Health & Human Services

Study Rates States on Long-Term Care

June 20, 2014

In just 12 years, the oldest members of the huge baby-boom generation will turn 80. Many will need some kind of long-term care. A new study from AARP says that care could vary dramatically in cost and quality depending on where they live.

The study was motivated by a simple fact: The number of available family caregivers is declining. In 2010, there were potentially seven for each person 80 years old or older. By the time baby boomers reach that age, there will be only four potential caregivers for each of them. And those numbers are expected to continue declining. Chalk it up to longer lives and smaller families.

Susan Reinhard, a senior vice president at AARP, says the study can show states where they need to improve. “The gradual pace of improvement has to pick up,” she says. “We don’t have the time to get ready for the demographic imperative that is before us.”

The study looked at 26 different variables in each state, from affordability and access to whether care is delivered in private homes or more expensive nursing homes. Reinhard says states that encouraged more care at home got higher marks. “It’s a philosophy, it’s a value that states have and they work hard to make that happen,” she says.

AARP calls its study a scorecard. So, if you’re keeping score, the state with the highest marks was Minnesota, followed by Washington, Oregon, Colorado and Alaska. Bringing up the rear were Indiana, Tennessee, Mississippi and Alabama, with Kentucky coming in last.

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