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Law Enforcement Agencies Using Drones List, Map

Current as of 2013

Drones are being deployed in a small, but growing number of state and local law enforcement operations.

It was recently revealed that U.S. Customs and Border Protection has flown hundreds of domestic drone missions on behalf of other agencies, including several state and local public safety agencies.

The following map shows state and local law enforcement agencies that either applied for the Federal Aviation Administration's drone authorization program or are known to have borrowed Customs and Border Protection drones for missions. Click an icon for details. Information was compiled from records obtained by the Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF) and is current as of 2013.

Federal agencies, municipal governments or non-law enforcement agencies experimenting with drones, such as colleges are universities, are not listed. Other government agencies are listed on EFF's drone authorization map.

 

 
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