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Automation

States like Arizona and Texas have positioned themselves as hubs for autonomous vehicle testing and deployments, in part, by creating regulatory landscapes that are easy for new companies to navigate.
Ford, Lyft and Argo AI announced that they would begin deploying autonomous ‘robotaxis’ as early as this winter. But for now, the self-driving vehicles will have a safety driver and technology monitor in the front seats.
Before self-driving vehicles can be safely deployed in cities, the technology must learn all of the diversities of driving and pedestrian behavior, like the technically illegal “Pittsburgh left.”
The Big Easy isn’t the only city using chatbots to bridge equity gaps and provide more residents with the answers they seek on a 24/7 basis. Smarter chatbots are finding their places in public service.
Antioch, Calif., voted to join the public partnership that will use autonomous electric vehicles to shuttle passengers between public transportation and businesses. The four-city system will be operating by 2030.
How states choose to regulate insurance and liability for self-driving cars may impact how quickly consumers adopt them, but many questions remain around how and when to set these new policies.
Gov. Kevin Stitt signed a law that will allow small “personal delivery devices” to operate on sidewalks and crosswalks, opening the door for robot deliveries. Some believe the pandemic encouraged lawmakers to approve the legislation.