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alan-greenblatt

Alan Greenblatt

Senior Staff Writer

Alan Greenblatt -- Senior Staff Writer. Alan covers politics as well as policy issues for Governing. He is the coauthor of a standard textbook on state and local governments. He previously worked as a reporter for NPR and CQ and has written about politics and culture for many other outlets, print and online. He can be found on Twitter at @AlanGreenblatt.

Ken Paxton shows how it's done. Meanwhile, five Michigan candidates for governor are disqualified for submitting forged signatures and a reminder why it's so hard to beat incumbents.
The president's party always loses seats in midterms. This year, just about everything — fundraising, voter enthusiasm, demographic shifts, the issues mix — is going the right way for Republicans.
Some states have responded with restrictions, but many more have loosened requirements. Dan Malloy, governor of Connecticut during Sandy Hook, reflects on how he was able to get a gun-safety law passed.
Wisconsin’s largest city suffers from a soaring murder rate and serious budget problems. Cavalier Johnson, the first new mayor in nearly 20 years, can’t wait to turn the city around.
While the GOP struggles for its soul and debates MAGA versus RINO, Democrats are in disarray. Also, lawmakers who simply do not copy and paste legislation from other states are more likely to find success.
As the nation approaches a grim milestone, public and political will to do much about the disease has faded. But absent health measures, the devastation could have been far worse.
The Supreme Court's expected decision to overturn Roe is both the payoff from a decadeslong push by conservative activists and a signal for action on further fronts of the culture war.
Plus a look at missed opportunities for Democrats; a redistricting roundup; and, courage under pressure.
Rising costs are starting to put pressure on budgets and may increase pension risk. Still, government balance sheets are in good shape and the economy remains in growth mode.
A number of states are seeing dozens of lawmakers retire all at once. Reasons differ, but there’s wide agreement partisanship has poisoned the atmosphere.