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Federal legislation requiring machine-readable reporting has its critics, but it would go a long way toward modernizing how data is collected, used and shared. It also could lower borrowing costs for states and localities.
Adversarial foreign nations might use data about specific politicians to blackmail them or troves of data about the public to refine disinformation campaigns, according to a Senate hearing. Getting that data could entail hacking or simply purchasing from data brokers.
State health officials have disclosed that the state’s first major count of pregnancy-related deaths in nearly a decade won’t be released until next summer, which means the data won’t be available to lawmakers until the 2025 cycle.
The Journalism Competition and Preservation Act has been delayed in the Senate Judiciary Committee after an amendment introduced by Sen. Ted Cruz to prohibit censorship “collusion” passed by an 11 to 10 vote.
From call records to sensors, your phone may reveal more about you than you think. Even a burner phone paid for with cash can reveal your identity and where you’ve been.
In the state and local gov tech industry, about one-sixth of funding opportunities are for cloud computing services. Overall, the use of cloud services in the past decade has risen across all industries.
Data collected from sewage water generates more accurate and economical information on COVID-19 activity than reports that depend on positive test results. But funding for this type of analysis hasn’t been reliable.
A bill that would have allowed prosecutors to sue social media companies for addicting their children to their online platforms died on Thursday, Aug. 11, just ahead of the Technology and Policy Summit.
It’s increasingly difficult to move about – both in the physical world and online – without being tracked. Often, companies or government agencies can even track personal data without a warrant.
Highly detailed data around cycling and pedestrian activity has not always been easy to come by. Public officials and micromobility advocates stress the need for better data to make the case for more and better infrastructure.
The pandemic brought the weaknesses of public health data systems into plain view. A new survey of public health officials finds that fixing this is a top priority. But high costs and politics remain a problem.
The U.S. National Bridge Inventory maps the location and other details of all bridges in the nation 100 years old or older. The interactive map offers data around the age of the bridge, its condition and daily traffic.
Frances Haugen, Timnit Gebru and Janneke Parrish are at the forefront of a group of high-profile women calling out big tech. Is there a connection between their gender and their role as whistleblowers?
The new position is part of the elections security and public information campaign run by the secretary of state. Republicans are calling it a partisan move. The specialist will earn an annual salary of $150,000.
One year after the Colonial Pipeline hack — and the IST Ransomware Task Force's report — attacks remain frequent. But government is making strides and recognizing the issue as a national security matter.
A group of nonprofits and corporations released a report this year, calling for self-regulation to protect patients’ data when it’s outside of the health-care system. But critics say it shouldn’t be trusted.