Lawsuits Follow Signing of North Carolina Elections Bill

The new law brings sweeping changes to the state’s election process by reducing the early-voting period by a week, abolishing same-day voter registration and ending straight-party voting.
August 13, 2013

Gov. Pat McCrory on Monday signed into law a bill requiring voters to produce a photo ID when they go to the polls, and it was immediately met with legal challenges in federal court questioning its constitutionality.

 
The new law brings sweeping changes to the state’s election process by reducing the early-voting period by a week, abolishing same-day voter registration and ending straight-party voting.
 
“North Carolinians overwhelmingly support a common-sense law that requires voters to present photo identification in order to cast a ballot,” McCrory said in a statement. “I am proud to sign this legislation into law. Common practices like boarding an airplane and purchasing Sudafed require photo ID, and we should expect nothing less for the protection of our right to vote.”
 
North Carolina becomes one of 34 states with some form of voter ID law. The voter ID provision goes into effect for the 2016 election.
 
Now the fight moves from the political arena to the courts.

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