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Year of the Woman? Not So Fast.

An expert on women in politics dissects the 2018 midterms.

During Obamacare Enrollment in the Trump Era, States Face Greater Challenges

With less federal funding for outreach and advertising, and no more tax penalty for being uninsured, it's harder to convince people to sign up for health care.

Was Amazon's HQ2 Search a Waste of Time for Cities?

State and local officials devoted thousands of hours, and put other projects on hold, to lure the company.

• Why Losing Out on Amazon HQ2 Isn't So Bad for Cities
An eviction notice.

Can Paying for the Poor to Have Lawyers Actually Save a City Money?

Lawyers in Philadelphia think so. They want the city, which is suffering from an eviction crisis, to spend more on helping people fight landlords in court.

• 'There Will Be Evictions': New Smoking Ban Roils Public Housing's Oldest Residents

Federal Tax Reform Fuels Record State Spending

Budget directors are still figuring out how much of the tax law's impact on state revenues was a one-time boost.


Scott Fitzgerald

Sore Losers or Necessary Checks? Wisconsin GOP Seeks to Limit New Democratic Governor's Authority

It wouldn't be the first time lawmakers have attempted to strip a new governor of some power. But it is rare.


Set Up to Fail? How High Schools Aren't Preparing Kids for College

Small schools and high poverty schools are putting their students at the biggest disadvantage, according to a new report.


Tulsa Struggles to Make Amends for a Massacre It Ignored for Nearly a Century

The Oklahoma city's "Black Wall Street" was one of the richest African-American neighborhoods in the country. Then whites burned it to the ground.


COMMENTARY

One Path to Cutting the Costs of Incarceration

A New York City program is showing striking success at keeping young offenders from returning to jail.

COMMENTARY

A Crisis in Motion: America's Transportation Dilemma

Federal policy, and other factors, are disrupting efforts to improve transit and forcing urban planners to make tough choices.

COMMENTARY

In Baltimore, Police Seem Everywhere and Nowhere at Once

The city could be accused of policing too much and too little.

NEWS IN NUMBERS

$12.74 for every $1 spent

Return on investment the city of Philadelphia would get from putting $3.5 million a year toward legal services for low-income renters facing eviction. It would elicit $45.2 million in annual savings, according to the Philadelphia Bar Association.

MORE DIGITS
Father walking with his daughter in school.

'The Single Biggest Risk Factor in Getting Expelled Is Being a Preschooler'

Preschoolers are eight times, on average, more likely to get kicked out. States are starting to notice and intervene.


Does #MeToo Matter? Of 19 State Candidates Facing Accusations, Only 2 Lost

On the heels of Justice Brett Kavanaugh’s controversial confirmation to the U.S. Supreme Court, these results raise questions about how alleged misconduct factors into voters’ decisions.

• Another Historic Night for Women, and Not Just in Congress

What J.B. Pritzker’s Election Means for Illinois

Of all the new governors, few will change the culture of their states as much as him.

First 'Pay for Success' Project for Veterans Underway

The VA is working with states and cities to use the innovative financing approach to help veterans with PTSD find gainful employment. If it's successful, the payoff for investors is big.

Democratic Socialists Rack Up Wins

Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez and Rashida Tlaib made headlines for their congressional wins. But a number of Democratic Socialists also won state-level races this election.


The Man of Tomorrow: As Jerry Brown Leaves Office, He's Still Focused on the Future

Unlike most politicians, California's outgoing governor has made planning ahead a staple of his leadership -- even if it means going against his own party.

Liberals Prevail in State Supreme Court Elections

Moderate-to liberal candidates won in five states, while conservatives were successful in two.

• Amid Supreme Court Impeachments, West Virginia Voters Weaken Judges' Power

With a Divided Congress, States Will Likely Take Up the Slack

With Democrats taking over the U.S. House, Congress may grind to a halt. Red and blue states, meanwhile, will go their separate ways on abortion, taxes, education, health and voting rights.

Man on a computer while getting dialysis.

As Medicaid Work Requirements Spread, More Expected to Lose Health Care

Wisconsin just got approval to implement the new rule, and it will take effect in two other states in January. Meanwhile, more than 8,000 people have lost health insurance in Arkansas -- many who may comply with the rule but not know about it.