TABLE of CONTENTS August 2005

Cover Story

Superfund Setbacks

BY Ellen Perlman

Damaged sites don't fade away. They just give local officials a planning headache.

Features

Plague of Errors

Hospital infection rates are rising and killing 90,000 patients a year. Can the states put a stop to it? BY John Buntin

Double Booking

A city and a university sharing a library? It's not easy, but San Jose is doing it. BY Anne Jordan

Stolen Identities

States are leaping on the identity theft issue, hoping to reassure consumers. The data industry wants them to take it easy. BY Zach Patton

How Dense Can You Get?

Staten Island is the epicenter of the national debate over balancing the need for affordable housing with the desire to control development. BY Rob Gurwitt

Land Law

A Supreme Court win for a Connecticut city could end up curbing some uses of eminent domain. BY Alan Greenblatt

Up Front

Potomac Chronicle

Vintage Conservatism

The U.S. Supreme Court is about to turn right. Will that help states? Not necessarily. BY Donald F. Kettl
Infrastructure & Environment

Motor Trouble

Joel Silverman was asked to reform his state's vehicle license management. Not everyone wanted it reformed. BY Rob Gurwitt
Politics

Reward for Release

States are opening ballot boxes to ex-felons. BY Alan Greenblatt
Politics

Tarnished Coin

Can all the ethical problems of the Ohio GOP be laid at the governor's feet? Some Republicans hope so. BY Alan Greenblatt
Politics

A Billion Bucks a Mile

Why Seattle is rethinking mass transit BY Alan Greenblatt
Public Safety & Justice

Inner-Ring Recovery

Some close-in suburbs have found renewal strategies that work. BY Alan Greenblatt
Politics

Getting Smarter

The smart-growth movement isn't making much noise these days, but it's learning how to win. BY Alan Greenblatt
Urban Notebook

Paying to Parade

Last time you saw a parade, probably there were politicians perched on the back seats of convertibles or marching along, with supporters holding signs identifying them by name and office. If the parade was in Boston, then you can be sure that the grinning politicians paid for their places in the procession. It's a tradition, the Boston Globe reported recently. BY Otis White
Smart Management

Last Call for Taverns

Chicago's mayor is encouraging citizens to exercise control over seedy bars in their neighborhoods. BY Alan Ehrenhalt

The Business of Government

Economic Engines

The Mega-City Maker

Interstates created mega regions, and mega regions will change how we see this country and its transportation needs. BY Alex Marshall
Tech Talk

Block that Broadband

Any city that tries to build its own high-speed Internet connections can expect a whole lot of pushback. BY Ellen Perlman
Management & Labor

Grading the Graders: Delaware has a New Take on Rating Teachers

When some Delaware students return to the classroom in September, they won't be the only ones anxiously awaiting test scores. A new trial evaluation method will be used to measure teacher performance. BY Ben Delman
Management & Labor

Grading the Graders: Delaware has a New Take on Rating Teachers

When some Delaware students return to the classroom in September, they won't be the only ones anxiously awaiting test scores. A new trial evaluation method will be used to measure teacher performance. BY Ben Delman
Management & Labor

Grading the Graders: Delaware has a New Take on Rating Teachers

When some Delaware students return to the classroom in September, they won't be the only ones anxiously awaiting test scores. A new trial evaluation method will be used to measure teacher performance. BY Ben Delman
Health & Human Services

From the Top: Michael Leavitt Speaks Up and Out

A few weeks ago, Governing sat down with Michael Leavitt, the U.S. Health and Human Services secretary and former governor of Utah, to talk about changes that could be in store for the Medicaid program. Here are some key points he made. BY Penelope Lemov
Health & Human Services

Phantom of the Neighborhood

Population explosions usually mean lots of new residents. But that's not always the case. BY Ellen Perlman
Finance

California's Etax Victory

A California court of appeals has ruled that Borders.com is responsible for the collection of use taxes on purchases made by California residents at its Web site. BY Ben Delman
Finance

Ready for Prime Time: Internet Sales Taxes are a Giant Step Closer

Internet sales taxes go live on October 1. That's when online retailers will be asked to start collecting the tax--at least for the 18 states that have recently passed laws simplifying and harmonizing their sales tax systems. The big question for this meticulously designed scheme, which is strictly voluntary for the retailers, is how many of them will actually sign up. BY Christopher Swope
Energy & Environment

Gone Fishing

EPAs aren't keeping up with other agencies in using high-tech tools to detect dangers and deter misconduct. BY Tom Arrandale
Economic Engines

Blindsided & Bummed About It

Here's a simple definition of business-friendly: Tell me what the rules are up front and then apply them fairly. BY William Fulton
Technology

Beyond Efficiency

IT Takes On Health and Safety BY William Fulton