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Supreme Court Will Wade Into Clean Water Dispute

A case over a Hawaii wastewater treatment plant could redefine the scope of the federal law that regulates pollution in lakes, rivers, streams and oceans.

Pass. Repeal. Repeat: The GOP Cycle of Defying Voters on Medicaid Expansion

In almost every state where ballot measures to expand Medicaid have passed, Republicans have tried to change the voter-approved laws.

The Growing Need for Opposition Research -- on Yourself -- in Today's Political World

After the blackface scandals involving Virginia politicians, expect more candidates to dig up dirt on themselves while keeping in mind the changing culture of America and the power of the internet.

Anti-Drug Smuggling Policies Are Increasingly Isolating Prisoners

Jails and prisons around the country are replacing in-person visits with video calls, enacting strict mail policies and other regulations that limit inmates' communication with family, friends and lawyers.


With Amazon Out of New York, Some Lawmakers Seek Multistate Ban on Corporate Tax Breaks

Lawmakers in at least a half-dozen states are considering forming a compact in which they would agree to end efforts to lure companies with tax incentives.


Affordable Housing Crisis Reaches a Tipping Point in Charlotte, N.C.

After experiencing explosive growth in recent years, the city is tripling its spending to address the shortage of lower-income units.


California’s New Air Pollution Solution

In an unprecedented move that will cut costs for low-income households and cut emissions for everyone, the state is paying for some homes to install energy-efficient appliances.


COMMENTARY

Data and the Human Side of Criminal Justice

As a project in Long Beach demonstrates, treating people as individuals rather than as statistics can yield big benefits.

COMMENTARY

Want to Attract Talented Workers? Find a Better Way to Tell Your City's Story.

If your community really has a lot to offer, you need to think beyond the press release.

NEWS IN NUMBERS

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Rooms at Trump International Hotel in Washington, D.C., paid for by Maine taxpayers while then-Gov. Paul LePage and his staff were in town to meet with the president and members of Congress. The rooms cost $362 to more than $1,100 a night.

MORE DIGITS

How Housing Policies Keep White Neighborhoods So White (and Black Neighborhoods So Black)

Decades of local zoning regulations and land-use policies have kept racial segregation firmly rooted in place.

• Segregated in the Heartland: An Investigative Series

To Build Support for the Green New Deal, Activists Turn to States

Some states have already adopted their own version of a plan to address climate change while creating jobs. Others are being urged to.

How Nurses Prove the Power of Unions

In an anti-union era, nurses may have found a model for effectively organizing labor.

These Pension Funds Invest Millions in Private Prisons

The American Federation of Teachers wants public pensions to dump their holdings in private prison companies. But some argue politics shouldn't guide investment decisions.

How Bad Is America's Infrastructure Crisis? Maybe Not As Bad As It Seems.

While the transportation industry is pushing Congress to pass a new infrastructure plan, a Brown University economist warns that new construction might not get the bang-for-the-buck that proponents claim.

• State, Local Leaders Take Infrastructure Pleas to Congress

What Polarized Government Means for Tax Policy in 2019

A total of 37 states are under one-party control. While that usually means legislation moves quickly, it doesn't always equate to better fiscal policies.

States Push the Limits of Abortion Rights and Restrictions

While conservative lawmakers push "heartbeat" bills that could challenge Roe v. Wade in court, liberals are pushing legislation that allows late-term abortions during pregnancies with severe health complications.

Some Suburban State Lawmakers Are Leaving the GOP

Since the midterm elections, Republican legislators in California, Kansas and New Jersey have switched to the Democratic party.

Planning for Detention: How 2 States Help Immigrant Children Stay Out of Foster Care

The parents of at least a quarter of a million kids are at risk of deportation. In case that happens, lawmakers are adding protections -- with bipartisan support -- for the children left behind.

• Mayors: Immigration Reform Would Take a Day If We Were in Charge