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The Future of Work

The state Senate passed the “Temp Worker Bill of Rights” after a monthslong saga that included a thrice-delayed final vote. The bill will give temp workers the right to basic information in their native language and eliminate agency fees.
The state’s layoffs decreased from 12,000 in 2020 to just 1,750 in 2022. But officials and economists are reluctant to hail the drop, saying the data needs to be contextualized to better understand Connecticut’s economic health.
Recent data reveals that four counties across North Texas have increased their numbers of workers with college degrees over the last five years and drawn more companies and workers from out of state.
A study evaluated 79 cities for their minimum wages and ranked them. When the cost of living is included, Philly’s minimum wage came out to just $6.69 per hour.
The factory jobs that used to be a fit for unskilled blue-collar workers are rapidly going high tech and white collar.
Calls to the state’s Employment Security Department were answered just 12.5 percent of the time in December and problems left over from the pandemic continue to backlog the benefits system, delaying relief for residents.
While they are disruptive for the lives of the affected workers, experts and economists argue that the layoffs don’t necessarily foreshadow economic collapse as the classic indicators of recession haven’t happened yet.
A new study has found that the arts, entertainment and recreation industry offers the least job security for the year. Jobs in the federal government were the most safe, with state and local education jobs ranked second in security.
Two studies found that white people account for about 54 percent of exempt city employees who make at least $90,000. African Americans are the only nonwhite group whose 2021 exempt employment rate fell below its 2016 rate.
Houston-area workplaces saw occupancy rates increase to nearly 60 percent in December 2022, up 25 percent from the beginning of the pandemic. The area’s return-to-office rate is outpacing several other major metro areas.
Some believe that companies fail to recognize a person’s commitment and desire to work that could make them a good candidate for an offered position, despite lacking credentials. But when do falsehoods become too much?
The state’s minimum wage increased by 80 cents to $10.10 an hour for non-tipped workers, the largest increase in more than a decade and a half. The state’s minimum wage increased about four times between 1969 and 2006.
The western region of New York is faced with an aging, shrinking and undiverse local workforce, and significant structural issues that make attracting and maintaining new workers a challenge. Revitalizing the workforce will be a large undertaking.
A handful of new state labor laws will go into effect on Jan. 1. With the new laws, employers will be required to include salary and wage ranges on job postings, minimum wage will rise and millions will receive greater paid family leave.
After taking a tour of the MBTA’s Repair Facility in Everett, Mass., Maura Healey reinforced the need for future investment, including in vocational schools and programs to create a talent pipeline.
The Los Angeles and Long Beach ports move a total of $469 billion worth of freight a year and employ 175,000 workers. But if the industry continues to favor East Coast ports, the impact on Southern California ports could be devastating.
Are community colleges prepared to train the workers a technology-based economy requires? Joseph Fuller of Harvard Business School talks about findings from a multiyear research project that finds they have far to go.
The WorkPlace Inc., and the Northwest Regional Workforce Investment Board have received funding from the EPA to launch environmental careers for students from underserved areas of the state known as brownfields.
A new report from experts at NYU and Harvard law schools outlines the ways state attorneys general can protect communities and workers as the country builds a clean energy economy.
Since 2000, 375 railroad workers have been killed on the job and more than 109,000 have been injured. But last year the National Transportation Safety Board investigated just 14 train incidents.
Workers at John Deere, Starbucks, University of California and Cedar Rapids’ Ingredion are all a part of the wave of organized labor strikes that occurred this year. An economics professor explains the impacts of these movements.
Many “guest workers” on temporary work visas must get rehired within 60 days to avoid being forced to leave the U.S. It’s unclear how many of the 18,000 Seattle-area tech workers laid off had temporary visas.
The state’s Workforce Development Council has recommended the Legislature invest more funding in operations and programming of new career and tech centers and education as well as support staff training.
This week, New Mexico Gov. Michelle Lujan Grisham’s administration announced that it would rescind its telework policy that was established during the pandemic. Union leaders and members have expressed frustrations over the decision.
Two million Californians lost unemployment benefits last September when pandemic-era programs ended a lifeline for many workers, specifically those who were less-educated, Black or over the age of 64.
Gov. J.B. Pritzker announced a bipartisan agreement to fill the financial hole in the state’s unemployment insurance trust fund, which once stood at $4.5 billion, that was depleted by the pandemic.
In September, the state had nearly 1.03 million job openings, which amounts to almost 1.8 openings for every unemployed resident. Dallas-Fort Worth added 255,000 jobs in the last year, roughly 2.5 times the usual pace.
The region has added 19,500 jobs in October and 255,000 jobs in the 12 months ending in October, far outpacing previous years’ job growth. D-FW also set a new high for total employment in October with nearly 4.19 million workers.
With more people questioning the facts used in public finance, the Government Finance Officers Association has developed a curriculum that provides education and communication skills to remedy divisive and uncivil discourse.
The Washington state Employment Security Department estimates that the state is set to lose as many as 18,000 tech or tech-related jobs over barely two months. But some are hopeful the layoffs will be short-lived.
Comptroller Thomas DiNapoli’s office reported that the state’s antiquated unemployment system and “ad hoc workarounds” contributed to a loss of billions of dollars in improper payments.
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