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Infrastructure Finance

Last year’s federal infrastructure bill allotted $62 billion to bolster and update the nation’s electric grid, which could result in $9.2 million annually to Louisiana for the next five years if the state’s application is approved.
Disadvantaged communities have suffered disproportionately from underinvestment in clean and affordable water. But a historic increase in federal water infrastructure funding can change the equation if managed correctly.
The money will be used to build upon the state’s existing base of electric vehicle chargers over the next two years. The Department of Energy listed nearly 1,300 public chargers across the state at 465 designated stations.
As heatwaves are becoming more intense and frequent, some states are looking to help cover some of the costs associated with air conditioning or require that landlords provide cooling systems. But not all landlords agree with the changes.
The most expensive item on the November ballot will be a general obligation bond measure that could end up being the largest revenue stream in the city’s history, increasing property taxes by $40.91 per every $100,000 in value.
The MBTA is facing a budget deficit that could swell once federal relief funds run out. The money has already been used to help stabilize the agency’s budget. Without the aid, the 2022 budget would have had a $132 million deficit.
Mayor Satya Rhodes-Conway’s budget would build bus rapid transit, support lower-cost housing and provide funds for the Madison Public Market. The budget includes no unexpected big-ticket items.
Roads and water infrastructure top the list of local priorities, but broadband expansion and clean energy projects are proving popular as cities face increased demand for these newer technologies.
If approved, residents would vote on their fourth bond program in less than two decades. The $1 billion program would help pay for better streets and city infrastructure, including $150 million for housing.
Removing highways is a tricky business, a costly and time-consuming physical feat, but advocates say even a small commitment to addressing the harms of legacy highway infrastructure is a positive sign.
State officials hope to get a large chunk of the more than $65 billion that is available to improve broadband access across the nation through the infrastructure bill that was approved last year.
The state’s plan to toll nine bridges across the state to help fund their replacement and maintenance has collapsed amid court rulings and negotiations between Gov. Tom Wolf and Republican lawmakers.
Unpaid gas and electric bills piled up during the coronavirus pandemic with nearly one in every six households and thousands of small businesses falling behind in payments. Now state officials are looking for a way to pay the money owed.
Elected and other officials gathered in Birmingham, Ala., to announce a new U.S. Department of Transportation pilot program aimed at addressing past infrastructure projects that have harmed and divided communities.
Starting next month, customers will notice extra charges on delivery orders, ride-sharing trips and car-share rentals, which are part of a change in transportation funding that will help pay for road and bridge projects.