TABLE of CONTENTS May 2005

Cover Story

Taxophobe Targets

BY Zach Patton

Breaking a promise not to raise taxes is a dicey thing to do. But lawmakers get away with it.

Features

Refugee Renewal

Absorbing the displaced from overseas can be a tough urban task. But for a city in decline, it can be an unexpected opportunity. BY William Fulton

Law of the Land

Voters' challenge to Oregon's stringent land use controls may signal a major shift in the property rights debate nationwide. BY Jonathan Walters

High-Tech Hide-And-Seek

A new sport called "geocaching" presents a challenge for park managers. BY Christopher Swope

Sticking it to the Cities

Revenue losses add up in localities where hockey teams are supposed to play. BY Christopher Swope

The Erpworks

Recoding the guts of an enterprise can bring a city or state to the brink of failure, fatigue and notoriety. BY Ellen Perlman

The Fast Lane

As gridlock gets worse and technology improves, the use of toll lanes and other market-based tools to regulate rush-hour driving is gaining acceptance. BY Christopher Swope

Up Front

Potomac Chronicle

Tired of Tin-Cup Politics

A new group of urban leaders wants a strategy based on success, not on pleading for help. BY Sarah Harney
Politics

Tabor Repairman

What's more surprising than Andrew Romanoff becoming Colorado's House speaker? His revenue-reform success. BY Sarah Harney
Politics

Growing Wild

The D.C. area's boomingest county is about to start booming even more. BY Sarah Harney
Politics

Diamond in the Rough

How a 600-page book became a must-read in rural Montana. BY Sarah Harney
Politics

Nothing Scandalous

Wisconsin politics used to be squeaky clean. Now "jaded" would be a better word. BY Sarah Harney
Politics

Nothing Scandalous

Wisconsin politics used to be squeaky clean. Now "jaded" would be a better word. BY Sarah Harney
Finance

Found Money

State finances are looking better, but it's due more to luck than design. BY Sarah Harney
Urban Notebook

Don't Forget Philanthropists

Corporate leadership of cities is at an all-time low. Business consolidations swallowed many of the local banks and newspapers that once called the shots in cities, and globalization has broadened the horizons of surviving companies. But as CEOs step back, others are stepping forward, including philanthropists. BY Sarah Harney
Smart Management

Sacredness in the City

There are three basic elements to a superior urban experience, declares Author Joel Kotkin: economic power, personal security and sacredness. BY Sarah Harney

The Business of Government

Infrastructure & Environment

Minnesota Stops Whining

A new way to texturize roadways tempers highway noise. BY Sarah Harney
Infrastructure & Environment

Cheering Squad: Seattle Settles a Line-Cutting Score

In most places, traffic cops don't get no respect for hanging around to nab drivers for their sins. In Seattle, however, two motorcycle cops are revered for patrolling a freeway ramp to stop drivers who cut in line. BY Sarah Harney
Tech Talk

The Frequency Factor

When children in school and books in libraries can be tracked by radio waves, privacy advocates get all upset. BY Sarah Harney
Technology

Wisconsin Fights the Feds

The state is defying a moratorium on Internet access taxes. BY Sarah Harney
Technology

Finger Pointing

A New Technology Targets Gun Sales BY Sarah Harney
Smart Management

Cashing Out

Our household is just like a state: good at forecasting revenue, but when it comes to expenditures, things get dicier. BY Sarah Harney
Smart Management

Cashing Out

Our household is just like a state: good at forecasting revenue, but when it comes to expenditures, things get dicier. BY Sarah Harney
Health & Human Services

Nexium's Start Turn

As TV ads hype the demand for costly brand-name drugs, those who pay Medicaid's pill bill are fighting back. BY Sarah Harney
Public Money

The Oldest State

Gone are the comforts of an era when an ever-expanding economy coupled with growing populations could pay the future freight. BY Sarah Harney
Energy & Environment

Farm-Fed Fuels on the Rise

Ethanol plants grow in the Midwest BY Sarah Harney
Energy & Environment

It's in the Bag: Acting on an Eyesore

There may not be an American equivalent for "witches' knickers"--the British phrase that describes plastic grocery bags caught in tree branches--but the flimsy, disposable bags are a growing problem here, and some states and localities are starting to take action. BY Sarah Harney
Economic Development

Setting Limits on Big Boxes

Small towns try to zone out big stores. BY Sarah Harney