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Carpooling: Commuting Statistics, Map

While commuting data suggests relatively few Americans carpool to work, their numbers vary greatly across regions. The following map shows statistics for numbers of people who carpool to work in larger metro areas with at least 50,000 commuters. Larger icons represent areas with higher concentrations of carpools. Pan the map to view Alaska and Hawaii.

 
Larger icons represent metro areas where those who carpool account for higher shares of all commuters.
Source: Census Bureau: 2010-2012 American Communities Survey 3-year estimates
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