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Workforce Development

Cities and counties are still struggling to regain pre-pandemic employment levels. New approaches to hiring and retention could help fill the gap.
Gov. Charlie Baker has filed a $3.5 billion funding package that includes nearly $970 million for revitalizing downtowns, $1.2 billion on developing climate resiliency and $325 million on workforce initiatives.
The estimated cost of attendance at a University of California is $38,504; California State Universities are expected to cost $30,676. Only 33 percent of Californians said a four-year degree was needed for a successful and profitable career.
The Texas city’s manufacturing jobs reached 52,000 last fall, its highest level in more than two decades; employment in auto manufacturing more than doubled over the last 20 years.
State and local officials have promised the electric vehicle maker free land, a state-owned training center, a new interchange along I-20 and tax breaks in exchange for a local factory that would create 7,500 jobs.
Sponsored
In order to keep technology projects on time and on track, it’s important to identify and secure the right executive sponsor.
Despite declining COVID numbers, the state’s unemployment numbers remain well above the national average. Businesses are still cautious about hiring and thousands of workers are quitting their jobs.
To combat the continuing labor shortage, many companies are reconsidering hiring requirements and are “downcredentialing” their job openings. Many expect this reclassification to continue beyond the pandemic.
Three Wall Street firms will commit $3 million each for the next 10 years for the “Investing in Black Futures” initiative, which will recruit, train and mentor students from four historically Black colleges and universities for finance careers.
The Minnesota city has received more than $1 million from the state to help prepare individuals for new careers, particularly in the health care, construction, IT and manufacturing fields.
A new report found that just more than one-third of the California county’s 190,000 total jobs were “quality jobs.” But a public-private initiative wants to upgrade the region’s employment by about 20 percent.
Advocates are pushing for “clean slate” legislation, which would expunge criminal records for people with low-level or non-violent crimes. But until reform happens, these groups are helping to secure second chances.
The state announced it would use federal pandemic funds to give one-time bonuses to health-care workers but it omitted the largest group of health attendants, who provide services to about 130,000 low-income Texans.
Interviews and surveys with hundreds of teachers and school administrators reveal the effect of persistent staffing shortages on school personnel – and on students.
Started by Jerry Brown nearly 50 years ago, the CCC is a rock-solid model for programs that combine workforce development, public service and pushback against climate change.