7 More States Request NCLB Waivers

Seven more states have applied for No Child Left Behind waivers.
by | September 10, 2012

Seven more states have applied for No Child Left Behind (NCLB) waivers, bringing the total number that have sought flexibility from the federal law to 44 plus the District of Columbia, the U.S. Department of Education announced Monday.

Alabama, Alaska, Hawaii, Maine, New Hampshire, North Dakota and West Virginia filed their applications before Sept. 6, the third deadline for states to seek waivers. Puerto Rico and the Bureau of Indian Education also asked for waivers during this round of applications.

The six states that have not requested waivers are Montana, Nebraska, Pennsylvania, Texas, Vermont and Wyoming. As Governing previously reported, these states have expressed concerns about enacting reforms set by the Obama administration that could dramatically change if and when a new administration is elected. The six states have also expressed opposition to the requirement that they agree to federal-approved reforms before getting a waiver.

To receive a waiver, states must commit to various reforms outlined by the White House, such as setting new student achievement goals and developing plans for intervening at struggling schools. In exchange, they're relieved from some of NCLB's more onerous requirements, particularly that 100 percent of students be proficient in math and reading by 2014.

Thirty-three states plus the District of Columbia's waivers have been approved.

The waiver program was initiated last fall by the Obama administration, as NCLB reauthorization bills failed to gain traction in Congress. The law has been due for reauthorization since 2007.

Governing is tracking the NCLB waiver process in the map below.

 
 
Application approved
 
Application approval pending
 
Intend to submit application
 
No application submitted

NOTE: Alaska has not submitted an application and Hawaii has submitted a waiver with approval pending. Information is current as of September 2012.

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