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Thom Reilly is the chancellor of the Nevada System of Higher Education. He is a former director of the Morrison Institute for Public Policy at Arizona State University and a professor in ASU's School of Public Affairs.

Reilly is a former county manager for Clark County, Nev., and has held senior administrative positions in Nevada state government, overseeing income-maintenance programs and the statewide child-welfare system. He was managing principal and founder of the Reilly Group, a Las Vegas-based management-consulting firm, and is former vice president of social responsibility at Caesars Entertainment Inc.

Reilly has authored numerous published works on public pay and benefits as well as on governance and child welfare. His most recent book, published in 2016, is The Failure of Governance in Bell, California: Big-Time Corruption in a Small Town. His book Rethinking Public Sector Compensation: What Ever Happened To The Public Interest? was published in 2012. His edited volumes, The Governance of Local Communities: Global Perspectives and Challenges and Pensions: Policies, New Reforms and Current Challenges were released in 2017 and 2014. respectively.

A fellow of the National Academy of Public Administration, Reilly received his master's and doctorate in public administration from the University of Southern California. He also earned a master's degree in social work at ASU.

November 20, 2017

The Murky World of ‘Official Time’ in Government

Allowing municipal employees to conduct union business while on the clock is widespread. It could use a dose of transparency.
October 1, 2015

Government’s Continuing Budget-Buster: Paid Sick Leave

Few cities and counties have taken the steps they should to get these costs under control.
June 29, 2015

A Better Way to Set Public Pay

Too few local governments are taking advantage of a valuable tool: benchmarking compensation among their public- and private-sector peers.
September 29, 2014

Why We Need to Re-Think Public Employees’ Compensation

Traditional public pensions widen the public-private pay gap, and they aren't a good fit for a younger government workforce.