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California Governor's Solid Approval Rating May Not Translate into Votes

More than half of those surveyed in a new USC Dornsife/Los Angeles Times poll say they approve of the job Jerry Brown is doing as governor — the highest rating since he retook the governor's office in 2011. Yet only 32% say they are inclined to vote for Brown if he seeks an unprecedented fourth term as California's chief executive next year.

Jerry Brown may be the state's longest-serving governor, with a political resume that spans six decades, but California voters are ambivalent about the 75-year-old Democrat.

More than half of those surveyed in a new USC Dornsife/Los Angeles Times poll say they approve of the job Brown is doing as governor — the highest rating since he retook the governor's office in 2011. Yet only 32% say they are inclined to vote for Brown if he seeks an unprecedented fourth term as California's chief executive next year.

Moreover, respondents give Brown little credit for what is widely considered as his signature achievement since returning to the governor's office in 2011 — erasing a $26 billion state deficit. Only 38% say they approve of the way Brown has handled the issue; 47% disapprove.

Half of respondents say California's economy is not getting better. They don't blame Brown — but voters who do see improvement give a better-functioning Legislature more credit for the turnaround than they give the governor.

Some of Brown's lower ratings may be due to his subdued governing style.

"Brown has made less effort to establish a public and media presence in California than any governor in almost a quarter century," said Dan Schnur, director of USC's Jesse M. Unruh Institute of Politics. "Because Brown has maintained such a relatively low profile, voters don't have strong feelings about him."

Still, Brown is in good position for next year's election because of Democratic dominance of state politics, the pollsters say. But the survey exposes some potential vulnerabilities for the governor.

Caroline Cournoyer is GOVERNING's senior web editor.
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