Internet Explorer 11 is not supported

For optimal browsing, we recommend Chrome, Firefox or Safari browsers.

Courts

More than a dozen current and former Torrance, Calif., police officers and recruits exchanged racist text messages for years. The discovery could undermine hundreds of cases in which those officers either testified or made arrests.
Author and federal judge Jeffrey Sutton argues the legislative branch of states should take a larger role in constitutional experimentation, and we should ask less of the judicial branch.
Some of the changes have made it easier to participate in courtroom processes, like online jury selection and trials. But not everything translates easily online, and not everyone has Internet access.
The Department of Workforce Development has adjusted training and workload, but high demand has led to turnover among judges, significantly delaying the unemployment claims process.
Ethics rules require judges to recuse themselves from cases involving relatives or their own partisan or political interests. But it doesn't always work out that way.
The state Supreme Court will determine if police should be allowed to track people via their cellphone location without a court-issued warrant. The court will deliver a decision in the coming months.
At issue is the right to carry handguns in public, not just keep them at home. The Supreme Court will hear oral arguments on Nov. 3.
Republican attorneys general have already filed more than a dozen joint lawsuits against the Biden administration. All presidents should expect to be challenged by AGs from the other party.
Current and former employees have accused the state trial court system of discriminatory practices due to their race. Some workers alleged they were passed over for promotions for white colleagues who were less qualified.
New state laws empower citizens to take the law into their own hands when it comes to abortion and elections. They're only the latest manifestation of rage against government itself.
As state courts prepare to weigh in on accusations of gerrymandering, lawmakers across the country are hard at work trying to change those courts’ ideological balance.
A federal judge has proposed that the city of Portland, Ore., and the U.S. Department of Justice use a court-appointed monitor to oversee their nine-year-old settlement on police reform.
The state’s Supreme Court has unanimously ruled that the new law banning citizen-led ballot initiatives infringed on the public’s right to enact laws outside of the state Legislature. The new law is now void.
Lawyers and judges have been mostly quiet during the current struggles over race, politics and diversity. Now, the legal profession is speaking out on how to bring the nation together.
The laws in Texas are vague when it comes to legally changing a name and gender marker. Cases are often up to the discretion of the judge and can take months to go through the process.