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Workforce Development

The program offers companies tax breaks based on the number of employees they hire and where those jobs are located. A report found the program costs more to operate than the tax revenue it generates.
Recent data reveals that four counties across North Texas have increased their numbers of workers with college degrees over the last five years and drawn more companies and workers from out of state.
The factory jobs that used to be a fit for unskilled blue-collar workers are rapidly going high tech and white collar.
While they are disruptive for the lives of the affected workers, experts and economists argue that the layoffs don’t necessarily foreshadow economic collapse as the classic indicators of recession haven’t happened yet.
Idaho employs an average of 53,000 farmers annually, but the state only has 274 homes subsidized by the federal government for farmworkers. The state is looking for ways to build more farmworker housing.
A new study has found that the arts, entertainment and recreation industry offers the least job security for the year. Jobs in the federal government were the most safe, with state and local education jobs ranked second in security.
Two studies found that white people account for about 54 percent of exempt city employees who make at least $90,000. African Americans are the only nonwhite group whose 2021 exempt employment rate fell below its 2016 rate.
Houston-area workplaces saw occupancy rates increase to nearly 60 percent in December 2022, up 25 percent from the beginning of the pandemic. The area’s return-to-office rate is outpacing several other major metro areas.
Some believe that companies fail to recognize a person’s commitment and desire to work that could make them a good candidate for an offered position, despite lacking credentials. But when do falsehoods become too much?
The state’s minimum wage increased by 80 cents to $10.10 an hour for non-tipped workers, the largest increase in more than a decade and a half. The state’s minimum wage increased about four times between 1969 and 2006.
The western region of New York is faced with an aging, shrinking and undiverse local workforce, and significant structural issues that make attracting and maintaining new workers a challenge. Revitalizing the workforce will be a large undertaking.
A handful of new state labor laws will go into effect on Jan. 1. With the new laws, employers will be required to include salary and wage ranges on job postings, minimum wage will rise and millions will receive greater paid family leave.
Lawmakers passed nearly 120 bills this past legislative session and some of the highest-profile bills have already gone into effect. But 20 new laws, from workers’ compensation to victim restitution, start on Jan. 1.
After taking a tour of the MBTA’s Repair Facility in Everett, Mass., Maura Healey reinforced the need for future investment, including in vocational schools and programs to create a talent pipeline.
Are community colleges prepared to train the workers a technology-based economy requires? Joseph Fuller of Harvard Business School talks about findings from a multiyear research project that finds they have far to go.
A new report from experts at NYU and Harvard law schools outlines the ways state attorneys general can protect communities and workers as the country builds a clean energy economy.