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Fifteen states are not participating in a program to provide meals to school-age children over the summer, due to administrative costs or ideological opposition.
Investing in poor neighborhoods or dispersing the poor citywide each have their proponents. But place-based strategies — improving neighborhoods — may be our only feasible option.
More than 12,000 state residents who applied or attempted to recertify for the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, commonly known as food stamps, are still awaiting for their benefits to be processed months later.
Getting everybody housed requires multiple systems to work together, tapping the collective power of state, local and federal policymakers supported by the faith community, the business sector and philanthropy.
An audit from earlier this year found that, across 46 states, state agencies failed to report an estimated 34,000 cases of missing foster kids, including children who ran away multiple times.
Data-driven decisions, support from the state and a dedicated, collaborative team are helping Hennepin County get a handle on an intractable problem.
Proposed legislation would ensure, regardless of a person’s housing status, equal access to public services, including rights to personal property, emergency medical care and moving freely in public spaces.
Many of our land-use policies have their roots in housing discrimination, and they continue to stand in the way of affordable and equitable housing. These policies need to change. Restricting single-family zoning is a place to start.
The rate of teen births has dropped by 78 percent since a modern-day peak in 1991 of 61.8 births per 100,000 people. But since 2007, the rate had consistently dropped by about 8 percent and then in 2021, the rate declined just 2 percent.
Nationally, heat was the underlying or contributing cause of about 1,670 deaths last year, making it the highest heat-related death rate in at least two decades. Substance use, the housing crisis and an aging population contribute to the problem.
A new report identified thousands of properties nationwide as physically suitable buildings to be converted into apartments, including more than 50 in Dallas-Fort Worth. But the typical conversion is only financially feasible in six cities.
Demand for nonprofit services is on the rise, and legislators are paying more attention to ways they can support the sector.
Houston has created a real system to address homelessness, aligning city, county and nonprofit efforts. That innovative program is now under threat, due to changes in leadership and funding.
About 3.3 million state residents live in an area considered to be a food desert by USDA guidelines. Nationally, 17.4 percent of the population has limited access to affordable and nutritious food.
Federal pandemic aid that supported thousands of child-care providers will end soon, leading to downsizings and closures. There are innovative ways for states, local governments and businesses to mitigate the blow to working families and employers.
It offers significant cost, efficiency and sustainability benefits, but its widespread use is hampered by a patchwork of state and local regulations. Regulatory consistency could help builders deliver the housing we need.