Economic Development

The average number of workers available for every open job is half what it has been for the past 20 years. The government sector faces the biggest shortage of all, with 5 times as many open jobs as workers to fill them.
The majority of California’s nine Bay Area counties plan to drop their COVID-19 restrictions when the state does the same next week. The area has had some of the strictest restrictions during the pandemic.
The Kansas City Area Transportation Authority is looking to incorporate public transit into the region’s development conversations, as a way to incentivize and influence growth in the area.
Western New York officials hope that federal funding from the Innovation and Competition Act, the proposed infrastructure package and from stimulus relief funds would be used to develop tech hubs and revitalize transportation networks.
Women left the workforce during the pandemic from layoffs or to care for their children at a much higher rate than men. Experts hope women will return to work as schools and other businesses reopen.
Cities and towns across the nation are reducing their hours or closing pools altogether because they cannot staff enough lifeguards. Reasons for the shortage vary but are related to fallout from the pandemic.
A report has found that the state’s strict coronavirus regulations have set the state up to have one of its best years of economic growth. It is estimated that the state’s GDP will grow 7.1 percent this year.
State Sen. Chuck Edwards has proposed a bill that would pay jobless residents for returning to the workforce, either $800 or $1,500 depending on how quickly they become employed.
The Great Depression crushed the economy. The New Deal saved it. Can an analogy be made with today’s economic situation? Professor Jason Scott Smith talks about what happened in the 1930s and what might happen today.
The research is clear: The creative and cultural sectors are a powerful force for helping communities large and small turn the corner on the pandemic’s economic shocks.