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Rail

Whether they are paving roads damaged by Hurricane Ida or building a next-generation railroad tunnel under the Hudson River, unions, like the Operating Engineers Local 825, expect to be part of the action.
The proposed rail link between Baltimore and Washington would provide a 15-minute ride and eventually extend to New York. Opponents of the $10 billion project cheered the Federal Railroad Administration’s notice.
Unlike China, American roads and transport systems have been around for too many decades. We need to fix them, not dream of gleaming new ones.
Increased bus and train frequency coupled with fare cuts will take place next month in a bold move by the transit system to woo back old riders and attract new ones. It could be a model for other transit systems.
The national passenger railroad needs to rebuild its ridership. Lower fares seem like a surefire way to lure old and new riders. But greater reliability and faster speeds are factors too.
North America’s largest subway system is run by a board that’s disproportionately controlled by state government. A city-run system has merits, but so far only one mayoral candidate is interested in changing the status quo.
The replacement of the Baltimore and Potomac Tunnel will eliminate a massive bottleneck and save Amtrak and MARC trains an average of 7 hours every weekday. The project will cost $4 billion and will be named after the Maryland abolitionist.
President Biden claims that rail travel is “environmentally, a lifesaver” and has proposed giving Amtrak $80 billion over eight years to support it as a green travel option. But is it really green if trains still run on diesel?
The pandemic has broken commuter rail’s business model, which relies on boutique services for white collar workers. Fixing it means more trains, better platforms, high-tech fare systems and fewer workers. Can it be done?
Cities want modern light rail trains and vintage-style streetcars. Most are built by foreign firms. Few know they also are manufactured by an American company with deep roots in Rust-Belt western Pennsylvania.