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The Future of What’s Next

The “performance credit mechanism” would offer power producers financial rewards to have their plants available at times of highest demand and would take four years to implement. Lawmakers and energy experts are skeptical.
With announcements of more than two dozen manufacturing plants in the so-called “Battery Belt” of the U.S., the industry is growing at a breakneck pace.
They are increasingly turning to cutting-edge technologies to meet their daily operational needs. These initiatives serve as real-world tests and economic drivers in the communities the airports serve.
A coalition of railroad workers unions says the biggest rail companies in the U.S. have become far too focused on profits, and is calling for public ownership of rail infrastructure across North America.
Anticipating a future wave of EV ownership, the Pennsylvania PUC launched a streamlining process to potentially rewrite electric rates in the state to accelerate the adoption of electric vehicles.

A new generation of legislators is taking on contemporary issues of drug abuse, the lack of housing and inadequate health care.


Community solar allows customers to receive solar energy without having to install their own systems, allowing them to benefit from energy generated offsite, and could save residential customers about 10 percent in electricity costs.
A study found that 90 percent of companies listed in the S&P 100 index acknowledged that climate change is a risk to their industry, but only half of them disclosed lobbying practices that aligned with the Paris Agreement.
Electric vehicles make up an average of 6 percent of new vehicle registrations each month in Washington, double 2020’s monthly average. But a recent poll found that 48 percent of residents do not support a gas-car ban.
A decade after Hurricane Sandy, three of the city’s climate resiliency projects are nowhere near completion. The “Raised Shoreline” project has only spent 0.3 percent of its $103 million budget.
As COVID-19 transitions into being treated more like an endemic disease, health professionals are already preparing for how we can better respond to future pandemics.
Gov. Roy Cooper issued an executive order to establish the North Carolina Advanced Clean Trucks program, which will require medium and heavy-duty truck fleets to increase their rate of zero-emission vehicles starting by 2025.
New laws in Florida and Texas set the stage for states to have more control over what’s posted on social media, but that could soon be tested at the U.S. Supreme Court and mean potential changes to the First Amendment.
Research suggesting the 2020 California wildfires could have erased years of benefits from the state’s climate efforts has attracted international attention. Forest ecologists say it’s not that simple.
Generous federal funding will help school districts convert their fleets of aging, polluting diesel buses. But the complex financial question they face is whether to own or lease them from a third party.
The U.S. Department of Energy reports that there are 39 percent more electric vehicle chargers statewide this year than last, yet there is still only one charging station for every seven EV drivers.
The city and region are quickly running out of water as California’s drought persists, increasing the urgency for local officials to make immediate change instead of future investments.
Since the start of 2021, car manufacturers have announced plans to spend at least $50 billion on electric vehicle plants in 10 states and have received commitments of at least $10.8 billion to lure those developments within their borders.
For many residents who own an EV but do not have off-street parking, their charging solution of running a cord across a sidewalk is not really legal or safe. But without proper infrastructure, there aren’t many options.
Gov. Kathy Hochul announced last week that the state’s ClimateTech Growth Program would support companies that are commercializing technologies to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, including electric grids, industrial products and transportation.
Some argue the technology would help bring jobs and tax revenue to the state while removing greenhouse gas out of the air. But others fear the projects would disturb natural environments or become safety risks.
California’s shift away from gas-powered vehicles could mean as many as 80 percent of gas stations would be unprofitable by 2035. The state has some 250,000 station owners and employees.
A study by Carnegie Mellon University found that if at least 20 percent of cars are autonomous vehicles, traffic systems may start to see the operational improvements these vehicles are expected to bring.
The Colorado charging station bypasses the requirement for a three-phase power distribution system, which is not easily available in rural electric systems, by using existing infrastructure. Many hope this encourages electric vehicle adoption.
The state aims to have 1 out of every 5 vehicles on its roads electric by 2030, yet less than 1 percent of registered vehicles in the state are EVs and just 10 school buses and eight public transit buses are electric.
A new study from Nature Energy found that electric vehicle drivers should shift to charging their cars during the daytime, either at work or a public charging station, to reduce strain on the electric grid and infrastructure expansion needs.
As heatwaves are becoming more intense and frequent, some states are looking to help cover some of the costs associated with air conditioning or require that landlords provide cooling systems. But not all landlords agree with the changes.
Geothermal energy currently provides less than half of a percent of the nation’s power, but experts believe that it could produce as much as 5 percent of the electricity supply using existing technology.
The state’s ban on the sale of new gasoline-powered cars by 2035 aims to significantly reduce its largest source of carbon emissions and air pollution. Looking at the state’s past climate initiatives may help determine if this plan will work.
The toll road is looking to solar energy production to eventually electrify part of the road so electric vehicles can charge as they travel. The roadway would charge drivers for the electricity costs as they drove.
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