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Jake Blumgart.jpg

Jake Blumgart

Senior Staff Writer

Jake Blumgart is a senior writer for Governing and covers transportation and infrastructure. He lives in Philadelphia. Follow him on Twitter @jblumgart

A new report outlines the economic toll brought on by the pandemic in our largest cities, showing how pre-existing inequities became worse for lower-paid workers, while leaving white-collar workers largely unscathed.
Whether they are paving roads damaged by Hurricane Ida or building a next-generation railroad tunnel under the Hudson River, unions, like the Operating Engineers Local 825, expect to be part of the action.
With the city’s transit system badly flooded by the hurricane’s rains, calls have grown to increase capital spending now to upgrade subways and buses. But fees from the road tolling program are many months away.
Transportation and housing advocates are becoming fed up with the review process, which can easily delay or kill a project. They say it puts too much power in the hands of a few privileged citizens.
A new report finds that the wear and tear on our highway system has greater costs than were previously understood, implying a need for more transportation infrastructure investment, especially for road maintenance.
Increased bus and train frequency coupled with fare cuts will take place next month in a bold move by the transit system to woo back old riders and attract new ones. It could be a model for other transit systems.
The pandemic tested government’s ability to deliver services with mixed results. Now, the Biden administration wants to give more benefits and rebuild infrastructure. Will government succeed and regain public trust?
The national passenger railroad needs to rebuild its ridership. Lower fares seem like a surefire way to lure old and new riders. But greater reliability and faster speeds are factors too.
The city has made impressive strides in retaining and growing riders on its bus transit system thanks to a free fare program during the pandemic. But sustaining the policy while expanding service could be tricky in the long run.
Surveys show Americans want more walkable cities and bike riding continues to grow. Yet urban streets are still designed and used like highways. Change is happening, but at a very slow pace, says urban expert Jeff Speck.