Report: Indiana Has Most to Gain if it Expanded Medicaid

Indiana would see one of the biggest reductions among states in its uninsured population if it expands Medicaid under a full implementation of the Affordable Care Act, according to a report released Wednesday.
August 1, 2013

Indiana would see one of the biggest reductions among states in its uninsured population if it expands Medicaid under a full implementation of the Affordable Care Act, according to a report released Wednesday.

 
The number of uninsured Hoosiers would drop 54.6 percent, the eighth-largest decrease among states, according to the report by the Urban Institute for the Kaiser Commission on Medicaid and the Uninsured. That would leave about 8 percent of the state's non-elderly population without health insurance, compared with 17 percent now.
 
Some of the reduction in the uninsured would come from other aspects of the 2010 law, commonly known as Obamacare. Those include premium subsidies for people who are not offered insurance through an employer and the requirement that most people buy insurance starting next year or pay a penalty.
 
Changes within the state range from a 48.9 percent decrease in the uninsured in the Indianapolis, Speedway and Beech Grove area, to a 63.5 percent decrease in the Huntington, Bluffton and Decatur area.
 
Indiana has so far decided not to expand eligibility for Medicaid, the joint federal and state health care program for the poor.

Join the Discussion

After you comment, click Post. You can enter an anonymous Display Name or connect to a social profile.

More from Health & Human Services