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Food Security

But improving healthy and affordable food access goes beyond what’s in the name.
To reduce the violence Black urban farmers are growing fresh, affordable produce in the city’s food deserts. St. Louis has over 400 acres of vacant lots that could be converted into arable farmland.
Braddock, Pa., is where Andrew Carnegie first mass-produced steel. The city, now one-tenth its former size, is home to a new kind of industry: robotic farms that grow greens inside buildings.
The pandemic made it easier to get—and keep—food assistance. In some places, those expanded benefits are drawing to a close.
A new study has found that 68 percent of frontline organizations like food pantries and 80 percent of hunger advocacy organizations believe they should focus more effort on tackling the root causes of food insecurity, including poverty and structural racism within the food system.
With Americans increasingly unhealthy because of the highly processed foods they eat, there’s more talk about the need for quality over quantity of food.
Agrivoltaics — putting solar panels on farmland — lead to astonishing productivity gains and improved energy efficiency. Except when they don’t.
The City Council has authorized $977,000 to help local organizations combat the financial damages of the pandemic. Since April, the city has already approved $3.25 million for COVID response.
With dining-out options already few and far between because of COVID, the recent snowstorm has only made things worse for residents and visitors to the Big Apple.
Butler County Job and Family Services have expanded their online services to allow clients to access Medicaid, food and cash assistance remotely. Officials hope that the services are now more accessible.
Gov. Charlie Baker has announced that the funds in grants will be put toward addressing food insecurities caused by the coronavirus pandemic. Some funds will be invested in technology to help producers distribute food.
There is a high risk of undercounting in Texas due to privacy concerns of immigrants and hard-to-count locations. But several poverty-fighting programs rely heavily on funding determined by the census count.