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To Pay Minimum Wage or Not? Debate Over Tipped Workers Heads to D.C.

There's a growing movement to eliminate the so-called tip credit for bartenders and servers. Washington, D.C., could be next to outlaw the practice.


For State Budgets, What a Difference 6 Months Make

Thanks in large part to a steady economy, states are finishing 2018 better than they expected.

For New Generation of Black Mayors, Focus Is on Balance

San Francisco just elected its first black female mayor at a time when the number of big-city black mayors has been on the decline. Their leadership style has changed, too.

Think Your State Is Ready for the Next Recession? Better Check This Fund First.

State unemployment insurance trust funds were decimated during the last recession. A decade later, many still don't have the funds to weather the next downturn.

The Architecture Critic Who Wants to Remake Los Angeles

The city's new and first chief design officer comes to the job from the Los Angeles Times.


Maine Tests a New Way of Voting, and Opts to Keep It

On Tuesday, the state became the first to use ranked-choice voting, a system that could prevent “spoiler” candidates from causing havoc in crowded races.


Beyond Books: How Libraries Are the Latest Front in the Opioid Fight

Libraries across the country are training their staff to administer the drug that can reverse an overdose.


Amid Opioid Crisis, Drug Take-Backs Gain Popularity

A change in federal law lets more than just law enforcement agencies collect unused and unwanted pills.


The Importance (and Neglect) of America's 'Middle Neighborhoods'

When a neighborhood isn't rich -- and isn't poor -- government tends to forget about it.


COMMENTARY

Programs Like D.A.R.E. and Scared Straight Don't Work. Why Do States Keep Funding Them?

There's a better way for governments to focus on effective initiatives.

COMMENTARY

The Governors’ Encouraging Embrace of Sensible Tax Policies

More of them are calling for the lower rates and prudent spending that fuel economic vitality.

COMMENTARY

Inclusive Growth and the Happiness Factor

Tracking residents' feelings of well-being can guide cities toward policies that create opportunities for everybody.

NEWS IN NUMBERS

More than 100

Confederate monuments and symbols that have been taken down since 2015, when a white supremacist killed nine African-Americans in a Charleston, S.C., church. Roughly 1,700 still stand in public spaces.

MORE DIGITS

Where Evictions Are Most Common

A new database provides the first-ever national look at evictions. It shows that they happen more often than you think in places you might not expect.


As Storms Worsen, Many Coastal States Aren't Prepared

Lax building codes and poor enforcement are a big problem in some places.

Why Eric Garcetti Thinks America Needs a Mayor in the White House

"It is America's cities that are here, ready to save Washington," says the Los Angeles mayor and potential 2020 candidate.

These Smarter Stoplights Could Be Lifesavers

New traffic signals in Detroit are designed to help pedestrians, cyclists and ambulances get through intersections, while helping traffic planners test safety improvements quickly.

HealthCare.gov

'Medicaid-for-All' Rapidly Gains Interest in the States

More than a dozen states either have or are still considering the idea of letting people buy Medicaid -- regardless of how much money they make.

• Virginia Just Voted to Expand Medicaid. These States Could Be Next.

How to Calculate What Opioid Overdoses Cost Government

New research provides a formula to help cities and counties know what to expect, financially, when drug deaths spike.

Why Liberals Are Mad That Conservatives Want to Exempt Some People From Work Requirements

Several states are considering exemptions from Medicaid work requirements that would disproportionately impact black and white people.

After Flint, Michigan Pushes Toughest Lead Water Rules in the Country

Michigan regulators want to eliminate lead service lines by 2040. But water utilities say that would be too costly, unrealistic and maybe even unnecessary.

With Shootings on the Rise, Schools Turn to 'Active Shooter' Insurance

Gun violence costs lives -- and money. The financial burden can overwhelm governments, especially when they're small or struggling.

• After Shootings and Hurricanes, Where Are the School Counselors?