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Management and Administration

Covering topics such as remote work, union relations and workforce development.

The state’s Department of Administration’s Hearings and Appeals Division reports a backlog of 13,842 workers’ compensation cases, caused, in part, by the pandemic. Officials currently have no concrete plans for reform.
The Ohio county is re-evaluating its operational and organizational structure to determine how many of the 800 current job openings actually need to be filled for systems to continue to function.
The president’s forgiveness of student loans aroused plenty of controversy. State and local governments can help craft a more sustainable federal plan that could help to relieve their own workforce shortages and staffing costs.
The State Employees’ Retirement System has sunk to $34.5 billion, a quarterly decrease of 8.5 percent. The system funds more than 70,000 older state and public school retirees with pension payments that haven’t changed since 2004.
The Labor and Workforce Development Agency will spend $480 million over the next three years to expand apprenticeship programs across the state in an effort to help workers increase their salaries.
As of July, approximately 440,000 Louisianans have voluntarily left their jobs this year, the highest total for the first seven months of a year since 2000. But experts say mobility signals a healthy economy, albeit a challenging one for employers.
A recent poll found that for 69 percent of likely voters, cost of living, jobs and the economy combined to rank as the highest-priority issue for the upcoming election, with 87 percent ranking cost of living and the economy as the two most important.
The Labor Department has increased its previous estimate of pandemic-era unemployment benefits fraud by nearly $30 billion. The agency has opened more than 190,000 investigations and charged more than 1,000 with fraud.
COVID-19 illustrated how paid sick leave doesn’t just protect people’s livelihoods; it can save lives. Seventeen states now have mandatory paid sick leave laws; at least 20 cities and counties have similar requirements.
The legislation would provide $400 million worth of tax credits to reimburse a portion of union members’ dues payments starting in 2024; it’s not yet clear how much each member would be eligible to receive.
The pandemic overwhelmed a long-neglected public health system, pressuring many workers to leave. But a new program hopes to inspire AmeriCorps members to work in public health.
Mayor Eric Adams will spend the city money to connect 3,000 high school students with multiyear, paid apprenticeships at large finance and tech firms at a time when 8.3 percent of city government jobs are vacant.
A new study from Oxfam America reported that Texas was ranked 48th on a list of best states to work, a decrease from its 47th rank the year prior, based on its poor wages, worker protections and organizing rights.
While the entire nation is struggling amid a worker shortage, Maine’s aging workforce presents unique challenges. Workers that may have previously been overlooked are now being sought out and trained to fill labor gaps.
In a brave new world of hybrid work — or not — IT leaders rethink what it means to work for the public sector and what investments are needed to keep everyone connected.
Proposed legislation would implement a federal standard to safeguard workers against hazardous conditions, including extreme heat, supplementing California’s guidelines. The bill currently only has Democratic support.