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Transportation

Covering topics such as commuter rail, intercity rail, electric vehicles, mass transit and streets and highways.

More frequent service in low-income neighborhoods, fewer buses to affluent areas, even fare-free transit, are all on the table as transit agencies try to figure out the future, according to a new report from the Urban Institute.
The state’s transportation section is not on track to meet its aggressive climate goals of reducing emissions by 45 percent below 1990 levels by 2035. By the end of 2020, the state had just 32,000 registered zero-emission vehicles.
Prior to COVID, San Antonio had allowed as many as 16,000 scooters to operate on city streets but now the allowance has dropped to just 2,000. The scooter industry may be here to stay, but not without change.
Tennessee is projected to collect $655.2 million in the 2022 fiscal year through its gas and diesel taxes. As gas-powered vehicles give way to EVs, the state will need to make up the lost fuel-tax revenue.
The transit agency normally employs about 2,300, but is currently down about 150 workers, forcing it to trim services for dozens of bus routes. It is offering $2,000 hiring bonuses and may consider rehiring retired operators.
The project will extend the Q line 1.6 miles from its current northern terminus, costing a rate of $3.9 billion per mile. Gov. Hochul has said the money would soon come from Biden’s infrastructure bill.
In 1918, with the Spanish flu raging, workers had little choice but to continue riding the trams and trains. Today, at least in America, they can work from home or ride alone in their car.
To accelerate the transition to electric vehicles, every burg along our “blue highways” is going to need a place for motorists to plug in. For states, that means tax credits, matching grants or similar incentives. But we’re not talking big money.
The state hopes to have as many as 150,000 electric vehicles on the road by 2025, but it still has a long way to go. For some localities, switching municipal vehicles to EVs can signify to residents that the town is serious about reducing emissions.
The nine-station light rail line will connect some of the region’s most popular areas with hopes of providing greater access to jobs, health care and educational opportunities. The 11-mile trolley line cost nearly $2.2 billion.