Who Said That

Vermont Gov. Phil Scott, commenting on the large amounts of federal funds that states are receiving under President Biden’s pandemic relief law. Guidance on how the funds can be used hasn’t yet been released but many governors and lawmakers are already developing plans on how they will invest the money. (Associated Press — May 10, 2021)
Former Alabama state Rep. Patricia Todd, commenting on passage of medical marijuana legislation. Todd had proposed a similar medical marijuana bill in 2013, which was not only rejected but received an award for “deadest“ bill of that year. (Associated Press — May 7, 2021)
Sharon Hoover, co-director of the National Center for School Mental Health (NCSMH), regarding the mental and emotional impact that the pandemic has had on students across the nation. The NCSMH is launching an online course to help train teachers and school staff on how to give support to students’ mental health concerns. (Reuters — May 6, 2021)
Maine Secretary of State Shenna Bellows, responding to complaints from motorists who are “appalled” by some of the messages on vanity plates in the state. Lawmakers are considering legislation to ban offensive language from vehicle plates. (Boston Globe — May 5, 2021)
Khadijah Ali-Coleman, co-director of Black Family Homeschool Educators and Scholars, regarding the increased number of households of color that are choosing to keep their child in remote learning options. While 52 percent of white fourth-graders returned to full-time, in-person instruction in February, less than one-third of Black and Hispanic, as well as just 15 percent of Asian American, fourth-graders returned to in-person classes. (Associated Press — May 4, 2021)
Kansas state Rep. Mark Samsel, regarding his arrest on charges of misdemeanor battery after a physical altercation with a student while substitute teaching in Wellsville. Samsel was caught on students’ videos discussing topics of suicide, sex, masturbation, God and the Bible and having physical interactions with the students. Samsel was later released on $1,000 bond. The superintendent has said Samsel will no longer be allowed to work for the district. (The Kansas City Star — April 30, 2021)
Rev. Dr. Lee E. Cooper Jr., as several Oklahoma lawmakers left the Senate floor in the middle of Cooper’s sermon, which criticized a senator’s misogynistic comments about Vice President Harris. (Oklahoma’s News 4 — April 29, 2021)
Attorney Bakari Sellers, regarding the North Carolina law that gives local courts the authority to decide whether police body camera videos should be released. The law has come under scrutiny lately after a state judge refused to release the footage of police deputies shooting and killing Andrew Brown Jr., a Black man who was killed in Elizabeth City last week. (Associated Press — April 29, 2021)
Sen. Gary Peters, chair of the Senate Commerce Committee’s subcommittee on Surface Transportation, Maritime, Freight, and Ports, regarding the need to further advance legislation on autonomous vehicles to decrease traffic fatalities and increase mobility. (The Hill — April 27, 2021)
Alaska Airlines spokesperson Tim Thompson, regarding the suspension of the state senator after she refused to follow the airline’s mask requirements. The suspension is immediate and the duration will be determined by a review. Alaska Airlines has banned over 500 people. (Associated Press — April 25, 2021)
Jake Fischer, the senior director of auto testing for Consumer Reports, regarding the inability for Tesla’s Autopilot to recognize that a person was not behind the wheel of the vehicle. The evaluation comes just days after a Tesla crashed and killed the two passengers, neither of whom were in the driver’s seat at the time of the crash, according to authorities. (Associated Press — April 22, 2021)
Dwight David Eisenhower, who had a notable military career, spoke out against the rising costs of war during his presidency. The quote from 1953 carries significance today as President Biden has announced the withdrawal of American troops from Afghanistan. Some refer to it as America’s “longest war.” It certainly has been costly, according to Governing Editor-at-Large Clay Jenkinson. (Governing—April 25, 2021)
Jodie Guest, a public health researcher at Emory University, regarding the 80 percent decline in COVID-related hospitalizations of older Americans as vaccinations increase. Senior citizens have accounted for 8 in 10 COVID-related deaths since the virus arrived in the U.S. Officials are now hoping that widespread vaccination will continue among other age groups. (Associated Press — April 22, 2021)
Tim Marema, editor of the Daily Yonder, a news website produced by the Center for Rural Strategies, regarding the fact that urban counties vaccination rates are much greater than the rates of rural counties, especially among those who are 65 years or older. (NPR — April 20, 2021)
Alfarena McGinty, of the Marion County, Ind., Coroner’s Office, commenting on the emotional toll that the recent mass shooting has taken on the staff. Coroners are the ones who must identify the victims, complete the death certificates and notify the families of the loss. (Reuters — April 20, 2021)
House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy tweeted, critiquing some House Republicans’ proposal of creating an America First Caucus which would promote “Anglo-Saxon political traditions” and aim to end mass immigration. (Associated Press — April 17, 2021)
House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy tweeted, critiquing some House Republicans’ proposal of creating an America First Caucus which would promote “Anglo-Saxon political traditions” and aim to end mass immigration. (Associated Press — April 17, 2021)
Brooklyn Center, Minn., Mayor Mike Elliott, regarding the police tactics that were used to control demonstrators outside the city's police station to protest the shooting of Daunte Wright, a Black motorist, during a traffic stop last week. (Associated Press — April 16, 2021)
Brooklyn Center, Minn., Mayor Mike Elliott, regarding the police tactics that were used to control demonstrators outside the city's police station to protest the shooting of Daunte Wright, a Black motorist, during a traffic stop last week. (Associated Press — April 16, 2021)
Del Rio, Texas, Sheriff Joe Frank Martinez, regarding many city residents’ opinions that the situation of people immigrating into the city illegally from Mexico has gotten out of hand. Many Del Rio residents’ are worried for their safety and started wearing and using guns as a way to protect themselves against the migrants. (Reuters — April 15, 2021)
Russell Jeung, professor of Asian American studies at San Francisco State University and co-founder of the group Stop AAPI Hate, commenting on the fact that Asian American students are much more likely to remain in remote learning than members of other racial or ethnic groups. (NPR — April 9, 2021)
Mark Arm, longtime front man of the Seattle grunge rock band Mudhoney, on what he calls a “pretty crazy and weird honor” of the band becoming the namesake for a massive new tunnel-boring machine. MudHoney the machine (with a capital H) was the overwhelming choice (76 percent) in an online vote run by Seattle Public Utilities. When the giant drill gets to work this summer, it will dig a tunnel almost 19 feet wide and 2.7 miles long to satisfy a federal consent decree for King County to reduce storm and wastewater pollution. The project is expected to be completed by 2025. (Seattle Times — April 12, 2021)
Northeastern University Chancellor Kenneth Henderson, regarding the university’s decision to require students to get vaccinated against COVID-19 before returning to campus in the fall in hopes to achieve herd immunity on campus. Universities are divided about requiring students to get vaccinated before returning to campus. (Associated Press — April 12, 2021)
Denise Lieberman, of the Missouri Voter Protection Coalition, protesting the bill that was passed by the state Legislature last month that will impose strict voting regulations, including photo ID requirements. (NPR — April 9, 2021)
Kolina Koltai, a vaccine misinformation researcher at the University of Washington, regarding the large proportion of Americans who are not planning on getting the coronavirus vaccine and the many reasons why they are declining it. Experts are worried that there will be too many people who don’t get the vaccine for the nation to reach herd immunity. (NPR — April 7, 2021)
Idaho state Rep. Sage Dixon, regarding the state’s decision to approve legislation that would give lawmakers veto power over the federal government and federal court decisions. Several lawmakers predict court challenges to the legislation if it becomes law. (Associated Press — April 6, 2021)
Tennessee, in the state’s request that the U.S. Supreme Court reinstate a 48-hour waiting period for abortions. (Reuters — April 5, 2021)
Matthew Behrs, a Trump supporter, regarding President Biden’s immigration policies and the sharply increasing number of unaccompanied migrant children arriving at the U.S.-Mexico border. Overall, about 40 percent of adult Americans disapprove of Biden’s response to the southern border situation. (Associated Press — April 5, 2021)
Texas Sen. Bryan Hughes, regarding a bill that would block social media companies from banning residents due to their political views. (The Hill — April 1, 2021)
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