How NYC Turned Salt Into Art

The Spring Street Salt Shed has been lauded as one of the city's best public sculptures.
by | February 2017
(Photography by FieldCondition Courtesy of Dattner Architects /WXY Urban Design and New York City Department of Design & Construction and New York City)

An unlikely public building sits at the northern edge of Tribeca, by far Manhattan’s priciest neighborhood.

The building is the Spring Street Salt Shed, and it holds 5,000 tons of salt to help deal with winter’s snow and ice. The 67-foot-tall angular structure is modeled on the shape of a salt crystal, and its bluish concrete walls are meant to age to a salty gray.

Wealthy Tribeca residents had fought it for years.

But since the $18 million shed opened last winter, it’s been lauded as an achievement in urban art. The New York Times’ architecture critic opined, “I can’t think of a better public sculpture to land in New York than the shed.”

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David Kidd | Design Director | dkidd@governing.com