states' policies uncertain, but some of them are moving forward with business as usual anyway.

• The Limits to Trump's Medicaid Freedom for States

The Construction Projects Governments Are (and Aren't) Funding

Spending is up on airports but down or flat for schools, highways and prisons.

Why Alcohol Is Still the Most Dangerous Drug

It's cheaper, legal and kills more people than opioids. But public officials are much more united in the fight against drugs than alcohol.

Thousands of Unfilled Jail Jobs, Millions in Overtime, 'Zero Room for Error'

States across the country are struggling to staff their prisons and jails. The shortages are costing them in overtime -- and lives lost when inmates riot against conditions likely worsened by overworked guards.

After Supreme Court Shake-Up, These State Abortion Laws Could Challenge Roe v. Wade

The retirement of Justice Anthony Kennedy increases the likelihood of extreme restrictions passing legal scrutiny.

• California Abortion Ruling Puts Other States' Laws in Doubt