Tina Trenkner

Tina Trenkner

Deputy Editor, GOVERNING.com

Tina Trenkner (@TinaTrenkner) is GOVERNING.com deputy web editor. She started at GOVERNING in 2009 and has covered stories such as the rise of the coder in local government and the risks of using social media. Previously, she worked for Education Week and Pre-K Now, a completed project from the Pew Center on the States. She is a graduate of Northwestern University and thinks of Evanston often.

 

A Stateline analysis found that students who participate in state 'School Choice' programs actually have very limited choices.
There's a new political alignment in Kansas, a new and stronger strain of conservatism that has moved the right more to the right, leaving some conservative politicians looking more like the new center, experts say.
States have wildly different policies when it comes to voting rights for convicted felons. Some say those discrepancies may impact the outcome of elections.
Members of the International Union of Railways came to Capitol Hill to discuss the progress of high-speed rail worldwide.
SB 1476, a bill working its way through the California Legislature, would remove the limit of two legal parents per child. Similar legislation exists in Delaware, Pennsylvania, Maine, and the District of Columbia.
Although mail-in votes raise concerns for voter fraud, Texas absentee ballots are expected to play a major hand in the 33rd Congressional District race on July 31.
Illinois Gov. Pat Quinn signed a bill Thursday removing a loophole that allowed immediate family members to help fugitives escape the country without legal penalty. Illinois was one of 14 states to have such an exemption.
President Obama and challenger Mitt Romney have fallen short thus far when it comes to targeting Latino voters electronically, according to some Spanish-language media experts.
A higher office could become available this summer when Mitt Romney, the Republican presidential nominee, picks a running mate. Marco Rubio ranks high on most vice-president short-lists
The state of Michigan and its largest city have pledged cooperation to keep the city afloat. But neither quite trusts the other.