Distracted-Driving Fines May Increase in Some States

Several states are taking steps to increase penalties for talking and texting while driving in the wake of a study that found current bans are not reducing the risk or amount of crashes.
by | June 26, 2012

Several states are taking steps to increase fines for talking on the phone and texting while driving in the wake of a study that found current distracted-driving laws aren't reducing the risk or amount of related crashes, according to USA Today.

In New Jersey, for example, a bill is moving through the state Senate that would increase fines for handheld cellphone use from $100 to $200. The California state Senate passed a bill in May that would increase the fines for texting or talking without a hands-free device by $10. And Connecticut really cracked down last year by increasing fines from $100 to $125 for the first offense, $150 to $250 for the second offense, and $200 to $400 for the third offense, according to the paper.

Seat belt studies have shown that more drivers obey the law when fines are increased, but some are skeptical that money can change behavior and believe that increased driver education is the answer, reports USA Today.

Leigh Ann Renzulli  |  Leigh Ann Renzulli

Join the Discussion

After you comment, click Post. You can enter an anonymous Display Name or connect to a social profile.

More from Lawmaking