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From 1890-1930, they exploded across the American landscape, offering people the chance to own a home just outside the city. Lack of government support curtailed their growth, but these historic neighborhoods serve as models for efficient urban planning.
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The Washington state Supreme Court will consider whether enforcing fares on public transit systems violates passengers’ rights. If upheld, the court’s ruling could have statewide ramifications.
The city joins every county in the state as it signed the billion-dollar deal just ahead of the deadline, following months of pushback. The money will fund treatment services, medicine distribution and educational outreach.
With 44 percent of state residents living in a child-care desert, there aren’t enough options. Child care for two children uses 27 percent of a family’s income. The Tri-Share program aims to reduce those obstacles.
After a payment issue nearly shut off power to the Buckfield Fire Station, legislators are considering a ban on disconnecting utilities for public safety buildings without a 60-day warning first.
34 community and 40 non-community systems are producing drinking water with high levels of the PFAS contaminants, impacting thousands of state residents. N.J. is the first state to set strict standards for PFAS.
The pilot program aims to encourage electric vehicle adoption among farmers and other commercial customers to help reduce the impacts of climate change, which directly impacts the state’s agriculture.
The aging digital infrastructure behind the Department of Public Health’s online dashboard was unable to keep up with the flood of new COVID-19 data caused by the omicron variant, resulting in updates to be several days late.
Elbert County Clerk and Recorder Dallas Schroeder has allegedly copied a voting system’s hard drive and has been summoned for a deposition. This is the second election official to be investigated for a potential security breach.
Ten members of Congress have requested an investigation into the Border Patrol’s evidence collection teams, the latest development into the handling of the 2010 killing of Anastasio Hernández Rojas.
Though the state has been experimenting with smart meters since 2008, utilities have once again refocused on the technology as a way for electric vehicle owners to manage their electricity use.
An Indiana bill would pave the way for the state to set guidelines for nuclear power usage. While the energy is touted as clean and reliable, many worry that it will increase costs for customers.
The bill will provide the Department of Finance and Administration $50,000 for state agencies to assess if they need language access plans so those with limited English skills can access their services.
  • Art Spiegelman, author of the graphic novel “Maus,” which won the Pulitzer Prize in 1992, commenting on the McMinn County, Tenn., School Board’s decision to remove “Maus” from its curriculum due to “inappropriate language” and an image of a nude woman-mouse. The graphic novel depicts the story of his Jewish parents living in Poland in the 1940s and their experiences as a Holocaust survivor. In the novel, Jews are drawn as mice and Nazis are drawn as cats. (Associated Press — Jan. 27, 2022)
The tragedies in Philadelphia and the Bronx have put a spotlight back on the country’s deplorable housing market for the poorest families. Proposals to fix and fund the problem are on the table.
All city technology agencies will now operate under the Office of Technology and Innovation, overseen by Chief Technology Officer Matthew Fraser. Fraser took over the CTO position earlier this month.
Irrigation organizations play a crucial behind-the-scenes role in delivering water to farmers. But only one out of every five has an official strategy for responding to drought.
States and localities have been slow to spend federal emergency money.
A team of researchers found 35,000 pairs of existing reservoirs, lakes and old mines in the US that could be turned into long-term energy storage – and they don’t need dams on rivers.
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The nation’s gross domestic product growth last year as it rebounded from the 2020, pandemic-induced recession, the largest increase since 1984.
30%
The trust gap between Democrats and Republicans in the scientific community, with 64 percent of Democrats trusting science and only 34 percent of Republicans, the largest gap since NORC at the University of Chicago began administering the General Social Survey in 1972. The science trust gap has widened significantly since 2018 when 51 percent of Democrats and 42 percent of Republicans had high confidence.
The number of people in Wisconsin who lack access to quality broadband services according to a 2021 report from the Federal Communications Commission. However, a privately conducted study estimated the actual number of disconnected residents could be more than 600,000. Gov. Tony Evers is urging residents who can’t afford Internet service to sign up for new federal subsidies.
37
The number of people who died in avalanches across the nation last year, the most in at least 70 years, with 12 of those deaths occurring in Colorado, the most the state has seen since the 1915-1916 season.
The national median sale price for an existing home in 2021, a 17 percent increase from the year prior. The typical American home gained $50,200 in value last year.
43%
President Joe Biden’s approval rating after one year in office. Only 28 percent of Americans, just 48 percent of Democrats, want Biden to run for re-election in 2024.
The amount that the Biden administration will use to improve the country’s ports and waterways to increase climate resilience, improve drinking water and bolster the nation’s supply chain. The funds will assist more than 500 projects.
The cost of the Biden administration’s plan to significantly expand wildfire fighting efforts, by doubling the use of controlled fires and logging to reduce catastrophic fire risk.
The number of acres for the proposed construction of a lake in Nebraska. State lawmakers made the proposal for the reservoir to be placed between Omaha and Lincoln. The $200 million project would improve the water supply in the area and boost economic development.
The number of Americans who have signed up for health insurance since the beginning of the 2022 open enrollment period in November, including 10 million people across 33 states who have utilized the federal marketplace exchange. The number reflects a 21 percent increase compared to the year prior.
The amount that the Biden administration will award, in grants, to nonprofit groups and state and local governments to better protect low-income families from household health risks, such as lead-based paint, mold and carbon monoxide.
The number of patients who were hospitalized this week, a new pandemic high driven by the omicron surge. Across the nation, approximately 30 percent of ICU beds are filled with COVID-19 patients.
The federal government is sending billions to cities and counties to overcome pandemic setbacks. Plans from 150 local governments offer a preview of how these dollars might be spent.
Newly released data shows an increasingly diverse American population. About 30 percent identify as racial or ethnic minorities, according to the latest Census Bureau estimates.
A comprehensive view of the states’ marijuana laws regarding medical use, workplace accommodations and driving under the influence. Today, 36 states and the District of Columbia allow medical use of marijuana.
Billions of dollars available to state and local governments might be enough to bring affordable broadband to all Americans. But some states have yet to produce plans for these funds.
Recent data shows that while overall spending has increased, there is great variation among states on public education expenditures per student. The average is $12,612, but New York spends nearly double that amount.
View demographic data showing representation of racial and ethnic minorities in each police department.
A new report reveals the great variation of federal dependency across the states. But drawing the line between federal and state responsibility is not easy.
State totals on active duty, reserve forces and civilian employees for each branch of the military.
The American Society of Civil Engineers gave our airports, roads, bridges and drinking water a C- in its latest report card, calling it a modest improvement. But the bill on progress is a long way from being paid off.
In hopes of reducing the city's high crime rate, Camden, N.J., made a controversial and unprecedented move a year ago to replace its police force.
A new report analyzes which states have the most eco-friendly behavior, good environmental quality and contribute the most to reduce climate change. Rankings are split between blue and red states.
Data shows total law enforcement staff and per capita rates.
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