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The Future of What’s Next

As heatwaves are becoming more intense and frequent, some states are looking to help cover some of the costs associated with air conditioning or require that landlords provide cooling systems. But not all landlords agree with the changes.
Geothermal energy currently provides less than half of a percent of the nation’s power, but experts believe that it could produce as much as 5 percent of the electricity supply using existing technology.
The state’s ban on the sale of new gasoline-powered cars by 2035 aims to significantly reduce its largest source of carbon emissions and air pollution. Looking at the state’s past climate initiatives may help determine if this plan will work.
The toll road is looking to solar energy production to eventually electrify part of the road so electric vehicles can charge as they travel. The roadway would charge drivers for the electricity costs as they drove.
Pilot projects using bidirectional charging equipment are turning electric vehicles into battery storage units, feeding energy back onto the grid when needed. Fleet vehicles are seen as prime opportunity for the tech.
Residents have received warnings in recent days to conserve energy usage to prevent outages as a record-setting heat wave engulfs the state. EV charging only accounts for about 0.4 percent of the overall energy load.
In an effort to make it easier for library users to borrow digital versions of books, lawmakers and librarians are putting pressure on publishers to adjust the terms and costs of e-book licenses.
As historic floods beset several states, a new study finds that warming could make a California “megaflood” more dangerous, and likely, than previously thought.
The Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act, which was supported by several state Congress members, allots $8 billion for the expansion of hydrogen use in at least four regional hubs; some argue West Virginia should host one of them.
Gov. Janet Mills and other clean-car advocates argue that obstacles, like cost and availability, can prevent widespread adoption of zero-emission vehicles and the state’s transition must not leave out rural and low-income residents.
Diesel-powered school buses produce more than 5 million tons of carbon dioxide emissions. EV school buses eliminate harmful pollutants and cost less to maintain than diesel buses. But they aren’t cheap.
Connecticut gubernatorial candidate Bob Stefanowski criticized Gov. Ned Lamont over the lack of transparency and the increasing costs of the offshore wind redevelopment project in New London.
The tech company has partnered with the trucking company Daimler to increase its fleet of autonomous semitractor-trailers to 60 vehicles running on I-45 between Dallas and Houston.
A group of Republican attorneys general have filed a lawsuit in hopes of preventing California from setting its own vehicle emissions standards, claiming the state’s rules could negatively impact other states down the road.
The GO Green Energy Fund provides clean energy investments to low- to moderate-income neighborhoods to combat environmental injustice. Through the Inflation Reduction Act, green banks nationwide will receive $20 billion.
The rideshare company has partnered with Motional, an autonomous vehicle company, to develop autonomous EVs for rideshare purposes. For now, the new vehicle will be accompanied by two safety drivers.
Georgia has committed billions in incentives to electric vehicle and battery manufacturing companies for building factories across the state. The law is expected to stimulate investments that give consumers more choices.
After several years of pushing, the Phoenix Fire Department has officially launched its unmanned aircraft, or drone, systems program, laying the policy and best practices groundwork for other city departments to follow suit.
The federal Inflation Reduction Act includes a provision that would update the tax credit regulations for new electric vehicles to decrease or eliminate foreign-made parts in cars, which could possibly make EVs more expensive.
Voters face three major issues at this year’s midterms: abortion, the economy and state legislative control. Election Day is just three months away.
The Colorado River system, which supplies millions of Americans in the Western U.S. with water, has declined to just 39 percent filled in the last two decades. Many cities are already making adjustments to limit water usage.
Arizona, Colorado and Nevada are projected to grow by 30 percent or more by 2060, raising fears that demands for water will outstrip supply. Possible fixes include restricting water use and building new pipelines.
The state has partnered with Wisconsin, Indiana and Michigan to build a 1,000-mile electric vehicle charging circuit along a scenic Lake Michigan tourism route. The network is expected to be completed over the next few years.
The CHIPS and Science Act is awaiting signature from President Biden after it received approval from Congress last week. Many expect the legislation to be a huge boost to Michigan’s auto industry.
The offshore wind industry is expected to grow exponentially in the near future, pushed by federal and state mandates to increase offshore wind capacity. Many states also see the potential economic returns of the growing industry.
Eight all-electric school buses in the Cajon Valley Union School District will use advanced “vehicle-to-grid” technology to discharge emissions-free energy back to the grid after use.
The state will receive $57 million to build electric vehicles and six stretches of new road, which will increase the state’s National Electric Vehicle Infrastructure corridor by 44 percent.
State abortion bans clash with FDA approval of the pills, which have been deemed safe and effective since 2000 and were used by more than 3.7 million patients across the nation in 2018.
The enormous energy demands of Bitcoin mining are prompting some U.S. municipalities to impose moratoriums or outright bans on cryptocurrency facilities. Bitcoin mining activity, critics warn, is leading to electricity price hikes and a revival of dirtier sources of power.
Federal and state officials have enacted several laws within the past year to lower ozone levels along the state’s Front Range, but environmental experts say they aren’t sufficient to improve public health.
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