Health & Human Services

In Utah, It’s Your Marijuana Prescription or Your Concealed Gun

Utah, complying with the federal Gun Control Act, denies or revokes concealed-carry firearms permits for anyone with a prescription for marijuana. While Utah doesn’t allow marijuana to treat ailments, eight of the 31 states that recognize Utah’s concealed firearms permit do.
July 26, 2013
 

Medical marijuana and concealed firearms are gaining in popularity, but in Utah, they’re in conflict.

Utah, complying with the federal Gun Control Act, denies or revokes concealed-carry firearms permits for anyone with a prescription for marijuana. While Utah doesn’t allow marijuana to treat ailments, eight of the 31 states that recognize Utah’s concealed firearms permit do.

Jason Chapman, firearms supervisor for the Utah Bureau of Criminal Identification, said he can only recall seeing one or two such conflicts, though he added that not every case comes across his desk. In those cases, Chapman said, BCI denied permits to applicants who sent their marijuana prescription card along with their other identification.

BCI does not keep records of how many applicants or holders are denied for medical marijuana. BCI, in its regular report on concealed-carry permit violations, lumps those cases into a category labeled "controlled substance."

But with Utah’s concealed firearms permit popular among non-Utahns because so many states honor it and medical marijuana gaining acceptance, the issue seems headed for more conflict.

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