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Community Life and Development

Over the past couple of decades, coffeehouses became centers of sociability and community life. In the wake of the virus, many of them are switching to a grab-and-go model. Can anything replace these vital “third places”?
No one disputes that we need more housing. But the YIMBY movement has a broader set of goals that would threaten the tradition of local land use decisions in America.
They have a long history, and they have been our "public living room." Some cities and towns that have lost their central gathering places are trying to re-create them.
It seems logical that we would be rushing to turn vacant office buildings into apartments and condos. So far it’s not happening on a large scale, but there are reasons to think it’s in our urban future.
Without both, a new book argues, a community can’t achieve its highest purpose. Some cities and suburbs have managed to combine them. Most are finding it difficult.
America’s third-largest city has a plenitude of problems. But it has great advantages as well.
Neighborhood change is unsettling. Whose fault is that? Maybe nobody’s.
Corporate investment can be an economic boon to low-income communities. It can also be a cultural threat.
Cities have been struggling with the question for decades. Some are welcoming the murals and other street painting they used to deplore. Others call it vandalism and are erasing it.
The street vendors who sell food to downtown customers are a boon to urban life. Cities ought to have more of them.
The famous road in Austria’s capital is a masterpiece of monumental design. But it’s no model for American planners to emulate.
City centers have had a rough couple of years. But there is a way forward if they have the fortitude to take it.
The familiar grid has its detractors, but it also has strengths. Could an eccentric Spanish architect from the 1840s teach us how to do it right?
It’s not a household name, but it’s a place with a distinct culture and a raft of economic opportunities.
We used to allow homeowners to operate commercial businesses on their property. By and large, it worked. We can do it again. Say hello to “accessory commercial units.”
Ohio’s largest city has never attracted much national attention, but that is beginning to change.