Dan is Governing’s transportation and infrastructure reporter. Dan developed a deep knowledge of government generally, and of states specifically, as a reporter for the Chicago Daily Law Bulletin and for Stateline. He has a master’s degree in public affairs reporting from the University of Illinois Springfield and a bachelor’s degree in English and German from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

October 18, 2016

Washington State Could Pass the Nation's First Carbon Tax. Why Aren't Environmentalists and Democrats Supporting It?

The ballot measure has divided the green community and created some unlikely alliances.
October 10, 2016

Unions Fight Ballot Efforts to Constitutionalize Right to Work

Right-to-work laws, which limit the power of labor unions, have been around for decades. Now business leaders and Republican lawmakers in two states want to make them permanent.
October 1, 2016

Are Voter ID Laws Dead? That Depends.

Judges are starting to strike down the laws, calling them racist. But their survival depends on the outcome of the November election.
September 30, 2016

Race, Redistricting, Religion and Death Penalty Top U.S. Supreme Court's New Docket

An evenly divided court could decide the fate of many cases watched closely by state and local officials.
September 27, 2016

States May Downshift Regulations for Driverless Cars

The federal government told states to take a backseat. While some will likely listen, others may push their plans full speed ahead anyway.
September 23, 2016

In Cash-Strapped States, Voters Could Protect Transportation Funds

Chronic budget problems in Illinois and New Jersey prompted lawmakers to shortchange their transportation funds. But voters could make sure legislators in the future keep their hands off.
August 30, 2016

In Flint's Aftermath, Water Will Run by New Rules

The water crisis in Michigan highlighted major problems with not just federal regulations but the way localities enforce them. That's all likely to change soon.
August 23, 2016

Big Transit Plans Go Before Voters in November

The proposals could reshape several large U.S. cities for decades to come -- if they pass.
August 18, 2016

In South Dakota, Voters Get Rare Chance to Transform Politics

Advocates around the country are weighing in on ballot measures that would drastically change South Dakota's elections, weaken the state’s Republican Party and send a message all over.
August 10, 2016

Coming Soon to D.C. Sidewalks: Delivery Robots

Washington, D.C., will be the first U.S. city to let a European company test its technology that replaces delivery drivers.
July 27, 2016

Some Officials Are Getting Schooled in Running Elections

At a time when the job of elections administration is becoming more complex and more scrutinized, a major university has started formal training.
July 26, 2016

Why Water in Schools Is So Susceptible to Lead Poisoning

New York is set to become the first state to require schools to regularly test their water for lead. But it's far from the only place with the problem.
July 25, 2016

Tim Kaine: The 3 Lessons I Learned From Local Government

Hillary Clinton's running mate is one of the few people in American history to serve as a mayor, governor and U.S. senator. (Oh yeah, he was also a city council member.)
July 15, 2016

The Week in Politics: New Kansas Voter ID Rules, Ferguson's Legacy and More

The most important election news and political dynamics at the state and local levels.
July 15, 2016

With Pence Pick, Trump Defies VP Traditions

Governors seem like obvious vice presidential candidates. But Indiana Gov. Mike Pence is only the second governor to run for VP since 1972.
July 11, 2016

Before Castile Shooting, Minnesota's Racial Justice Movement Was Already Underway

The governor said it's time to confront racism. Groups like Black Lives Matter have been trying for years.
June 28, 2016

Bike Share Isn’t Just for Big Cities

Smaller communities are increasingly adopting bike-sharing programs. But they look a lot different than those in big cities.
June 24, 2016

The Week in Politics: Presidential Politics Hits Statehouses, a Race to Replace a Convict and More

The most important election news and political dynamics at the state and local levels.
June 23, 2016

Why Columbus Won the Smart City Challenge

The Ohio capital beat out 77 other cities, including techie San Francisco, with its plans to use technology to solve transportation problems.
June 23, 2016

Why an Unmowed Capitol Lawn Could Be a Sign of Good Management

Sometimes the most efficient thing to do is to not do something.
June 17, 2016

Streetcars: If You Build It, Will They Come?

Slow to build and expensive to operate, streetcars could be the most maligned mode of transportation in America. Still, cities keep building them.
June 15, 2016

When Uber Leaves, What Happens?

Uber and Lyft have stopped or threatened to stop serving cities around the country. When they actually do, start-ups and riders scramble to fill the hole.
June 8, 2016

For Missouri Highways, a Quest to Draw a Better Map

Missouri is driving the push to make state highway maps more accurate and easier to update.
June 6, 2016

How Obama Changed the Relationship Between Washington, the States and the Cities

States haven’t been the willing political partners President Obama once hoped they would be. He’s found some ways to work around that.
May 24, 2016

Oregon Gets Company in Testing Gas Tax Alternatives

As the gas tax brings in less and less revenue, states are watching Oregon and California as they experiment with different ways to charge by mile.
May 20, 2016

The Secret to a Successful Bike Share

Seattle’s struggle to attract riders reveals what makes a bike-share program thrive -- or in the Emerald City’s case, barely survive.
May 11, 2016

New York City's Trying to Fight Gentrification Before It Happens

The city is spending hundreds of millions of dollars to help keep certain neighborhoods affordable. But it might be making things worse.
May 9, 2016

Is Fingerprinting Austin's Uber and Lyft Drivers Actually Safer?

Ride-hailing companies argue it's not, which is why they refuse to do it and are backing out of cities that try to make them. But security experts and public officials think otherwise.
May 4, 2016

Alabama’s One-Man Pension Show

He’s not the governor. He’s not a lawmaker. But thanks to the way he runs his state’s pension plans, David Bronner may be the most powerful man in Alabama.
April 29, 2016

The Week in Politics: Business Tycoon Upsets Utah Governor's Race, Where Veterans Are Serving in Legislatures and More

The most important election news and political dynamics at the state and local levels.
April 28, 2016

Massachusetts’ Unlikely Transit Team

The state’s secretary of transportation, Stephanie Pollack, is a liberal in a conservative administration and an advocate in an administrative post. But she’s making it work.
April 27, 2016

D.C. Commuters Could Go Airborne

The city may build an aerial gondola to shuttle people into and out of its oldest neighborhood.
April 26, 2016

Fingerprint Uber Drivers? Voters to Decide

How people in Austin, Texas, vote next month on background checks for ride-hailing drivers could have big consequences for cities across the country.
April 15, 2016

Can New Mexico Refuse Tax Refunds to Immigrants?

New Mexico is holding on to more than $4 million in tax refunds from thousands of undocumented immigrants. They're suing the state to get their money back.
April 8, 2016

Cities Create Their Own, Greener Transit Apps

In an effort to help people become less car-dependent, cities like Denver are getting directly involved in the creation of transportation apps.
April 6, 2016

Why Women Could Be the Key to Curbing Water Pollution

In Minnesota, women will be paid to persuade resistant farmers to care and do something about the state's increasingly polluted waterways.
March 23, 2016

Flint Investigation Finds State Most Responsible for Water Crisis

A panel appointed by Michigan Gov. Rick Snyder acknowledges missteps at all levels of government, but says the state's governor, agencies and emergency managers are chiefly to blame.
March 22, 2016

Study: 'Sharing' Services Boost Transit

Public transit rarely competes for riders with the likes of Uber, Car2Go or bike sharing. Instead, the different transit modes help each other.
March 18, 2016

The Week in Politics: Police Shootings Oust Prosecutors, Voter ID Gets Tested and More

The most important election news and political dynamics at the state and local levels.
March 7, 2016

In Preparation for Driverless Cars, States Start Upgrading Roads

Here’s what some places are already doing to accommodate self-driving and connected vehicles.
March 7, 2016

When Regulating Self-Driving Cars, Who’s at the Wheel?

In order for driverless cars to conquer the road, someone has to write the rules for their use. Right now, it’s not clear who that someone will be.
March 4, 2016

Clint Bolick: The Libertarian on the Court Bench

One of the nation’s most prominent libertarian legal activists is the newest member of the Arizona Supreme Court.
February 23, 2016

Rhode Island's New Route for Funding Bridge Repairs: Truck Tolls

Rhode Island is likely the first U.S. state to toll truckers and use the money to fix its bridges, which are in the worst shape of any state.
February 17, 2016

Compromise Ends New Mexico's Yearslong Battle on Immigrant Licenses

The deal between the governor and lawmakers makes the state's driver's licenses compliant with federal law and more secure but also lets unauthorized immigrants drive legally.
February 16, 2016

L.A.'s Library of Open Data Sparks Better Government

The city has created a path for other municipalities to make it easier than ever for agencies to share information with the public and each other.
February 3, 2016

Flint Crisis Renews Calls to Replace All Lead Pipes in America

There are more than 7 million lead service lines nationwide, and replacing them isn't easy or cheap. But Flint on Tuesday pledged to join the few cities that have gotten rid of the dangerous infrastructure.
January 26, 2016

With a Year Left, U.S. Transportation Secretary Sets New Goals

Anthony Foxx wants to tear down infrastructure that isolates communities and overhaul the way federal transportation funding is distributed to states and cities.
January 25, 2016

Did California's Jail Reforms Cause an Uptick in Crime?

After voters eased penalties for several common crimes, opponents claim the reforms have led to a crime wave.
January 15, 2016

New Software Makes Transit Planning More Like Video Gaming

The technology could help agencies make bus and train routes more efficient and spur more public debate.
January 13, 2016

In Final State of the Union, Obama Provokes One of His Biggest Barriers: GOP Governors

Republican governors have fought the president’s vision for America since he first took office. But he continues to push even their most-resisted policies.
January 5, 2016

What’s Keeping Pennsylvania From Passing a Budget?

Just like in Washington last year, Pennsylvania state lawmakers are still struggling to produce a state budget and avoid a partial government shutdown.
December 22, 2015

Colwyn, Pennsylvania: The Town That Can't Seem to Govern Itself

Colwyn, Pa., is a perfect example of what happens when virtually every aspect of local government breaks down.
December 21, 2015

To Avoid Losing Millions, States Tweak Gas Tax Laws

States that tie their taxes to the price of gas are in a tight spot as fuel prices hit six-year lows.
December 4, 2015

The Biggest Victim of Weekly Newspapers' Demise: Good Government

Alternative weekly newspapers are going out of business all over the country, leaving a huge void in local government coverage. Who will scrutinize city halls now?
December 2, 2015

A Decade in the Making, Congress Strikes a Deal on Transportation Funding

Here's how the new bill, which has been signed by Obama, will impact states and localities.
November 23, 2015

Water Utilities Target Private, Leaky Pipes

Hoping to keep pollution out of the water, agencies are looking for ways to convince -- sometimes compel -- property owners to inspect and repair them.
November 17, 2015

The Best Way to Prevent Drunk Driving? That's Debatable.

Advocates and states disagree over the effectiveness of ignition interlocks, which are basically car breathalyzers, versus 24/7 sobriety. Congress, though, will soon weigh in.
November 16, 2015

Can Governors Block Syrian Refugees From Their States?

After the terrorist attacks in Paris, more than half of the nation's governors -- almost all Republicans -- refused to accept Syrian refugees. Whether they have the authority to do so is questionable.
November 4, 2015

In Swing-State Ohio, Voters Limit Political Parties' Power in Redistricting

With the support of both Democrats and Republicans, voters ended some of the tactics that political parties use to increase their advantage in redistricting. It could be a big deal.
November 4, 2015

Texas Approves New Road Funding Plan

Voters approved a way to increase transportation funding without raising taxes or tolls. But some say it's a bad approach.
October 29, 2015

Congress Acts to Avoid Commuter Rail Shutdown

To avoid a traffic nightmare for millions of Americans, Congress is giving railroads more time to install a safety system to prevent deadly crashes.
October 28, 2015

Inside the Illinois Face-Off

Businessman Bruce Rauner, the first Illinois governor with no prior political experience, promised to "shake up Springfield." Now he and lawmakers are locked in the state's longest budget showdown -- with no end in sight.
October 26, 2015

Roads Are Getting a Redesign

The ‘complete streets’ movement is reshaping urban boulevards, small-town main streets and even rural highways. But there are still plenty of bumps in the road.
October 20, 2015

Louisiana Voters Split on Transportation Funding

Voters agreed to invest taxpayer money into infrastructure but rejected a measure to divert money from the state's rainy day fund toward transportation.
October 19, 2015

Gabe Klein on Government Experimentation, Uber and Self-Driving Cars

A leader in urban innovation in both the public and private sectors, Gabe Klein offers lessons for local leaders around the country.
October 9, 2015

After Years of Court Orders, California's Prison Population Finally Hits Target

The state's notoriously overcrowded prisons are finally seeing some relief. But it wasn't the state that catalyzed the change -- it was the voters.
September 23, 2015

Crowded, Crumbling Roads Take Center Stage in Louisiana Governor's Race

The candidates promise to improve the roads and traffic -- but they haven't said how they'll find money to do it.
September 16, 2015

The New Tool Helping Cities Build Sustainably

Before constructing new infrastructure, government agencies are starting to evaluate projects' potential economic, environmental and social impacts first to prevent problems down the road.
September 2, 2015

Disabled in DC: How Taxis and Uber Might Be Worsening the Paratransit Problem

Washington, D.C., is turning to taxi cabs to help improve disabled people's access to transportation. But advocates worry the move may prove pointless because it exempts the ride-hailing industry.
September 1, 2015

Disabled in DC: How Full-Time Paratransit Employees End Up on Government Assistance

Most cities contract out for jobs driving people with disabilities. The people in these positions often earn low wages, work long hours and sometimes even qualify for food stamps and Medicaid.
August 31, 2015

Disabled in DC: Coping With Increasing Costs and Demand for Paratransit

The challenges that the nation's capital faces to provide accessible and affordable transportation for people with disabilities reflect a nationwide struggle to live up to the ADA's promise.
August 26, 2015

States Step Up Scrutiny of Oil Trains

Some states are looking to prevent more derailments and spills, but the freight industry doesn't want more regulation.
August 17, 2015

How Car-Centric Cities Like Phoenix Learned to Love Light Rail

While other cities have struggled to finance their existing transit, Sun Belt cities like Phoenix have embraced light rail as a way to transform urban life.
July 29, 2015

After Winter Woes, New Board Takes Control of Boston Transit

Historic snowstorms brought the city's buses and trains to a standstill for weeks. Is new leadership enough to get the agency back on track?
July 27, 2015

Wrestling With Dark History, This Time in Minnesota's Capitol

Even in a state that helped defeat the Confederacy, legacies of the Civil War era are raising tough questions in the state capitol today.
July 13, 2015

Can Funny Traffic Signs Save Drivers' Lives?

Highway agencies are increasingly using humor and wit to try to get people to drive safer.
June 24, 2015

States Take Larger Role in Passenger Rail

A federal law enacted in the late days of the Bush administration is starting to force states to take a closer look at local Amtrak routes that they subsidize.
June 3, 2015

Virginia Discovers P3 Projects Might Not Always Save Money

After a few high-profile setbacks, the state that's been a model for others interested in public-private partnerships is tempering its enthusiasm for them.
June 1, 2015

Farmers and Cities Play the Water Pollution Blame Game

The White House finalized a rule last week to strengthen the Clean Water Act. But it doesn't resolve the fights going on between urban and rural interests in Iowa and elsewhere over how to clean up.
May 27, 2015

A New P3 Model for Building Green Infrastructure

One Maryland county is testing a unique public-private partnership that would not only save money but also help the environment and local economy.
May 18, 2015

States, Not Just Feds, Struggle to Keep Gas Tax Revenue Flowing

According to a Governing analysis, two-thirds of states' fuel taxes have failed to keep up with inflation, forcing lawmakers to revisit the politically fraught issue of raising taxes.
May 5, 2015

How Much Did States Spend Battling This Winter?

A new survey tries to quantify for the first time how much it costs state transportation agencies to cope with snow and ice.
May 1, 2015

Los Angeles Sets the Track for the Safest, Smartest Train

Cities are supposed to implement positive train control by the end of this year, but many are lagging. Los Angeles, however, got a head start years ago.
April 29, 2015

Next Move Is Congress' in Transportation Funding Saga

Transportation advocates all agree on the need to boost the country's spending on roads, bridges and transit. But they, like Congress, are split on how to pay for it.
April 29, 2015

Supreme Court Rules States Can Restrict Judicial Campaigning

"Judges are not politicians," wrote Chief Justice John Roberts in a 5-4 ruling.
April 14, 2015

How Cities Are Trying to Combat Toll Traffic

Transit agencies and companies have tried raising toll prices at peak times, but even that's not keeping drivers away, so they're looking for new ways to reduce congestion.
April 10, 2015

In Cities and Suburbs, Nearby Jobs Are Harder to Find

For most Americans, especially the poor and minorities, the number of jobs near home is declining.
April 8, 2015

The First New Rail Bridge to Mexico in More Than a Century

The 15-year effort required help, money and patience from two countries, one state and a railroad operator.
April 1, 2015

Gina Raimondo Confronts Rhode Island’s Uncertain Future

Rhode Island’s first female governor won support for her leadership during historic snowstorms, but it’s unclear whether courts or lawmakers will side with her on major pension and budget issues.
March 25, 2015

To Boost Employment, Town Considers Joining Private Sector

In a bid to give more jobs to residents of Akron, Ohio, Mayor Don Plusquellic wants to create a private entity to help the city build $1.4 billion in sewer improvements.
March 5, 2015

Alabama Suffers Setback in Railroad Tax Case

The U.S. Supreme Court sided with a freight railroad in its efforts to avoid paying sales tax on diesel fuel, but the legal challenge isn't over yet.
March 4, 2015

Some Cities May Soon Make Contractors Hire Local for Transportation Projects

Mayors say the U.S. Department of Transportation pilot program would help boost their local economies.
March 1, 2015

Why Cities Hit the Brakes on Red Light Cameras

The use of the once-popular traffic devices has been in decline since 2013.
February 25, 2015

Why Transportation Agencies Need More Women Engineers

North Carolina is trying to recruit girls for careers in engineering not only to fill anticipated vacancies but also because hiring more women could make the roads safer.
February 11, 2015

How Bruce Rauner Could Weaken Public Unions Nationwide

Illinois' new Republican governor wants the U.S. Supreme Court to reconsider the constitutionality of public-sector unions' funding sources.
February 9, 2015

Raising Gas Taxes Gets Bipartisan Boost from Governors

Fueled by low gas prices and deteriorating roads, at least a dozen states -- Democrat and Republican -- are considering increasing gas taxes this year.
February 2, 2015

What Obama's 2016 Budget Means for States and Localities

The president's budget would be a boon in a host of areas but also includes cuts to popular programs.
February 1, 2015

Suburbs Struggle to Aid the Sprawling Poor

Poverty in suburbs now outnumbers poverty in cities, a shift that’s put a major strain on public services and is easily visible in Austin, Texas.
January 28, 2015

Michigan Sends Road Funding Proposal to Voters

After several years, Gov. Rick Snyder has finally convinced lawmakers to spend more money on roads. There's one hitch: The state's voters have to approve the deal in May.
January 22, 2015

U.S. Transportation Chief Urges Mayors to Make Pedestrians a Priority

With pedestrian and cyclist deaths on the rise, Anthony Foxx challenged mayors to make the roads safer for both.
January 15, 2015

7 Ways Self-Driving Cars Could Impact States and Localities

Officials discussed the upcoming challenges earlier this week.
January 6, 2015

What Governors Want from Washington

Governors are busy preparing their agendas for state legislatures, but they have a to-do list for Congress too.
December 22, 2014

Washington, D.C., Looks to Bridge Divide with Bridge Park

A proposal to build a park over the Anacostia River would add a new landmark to the nation's capital and maybe help unite a long-divided city.
December 4, 2014

Utilities Worry Water's Becoming Unaffordable

Water bills have increased faster than any other and show no signs of slowing down, hitting low-income Americans the hardest.
December 1, 2014

Should Judges Be Allowed to Court Campaign Donors?

That’s what the U.S. Supreme Court will decide in a case that could make judicial elections even more like other political races.
November 24, 2014

Is the Federal Parking Benefit Worth $7 Billion a Year?

Transit advocates say the commuter parking benefit increases congestion and disproportionately benefits wealthy workers. But getting rid of it won't be easy.
November 6, 2014

What Midterm Election Results Mean for Transportation

Several victorious governors promised to find more money for transportation, while the Republican takeover of the U.S. Senate may slow progress on a federal surface transportation bill.
November 5, 2014

Voters Split on Transportation Funding in Louisiana, Maryland and Wisconsin

Constitutional protections for transportation money passed with overwhelming margins in Maryland and Wisconsin, but a bid to create an infrastructure bank in Louisiana failed again.
November 5, 2014

California Reduces Penalties for Drug Use and Other Nonviolent Crimes

The state that once pioneered get-tough approaches on crime with its “three strikes” law is now headed in the opposite direction.
November 5, 2014

Massachusetts Rolls Back Automatic Gas Tax Hike

One of the biggest criticisms of the gas tax in most places is that it doesn’t keep up with inflation. Massachusetts voters decided they like it that way.
November 5, 2014

Oil-Rich North Dakota Rejects Conservation Funding Measure

Environmental groups spent nearly twice as much money as their opponents to set aside some oil revenue for protecting the land, but the ballot measure lost by a landslide.
November 4, 2014

Traffic-Tied Texans Tap Oil and Gas Taxes for Transportation

Voters approved a constitutional amendment to increase transportation spending.
November 4, 2014

Why Cyclist Groups Lashed Out on the Latest Bike Safety Report

An analysis by the Governors Highway Safety Association that called attention to an increase in cyclist deaths caused an uproar among bike advocates.
November 1, 2014

How Political Donors Are Changing Statehouse News Reporting

A growing share of statehouse reporting in state capitols across the country comes from conservative groups, blurring the lines between journalism and advocacy.
November 1, 2014

Occupy Activist Earns a Seat on the Memphis Transit Board

The Occupy movement may be over, but some of its activists are still gaining influence in local government.
October 28, 2014

Increase in Bike Deaths Prompts Concerns

Most of the fatalities in the past three years happened in a handful of states and were adult men, according to a new report from the Governors Highway Safety Association.
October 27, 2014

3 States Consider Ways to Maximize Existing Transportation Money

Voters in Louisiana, Maryland and Wisconsin will all weigh in on proposals that, supporters say, will make existing transportation resources go further.
October 23, 2014

North Dakota Fights over How to Spend Huge Oil Revenues

Conservation groups want to use oil taxes to protect the state's environment, but schools, businesses and the oil industry have different priorities. Voters will decide in November.
October 20, 2014

Why Texas May Tap Its Rainy Day Fund During Boom Times

The state's economy is attracting 1,500 new residents a day, but growth is costing billions of extra dollars in road and traffic maintenance every year.
October 15, 2014

With Overcrowded Prisons, Californians Could Soften Some Crimes' Penalties

Law enforcement says Proposition 47 is the wrong way to lower the state's prison populations.
October 10, 2014

Will Massachusetts Repeal Automatic Gas Tax Hikes?

After two decades of leaving its gas tax untouched, Massachusetts tied the rate to inflation. In November, voters could join the list of states that repealed the automatic increase.
October 1, 2014

The Long-Term Cost of Building Transportation Projects on the Cheap

Factoring in the lifetime cost of new construction is considered good practice in the transportation industry, but surprisingly few government agencies do it.
October 1, 2014

The Driver Behind Public Transit’s Transformation in Atlanta

Keith Parker took over one of the most beleaguered and least loved transit systems in America -- and almost instantly reversed its course.
September 23, 2014

States Are Actually Driving Transportation Funding Declines

According to a new report, states' spending on transportation has dropped far more than the federal government's in the last decade.
September 22, 2014

Railroad Tax Fight Lands on Supreme Court Docket

Millions of dollars of tax revenue are at stake in a long-running dispute between Alabama and CSX. The decision could affect state tax systems nationwide.
September 9, 2014

Moody's Predicts Huge Potential for Public-Private Partnerships

Public-private partnerships are still relatively new for most U.S. states, but analysts anticipate they will become more common.
September 1, 2014

Facing Climate Change, Cities Embrace Resiliency

Lacking substantial state or federal support, local governments throughout the country are using natural disasters as a way to get their infrastructure, personnel and budgets better prepared for the next.
August 25, 2014

To Prevent Long Power Outages, Communities Look to Microgrids

As severe weather becomes more common, microgrids are gaining popularity as a way to keep the power on at critical facilities during widespread blackouts.
August 18, 2014

Alaska’s Oil and Identity at Stake on Ballot

In a state with an economy and government reliant on diminishing oil revenue, voters will decide whether to repeal a law that's designed to spur oil development but help the at-times corrupt oil industry.
August 11, 2014

Flagstaff Funds Wildfire Prevention with Bonds

The Arizona city is likely the only in the country to pay for wildfire prevention with bond money and is being looked to as a national model for leveraging federal funds.
July 28, 2014

Missouri Tax Hike Splits Transportation Advocates

Missourians will decide Tuesday whether to raise the state's sales tax to boost transportation funding.
July 16, 2014

Obama Wants Localities to Prepare for Climate Change

The Obama administration is taking action to help state and local governments prepare for climate change and natural disasters.
July 16, 2014

Local Governments Divided over New Clean Water Rules

After court rulings muddied up the law, new federal rules seek to clarify which bodies of water have to abide by the Clean Water Act.
July 11, 2014

The New Reality of Statehouse Reporting

While newspapers continue to cut their coverage of state capitols, a new study shows students and nonprofits are picking up some of the slack.
July 10, 2014

A Quiet Revolution in Trash Trucks

Garbage trucks get as little as 3 miles per gallon, making them prime targets in cities’ efforts to trim costs and curb greenhouse gas pollution.
July 1, 2014

Why Would You Have a Highway Run Through a City?

That’s what a growing number of cities are asking themselves -- Syracuse being the latest that may tear down its elevated urban expressway.
June 30, 2014

Star Players in World Cup Watch Parties: City Governments

Cities across the nation have teamed up with professional and minor league soccer teams to host public viewing parties to cheer on the United States.
June 23, 2014

Road Funding Bills Get Cold Shoulders at Statehouses

With elections looming, state lawmakers mostly left transportation funding alone.
June 23, 2014

Atlanta Shows What a Senior-Friendly Neighborhood Looks Like

Regional planners showcased a neighborhood with easy access to transportation, health services and entertainment. But it only lasted two days.
June 17, 2014

Some Cities Are Spurring the End of Sprawl

A new report claims there's an historic shift in suburbs from being car-dependent to walkable places, blurring the lines between "urban" and "suburban."
June 13, 2014

Localities Want More Say in Transportation Spending

Two years ago, Congress cut local leaders' role in deciding how federal money should be spent.
June 4, 2014

Under Scrutiny, States Trim List of Bad Bridges

All but nine states have decreased the number of "structurally deficient" bridges since the fatal Minneapolis bridge collapse in 2007. But experts warn that if Congress doesn't find the money to continue or increase current funding levels, the number of troubled bridges could start climbing again.
June 1, 2014

Should Private Companies Like Facebook Pay for Public Safety?

After the Silicon Valley city that Facebook calls home slashed its police services, Facebook put funding down for a new police officer.
May 29, 2014

How States Make Infrastructure Budgets

A new survey highlights the different approaches states take to manage long-term construction budgets.
May 28, 2014

Report: Keys to Successful Public-Private Partnerships

Flexibility, public engagement and predictability help attract outside money for infrastructure, experts say.
May 6, 2014

Motorcycle Deaths Decline in 2013

Cooler weather contributed to the rare dip, but safety experts say universal helmet laws are the best way to save lives in the long run.
May 2, 2014

Governors Push for Reforming the Revolving Door of Fire-Fighting Funding

As states and localities burn through federal fire-fighting funds faster than predicted, they worry the federal government will once again cut fire prevention programs to make up the difference.
May 1, 2014

Public Sector Takes Sides in Patent-Troll Fight

Transit agencies and public universities have a lot at stake while corporate heavyweights clash over state and congressional efforts to rein in “patent trolls.”
April 29, 2014

Obama Administration Unveils Transportation Spending Plan

With the "Grow America Act," the Obama administration wants to spur Congress to find money for roads, rail and transit before the federal government runs out of transportation money this summer.
April 22, 2014

Transit Agencies Turn to Alternative Fuels

Both environmental and budget concerns are prompting American municipal transportation agencies to turn away from diesel.
April 21, 2014

Facing an Uptick in Earthquakes, Oklahoma Consults California

After a dramatic increase in earthquakes that puts it behind only three other states in seismic activity, the Sooner State is worried about its bridges.
April 14, 2014

Congressional Inaction on Road Funding Hits the States

Concerned that Congress won't find enough money for planned projects by summer, Arkansas and Tennessee have scaled back transportation work. Other states are pondering similar moves.
February 26, 2013

Red-Light Cameras Keep Popping Up Despite Public, Legislative Outcry

This year, lawmakers in 22 states have filed more than 100 bills dealing with traffic cameras.