Andy Kim

Andy Kim

Former Staff Writer

Andy Kim is a former GOVERNING staff writer. A graduate of the University of Wisconsin's School of Journalism, he has also worked in advertising as a copywriter.

NYC’s director of state legislative affairs, Micah C. Lasher, on the state's distribution of aid to school districts in the final budget plan. Of the $230 million restored to education, the majority will go to counties north of New York City.
The number of bridges in need of major repair or replacement nationwide, according to a Transportation for America report, which notes that the federal government does not provide sufficient funds for the fixes.
Arthur Aidala, a defense lawyer, on the upcoming trial charging a contractor and three construction supervisors with the death of two NYC firefighters in the 2007 Deutsche Bank building blaze. Although the city admitted failure to properly inspect the building, it received immunization from prosecution.
The time the Minn. House ended a six-hour debate Wednesday and voted 68-59 to pass a Republican-backed education bill, which includes provisions to abolish tenure and limit collective bargaining rights for teachers.
The amount that Montgomery County, Md. and the Washington Suburban Sanitary Commission paid for a $3 million project. Reportedly because of the complex payment system, developers received double the pay for one service.
Lou Phillips, business manager of a laborers' union in Chicago, where chronic absenteeism and hiring freezes have caused the city to cut the number of rodent control workers by nearly half.
State Rep. Grant Burgoyne on a bill that bans assisted suicide and could lock up violators for five years. The legislation was sent to Idaho Gov. C.L. Otter for his signature on March 28.
The number of immigration bills state legislators are expected to introduce this year.
Assistant U.S. Attorney Barry Glickman, who will oversee the federal prosecution of drug- and gun-related crimes committed in Marion County, Ind. Law enforcement there has partnered with federal authorities, hoping that the anticipation of facing federal charges, which have harsher penalties, will reduce the community's violent crime.
State Rep. Kim Thatcher on the House's passage of two bills to extend federal unemployment benefits to Oregonians who have been out of work for more than a year and a half. She suggested the possibility of setting eligibility requirements, such as drug tests and/or community service.