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The Future of What’s Next

The state will build a one-mile stretch of road that will recharge electric vehicles as they drive but details of how, when and where are still unclear. Indiana is working on similar tech, also vying to be the first in the country.
An industrial facility in Iceland will join a growing number of projects to remove CO2 from the air and put it underground. But major hurdles, including high costs, remain before this technology can be widely deployed and play a key role in tackling climate change.
The law will outlaw coal- and gas-fired electricity by 2045, but it doesn’t address the coal-mining industry. In 2020 alone, coal burning released more than 57 million tons of carbon emissions.
A landmark bill that promises to expand the state’s “green” economy, reduce CO2 emissions and close coal-burning power plants by 2045 has passed through the Legislature and will now move to the governor’s desk.
With three statewide measures on the Nov. 2 ballot, voters will have to decide on a retail marijuana sales tax increase, a property tax cut and legislative oversight of state spending.
The proposed rail link between Baltimore and Washington would provide a 15-minute ride and eventually extend to New York. Opponents of the $10 billion project cheered the Federal Railroad Administration’s notice.
Hotter days are increasing in Baltimore and can put vulnerable populations at risk. To combat the heat, the city is opening cooling centers, replacing blacktop with heat reflective material and expanding tree coverage.
The infrastructure bill being debated in Congress looks like a small but genuine down payment on a more climate-friendly transportation sector and electric power grid. What comes next is crucial.
The Biden Administration has promised to double offshore wind energy to 30 gigawatts by 2030 and offshore wind costs are expected to fall by 55 percent by that same year. But not all agree that it’s the best solution.
COVID-19 forced health care to offer appointments by phone and video. The state’s medical board has extended the use of telehealth until the end of the year, but may make the option permanent.
The U.S. has been pushing the electrification of appliances, cars and other household goods to cut back on carbon emissions. But shifting away from fossil fuels will require expanding the power grid and large upfront costs.
The proposed $4.1 billion desalination project would add as much as $90 to the typical Tucson-area monthly water bill, but if the region grows as predicted, it may be necessary. Many expect it could take decades to get approval.
One Ford plant converted into an electrification center and now makes parts for hybrid and electric vehicles, which allowed it to keep its workers. But the conversion hasn’t come without its challenges.
The Tennessee utility has promised that its entire fleet of passenger cars as well as at least half of its pickup and light cargo trucks will be converted to electric vehicles by 2030, in an effort to help electrify the region.
The massive bill has proposed funding to mitigate climate change and incentivize renewable energy. Many are wondering how these plans will impact the state, since it depends heavily on oil and gas production.
The national passenger railroad needs to rebuild its ridership. Lower fares seem like a surefire way to lure old and new riders. But greater reliability and faster speeds are factors too.
Cities like New York and Columbus, Ohio, have made significant headway in converting their fleets to electric vehicles, helping to push along the industry toward electrifying more than just cars and trucks.
Most lithium-ion batteries used in EVs today will last between 11 and 13 years. But eventually they stop working, creating millions of tons of battery waste per year. Recycling is difficult but potentially profitable.
The state is already home to the largest potable water reuse programs in the world. Massive expansions worth more than $11 billion are in the works to keep supply steady in the face of worsening climate impacts.
The heat wave that hit Clark County, Wash., has prompted officials to raise their utility demand forecasts and ensure infrastructure upgrades happen soon. The peak demand was 18 percent greater than the previous peak in 2017.
A new study found New Mexico’s renewable energy sector could contribute a multibillion-dollar boost and thousands of jobs to the state’s economy if it receives federal stimulus investments.
Of the state’s nearly 370,000 EVs, 40 percent of them are registered to just four Southern California counties: Los Angeles, Orange, Riverside and San Bernardino. Three electric vehicle startups are located in Irvine.
States like Arizona and Texas have positioned themselves as hubs for autonomous vehicle testing and deployments, in part, by creating regulatory landscapes that are easy for new companies to navigate.
The technology is taking root in the region, with states like Wyoming and Colorado opening doors to developers and agencies. But potential technical and regulatory barriers need to be addressed.
The state recently passed a clean energy package that will require the two largest utilities to provide 100 percent clean electricity by 2040. But the utilities don’t have a plan as to how they will achieve the ambitious goal.
Ford, Lyft and Argo AI announced that they would begin deploying autonomous ‘robotaxis’ as early as this winter. But for now, the self-driving vehicles will have a safety driver and technology monitor in the front seats.
The state will use some of the funds from the multibillion-dollar settlement with Volkswagen to build 60 fast-charging electric vehicle stations to encourage residents to switch to EVs.
More and more states are rolling out digital driver’s licenses, and experts see that trend continuing as federal standards take shape and citizens embrace an improved government experience.
A new study found that adopting electric vehicles more quickly and increasing the amount of renewable energy could nearly eliminate CO2 emissions from passenger and freight vehicles on Oahu by 2050.
The $3.4 billion contract with the Sacramento-based company will begin in 2024 and provide Amtrak with at least 73 new hybrid battery trains. Siemens Mobility claims the new trains will increase sustainability and comfort.
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