Internet Explorer 11 is not supported

For optimal browsing, we recommend Chrome, Firefox or Safari browsers.

A Subway Named Denial

This week the Washington Post is publishing a compelling series of articles on the region's Metro transit system, saying the the nation's second busiest subway ...

This week the Washington Post is publishing a compelling series of articles on the region's Metro transit system, saying the the nation's second busiest subway system is in decline, despite the expenditure of more than a billion dollars to improve its reliability, and blaming it on mismanagement. I ride the subway every day and rarely have a problem, but the Post's numbers are pretty convincing. So what do I encounter but two Metro workers at the top of the escalator (it's always great to find an escalator working, by no means a sure thing) handing out hurriedly printed fliers assuring riders that much of the Post's information is outdated and "we have already tackled many of the concerns raised." Am I being picky when I wonder if these employees were pulled from train maintenance to hand out the fliers -- or worse, that Metro had no trouble finding plenty of employees without much to do to undertake this task?

John Martin is a senior editor for Governing.
Special Projects