Internet Explorer 11 is not supported

For optimal browsing, we recommend Chrome, Firefox or Safari browsers.

Pence's Indiana Replacement Creates Drug Czar Position

On his first day in office, Indiana’s new Republican governor, Eric Holcomb, signed an executive order creating a new state-level position to coordinate anti-drug efforts, a move at least two other states made last year to turn back the rising tide of opioid addiction.

On his first day in office, Indiana’s new Republican governor, Eric Holcomb, signed an executive order creating a new state-level position to coordinate anti-drug efforts, a move at least two other states made last year to turn back the rising tide of opioid addiction.

 

The person Holcomb tapped for the post, Jim McClelland, former CEO of Goodwill Industries of Central Indiana, will coordinate the drug-related activities of nine state agencies. McClelland also will gauge the impact of state programs designed to reduce addiction, a huge and growing problem in Indiana.

 

At least two other states, Idaho and New Hampshire, created similar posts last year, and a gubernatorial transition team in West Virginia is recommending that incoming Democratic Gov. Jim Justice create a similar executive-level job. Huntington, West Virginia, the state’s hardest hit city, created a citywide drug czar position in 2015.

 

As the opioid epidemic expands, states and cities are attacking the problem on multiple fronts, including law enforcement, public health, emergency response and treatment. States also are creating registries to prevent patients from receiving opioid painkillers from more than one doctor, and working with the medical community to set safer guidelines for prescribing the highly addictive drugs.  

 

"Since 1999, Indiana has seen a 500 percent increase in drug overdose deaths. This is an epidemic tragically affecting Hoosiers from every walk of life in every part of our state," Holcomb said. "This new position will provide the urgent and concerted attention required to effectively reduce the impact drug addiction is having on families, individuals and children."

Caroline Cournoyer is GOVERNING's senior web editor.
Special Projects
Sponsored Stories
Sponsored
In recent years, local governments have been forced to adapt to a wildly changing world, especially as it pertains to sending bills and collecting payments.
Sponsored
Workplace safety is in the spotlight as government leaders adapt to a prolonged pandemic.
Sponsored
While government employees, students and the general public had to wait in line for hours in the beginning of the pandemic, at-home test kits make it easy to diagnose for the novel coronavirus in less than 30 minutes.
Sponsored
Governments around the nation are working to design the best vaccine policies that keep both their employees and their residents safe. Although the latest data shows a variety of polarizing perspectives, there are clear emerging best practices that leading governments are following to put trust first: creating policies that are flexible and provide a range of options, and being in tune with the needs and sentiments of their employees so that they are able to be dynamic and accommodate the rapidly changing situation.
Sponsored
Service delivery and the individual experience within health and human services (HHS) is often very siloed and fragmented.
Sponsored
In this episode, Marianne Steger explains why health care for Pre-Medicare retirees and active employees just got easier.
Sponsored
Government organizations around the world are experiencing the consequences of plagiarism firsthand. A simple mistake can lead to loss of reputation, loss of trust and even lawsuits. It’s important to avoid plagiarism at all costs, and government organizations are held to a particularly high standard. Fortunately, technological solutions such as iThenticate allow government organizations to avoid instances of text plagiarism in an efficient manner.
Sponsored
Creating meaningful citizen experiences in a post-COVID world requires embracing digital initiatives like secure and ethical data sharing, artificial intelligence and more.
Sponsored
GHD identified four themes critical for municipalities to address to reach net-zero by 2050. Will you be ready?