TABLE of CONTENTS March 2003

Cover Story

Guide To Wireless Security: Wi-Fi Anxiety

BY Christopher Swope

Lock up your laptops. Secure your airwaves. In the wide-open world of wireless, it isn't easy to keep out intruders.

Features

Catch-22 For College Savings

"Tomorrow's tuition at today's prices." that's the slogan many states use to sell pre-paid tuition plans to parents and grandparents. The plans aim to make college affordable for the next generation of students while promoting in-state public schools. BY Christopher Swope

Squeezing The Federal Turnip

This isn't the easiest time for localities to get money out of Washington. But they aren't about to quit asking. BY Alan Greenblatt

Gaming The Budget

In the midst of a fiscal crisis, many states are betting on the legalization or expansion of gambling to boost their revenues. BY Ellen Perlman

Do You Believe In Ferries?

Commuting by water was all but dead a decade ago. Highway gridlock has brought it back to life. BY Anya Sostek

Dry Spell

Places can't stop drought from coming their way, but they can control its devastating effects. BY Christopher Conte

Up Front

A Medicaid Seduction

Washington is trying to sweet-talk the states into a health care deal. The states should turn it down. BY Sarah Harney
Finance

Pray For Peace

Combative and unpredictable, Steve Peace isn't your typical state budget director. But a $35 billion shortfall isn't your typical state budget problem. BY Sarah Harney
Urban Notebook

Birds of A Feather

One of the handiest concepts for understanding how cities develop is the notion of "clustering," developed by Harvard business professor Michael Porter. Simple concept: It holds that, in some highly developed industries, leading practitioners need to be near one another, even when logic and high land costs might suggest that it's better to disperse. BY Sarah Harney
Management & Labor

The Consolidated Divide

Mike Huckabee, the governor of Arkansas, is as amiable a fellow as most governors, and normally spends a good deal of his time traveling around the state and mixing with his constituents. BY Sarah Harney

The Business of Government

Tech Talk

Don't Bug Me

Protecting network systems against virus attacks takes good management--and a little bit of luck. BY Sarah Harney
Tech Talk

Don't Bug Me

Protecting network systems against virus attacks takes good management--and a little bit of luck. BY Sarah Harney
Technology

A New Light On Energy Audits

When California was in the throes of its energy crisis two years ago, state agencies did everything possible to conserve energy immediately. Employees unplugged coffee pots and refrigerators and even worked in the dark with flashlights. BY Sarah Harney
Smart Management

Coming To Terms

Fuzzy language is a big impediment to good management--and to understanding the way government really works. BY Sarah Harney
Health & Human Services

The Universal Cause

Several health insurance companies have stepped up to say they intend to promote universal health care coverage. BY Sarah Harney
Infrastructure & Environment

Money Trail

Public interest in the Lewis and Clark bicentennial should benefit tourism in many states. BY Sarah Harney
Infrastructure & Environment

Money Trail

Public interest in the Lewis and Clark bicentennial should benefit tourism in many states. BY Sarah Harney
Politics

Off The Wall

Camden, New Jersey, has a new kind of homeless problem involving the city's namesake, an 18th-century English earl who never set foot on American soil. BY Sarah Harney
Politics

Casting Aspersions By Ballot

Tim Eyman has launched a number of successful anti-tax ballot initiatives in Washington State in recent years. Does that make Eyman a "horse's ass"? BY Sarah Harney
Finance

The Deficit Diet

Meals are generally considered to be a highlight of life behind bars. So states take a risk when they mess with inmates' mess. In the wake of budget cuts, however, Iowa has been pruning prison meals to save money on food. BY Sarah Harney
Public Money

Death And Taxes

The demise of the federal estate tax will take with it billions in state revenue--unless states distance themselves from the feds. BY Sarah Harney
Infrastructure & Environment

A Powerful California Commision Survives A Demise

California's Coastal Commission was down--but now it is not necessarily out. Despite state and federal court rulings that deemed the agency unconstitutional, the California legislature is reviving it. BY Sarah Harney
Infrastructure & Environment

A Powerful California Commision Survives A Demise

California's Coastal Commission was down--but now it is not necessarily out. Despite state and federal court rulings that deemed the agency unconstitutional, the California legislature is reviving it. BY Sarah Harney
Infrastructure & Environment

Roswell's Image Takes Flight

What, exactly, does a pilot's ability to right a plane after the tail fin snaps off have to do with the prosperity of Roswell, New Mexico? Plenty. The small city has landed a flight safety training center that will boost its image as an aviation hub and help attract more aviation-related businesses to the area. BY Sarah Harney