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The Future of What’s Happening Now

The cybersecurity professor who confirmed the vulnerability in the state’s computer system that left thousands of social security numbers at risk is requesting that the governor apologize to those who found the flaw.
The billions in recovery funds flowing from Washington should be used to build local economies from the bottom up with a focus on justice and equity, rather than counting on trickle-down strategies that have failed.
The electric car company received a warm welcome from the Lone Star State when it moved its headquarters from California just a few months ago. But some state regulations could hinder the company’s success.
One day after the city’s vaccine mandate went into effect, police officers and firefighters are unable to report to work for not being vaccinated. Some have filed for an exemption while others are facing separation.
The project uses bacteria to remove more than 99 percent of ammonia from sewer water, which is part of a larger effort to ensure clean water quality and allow for potential recycling, which will increase drought resilience.
When it comes to pro sports, public officials are constantly dealing with issues from social equity to neighborhood development to taxpayer subsidies. Nothing illustrates these issues better than Atlanta’s long relationship with the Braves.
State and local governments should devote a substantial share of the billions in opioid settlement funds to get victims of the epidemic housed in settings where they can get the help they need to recover.
After a summer of devastating wildfires, many parts of California are expecting rain over the next several weeks. The early precipitation would end the fire season but could cause severe flooding.
They are resilient, having survived political, economic and environmental turmoil in Haiti. Yet, we don’t like to admit them to our country, and we treat them miserably if they get here.
Baltimore City and County vaccine mandate has gone into effect, but vaccine rate information for several police and fire departments in the area is incomplete or unavailable. Maryland’s vaccination rate is at more than 80 percent.
State officials worry that the few programmers who know how to operate the antiquated system will soon retire, leaving many of the state’s critical functions inaccessible. It’s also a growing cybersecurity risk.
The state received a warning from the federal government in May 2020 to avoid overly lenient qualifications for pandemic unemployment assistance. The state didn’t update its requirements until June 2021.
Analysts attribute the surge in background checks for firearm purchases to a fear of COVID-related closures, a summer of protests and a contentious presidential election in the fall. But the increase in purchases has created shortages.
A preliminary estimate shows that the Caldor Fire cost tens of millions in lost economic activity. Wildfires, and the economic disruption they cause, have a large economic impact. But right now, California has a mostly incomplete picture of how much fires cost the state each year.
Conspiracy theories are pushing Trump supporters across the state to call for an audit of the 2020 presidential election results to stamp out any risk of voter fraud; Trump won the state by more than 370,000 votes.
The state’s vote-by-mail number has climbed nearly 220,000 ahead of the November general election. Camden County has the state’s highest rate of participation and will be mailing ballots to all registered voters.
The expanding legalization of marijuana sales is failing to give entrepreneurs from disadvantaged communities a chance to get into the cannabis business. Policymakers should take a new look at licensing, tax and other policies.
A new report analyzes the home and auto energy use of each state and finds that Utah is the most efficient. Investing in energy efficiency can yield long-term savings for individuals, businesses and governments alike.
The nine-member panel was created a year ago to study reparations for Black residents but is still grappling with who should qualify and what the compensation will look like. The council has until 2022 to report their findings.
A coalition of police officers, firefighters and other city employees have claimed that the city’s COVID-19 vaccine and testing rules are discriminatory. The city has a vaccination rate of approximately 78 percent.
On Tuesday, Republicans picked up an Iowa House seat long held by Democrats. The GOP isn’t scoring tremendous gains but the party’s hold on power at the state level continues to frustrate Democrats.
Approximately 44 percent of Texas workers will be required to get a COVID vaccine under the Biden administration’s federal mandate. But for the remainder of workers, the implications of the governor’s order are still unclear.
The federal Bureau of Reclamation and several other water agencies across the west have developed a $38 million program that will help preserve Colorado River water levels. But many worry about long-term solutions.
With the prospect of major federal funding to expand the social safety net, communities need to plan for investing these resources effectively. Big funding alone doesn’t ensure good program outcomes.
Years of budget cuts and lack of political support left public health officials without the resources to rapidly contain COVID-19. Brian Castrucci, CEO of the de Beaumont Foundation, discusses what needs to happen now.
Facebook and its ilk bombard us with vitriolic content, and their algorithms help to divide Americans. Local-government leaders need to keep this in mind when they offer up incentives to attract their operations.
The Ohio city hopes to receive a $222,000 grant to cover most of the costs required to outfit 19 patrol officers over the next five years. It would cost $55,000 annually to maintain the technology after implementation.
A mobile workforce needs housing options beyond long leases, but regulations stand in the way of short-term rentals.
Fax machines have largely disappeared from private-sector offices, yet remain in many state and local government agencies. Eliminating them will not only save money, but also push forward digital services.
Four years after Hurricane Maria wreaked havoc on Puerto Rico, federal money to rebuild its electricity system is finally about to flow. But it may not deliver what islanders want.
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