AUTHORS

Elizabeth Kellar is president and CEO of the Center for State and Local Government Excellence, a nonprofit organization that helps local and state governments become employers of choice so they can attract and retain talented public servants. She also serves as deputy executive director for the International City/County Management Association (ICMA).

Kellar leads ICMA's public policy team and speaks on ethics at state, national and international meetings. She has served as ICMA's ethics adviser, launched a monthly ethics column and developed ethics training programs. She served two terms on the Montgomery County, Md., Ethics Commission and was chair of the commission for three years.

Kellar is a Fellow in the National Academy of Public Administration and has served as chair for NAPA's Standing Panel on the Federal System. She serves on the American University School of Public Affairs Advisory Council and the editorial board of Public Administration Review. Her publications include "Managing with Less," "Ethical Insight, Ethical Action" and "Ethos."

Prior to joining ICMA, she was responsible for community relations for the city of Sunnyvale, Calif. She has a master's degree in journalism and political science from Ohio State University.

November 5, 2014

The Hard Work of Restoring Trust in Government

Countering the public's cynicism and mistrust starts with honest, open communication.
July 8, 2014

The Challenge of Building the Workforce Government Needs

Competition from the private sector is stiff. Governments have much to offer, but they need do a better job of getting the message out.
April 9, 2014

Public Pensions and the Lessons of Success

Some state and local retirement systems have found a formula for stability.
January 16, 2014

Public Health and the Leadership Imperative

Government leaders long ago took up the challenge of protecting the public from deadly diseases. New challenges are testing that resolve.
August 29, 2013

Why Municipal Bankruptcy is Rare (and Should Be)

It's expensive, time-consuming and seldom produces the hoped-for results. Municipalities instead should heed the lessons of those that have dealt with tough fiscal times effectively.