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Artificial Intelligence

A Livermore-based company hopes to implement fleets of driver-optional, electric tractors to farms and vineyards by the end of this year. But critics say the company has yet to prove its autonomous tractors are safe enough for use.
Four cities in the region have proposed using millions of pandemic relief funds for surveillance cameras to aid law enforcement and increase public safety. But there are concerns about the privacy risks.
AI can map fire perimeters in minutes, rather than hours, and can predict a wildfire’s speed and direction. But emphasis on preventative instead of reactive efforts would be more impactful, say fire experts.
Recommendations issued to the state Legislature include banning the technology from being used for live surveillance and that local police be prevented from using it unless explicitly allowed to do so by law.
As government call centers grapple with the nationwide staffing shortage and an influx in demand, some are implementing artificial intelligence tools to improve wait times and accessibility for callers.
Federal and state governments are turning to a facial recognition company to ensure that people accessing services are who they say they are. The move promises to cut down on fraud, but at what cost?
The trucking industry faces high turnover among drivers because its business model isn’t driver-centric. A tech company uses artificial intelligence to determine which routes are best for both the driver and revenue generation.
Facebook and its ilk bombard us with vitriolic content, and their algorithms help to divide Americans. Local-government leaders need to keep this in mind when they offer up incentives to attract their operations.
Artificial intelligence made few gains during the pandemic, Gartner finds, even as more agencies turn to chatbots. Confusion about the technology and anxiety among government workers are among the main hurdles.
If you see the Tesla Bot as a joke or a harbinger of a dystopian future, you could be missing the real threat, which has more to do with Elon Musk’s power than robots run amok.
Shifts in how we think about work in a post-COVID-19 world could create an opening for fairer hiring with the help of asynchronous interviews, using artificial intelligence to help reduce recruiting bias.
Before self-driving vehicles can be safely deployed in cities, the technology must learn all of the diversities of driving and pedestrian behavior, like the technically illegal “Pittsburgh left.”
The South Carolina police department has been using the facial recognition software, Clearview AI, for more than a year. Law enforcement officials said that the department has ultimately decided not to use the service.
A new bill would require AI developers to evaluate privacy risks, assess the potential for discriminatory decisions and the state’s Department of Technology would need to approve the software before its use in the public sector.
At least 42 law enforcement agencies across the state used the facial recognition software but many are discontinuing the service after zero percent of the software’s searches led to an arrest.