Infrastructure & Environment

Port Authority Commissioner Resigns

April 15, 2014
 

Port Authority Commissioner Anthony Sartor submitted his letter of resignation today, saying he was leaving the agency after 15 years to spend more time with his family.

The Sunday Star-Ledger, citing sources, reported Sartor, one of five remaining New Jersey commissioners on the 12-seat board, would step down. Today, a spokesman for Sartor released his resignation letter, which was dated April 14 and addressed to Port Authority Board Secretary Karen Eastman.

"Were it not for my respect and appreciation for the leadership of Governor Christie, this letter would have been written months ago," wrote Sartor, whose wife, Maria, passed away last year. "A short time ago, I attended a family celebration of my grandson's 13th birthday. As those who know me area aware, time with family is cherished. More than a celebration of his special day, that event wsa a tipping point in motivating me to retire from public service now."

Sartor was appointed to the Port Authority board in 1999 by Republican Gov. Christine Todd Whitman and reappointed by Gov. Donald DeFrancesco, a Republican, and then Gov. Jon Corzine, a Democrat. His current term expired June 30, but he was asked to stay on by Gov. Chris Christie.

Prior to being named to the Port Authority, Sartor served for several years on the New Jersey Sports and Exposition Authority board.

A consultant with a Ph.D. in engineering, Sartor served as chairman of the Port Authority board's World Trade Center Redevelopment Subcommittee, In November, he received the 2013 President’s Medal for Lifetime Achievement from the New Jersey Institute of Technology in November.

Sartor is the second New Jersey member of the 12-seat bi-state board to step down since the agency was rocked by revelations that September's traffic-snarling lane closures at the George Washington Bridge appeared to be politically motivated.

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